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SPORTS
June 29, 2014 | BY JAKE KAPLAN, Daily News Staff Writer kaplanj@phillynews.com
YESTERDAY afternoon, hours before Kyle Kendrick's 89-mph sinker kick-started a four-game series between the Phillies and Braves, Cliff Lee pitched to Tony Gwynn Jr., Cesar Hernandez and Ronny Cedeno. Simulating two innings of play, the Phillies' lefthander threw 20 pitches - both fastballs and breaking balls - took a seat and then tossed 20 more. Afterward, Lee offered a positive review of the session, signifying more progress in his recovery from the elbow strain in his pitching arm that landed him on the disabled list on May 20. This was his first time facing live hitters.
NEWS
June 23, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Once looking to shed its real estate holdings, Montgomery County is now considering spending tens of millions of dollars to overhaul or expand its headquarters and surrounding offices in Norristown. The Board of Commissioners is hiring a consultant to study a range of possibilities, including rehabilitating One Montgomery Plaza, building atop the county courthouse plaza, replacing an underground parking garage, renovating or tearing down the old stone prison, or even expanding the county footprint by buying the Post Office building behind the courthouse.
SPORTS
June 18, 2014 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
ATLANTA - To Ryne Sandberg, he was a respected peer. To Larry Bowa, he was a manager's dream. To Tony Gwynn Jr., he was simply, "Dad. " The Phillies joined the baseball world in mourning the passing of Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn yesterday, while at the same time moving to fill an opening on their bench as Gwynn Jr. left the team to return home to San Diego and was placed on the bereavement list. The organization had been aware that the elder Gwynn was in grave condition. Bowa, who managed Gwynn for a year and a half with the Padres, said Gwynn Jr. told his teammates during a road trip last month that his father's cancer, which originated in his mouth, was not responding to treatment.
SPORTS
June 12, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Too often, Mike Adams said, he has heard somber news from a doctor about his right shoulder. "I was already planning for the worst based on history and how my shoulder was feeling," Adams said. "But getting those results back . . . I'm optimistic again. " There is no damage to Adams' rotator cuff, the part of the shoulder that required surgery last July. Still, the Phillies righthander will require a cortisone injection later this week in an effort to strengthen the area around his labrum, which is fraying, according to an MRI examination.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Amid the chaos of Stacy Brandt's childhood, books were her only friends. "Harry Potter saved my life," the author, 23, says. "I read those first two Harry Potter books over and over. It's how I learned to write. " Her self-published memoir, Things I Learned (available through stacybrandt.com) is about a different magical 'friend' of the most sinister sort: Heroin. "It turned me into a person I never thought I would be," Brandt says from Millville, N.J., where she has been clean and sober since Feb. 20, 2013, after an overdose.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When Frank ONeill's heart was failing, what saved his life was a heart transplant. But what improved his quality of life and the strength of his peripheral muscles before his transplant was an individually tailored exercise program that he paid for out of pocket - $300 for six sessions - at Lankenau Heart Institute, part of Main Line Health. Now, for the first time, Medicare will cover cardiac rehabilitation programs for patients suffering from "stable, chronic heart failure," according to a February decision memo from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
REAL_ESTATE
May 11, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
She's already completed a half-dozen real estate development projects, and Sheila Dragon is just getting started. "Nicole Curtis, watch out!" Dragon said, referring to her television inspiration, the host of the DIY Network reality show Rehab Addict , who rescues historic houses. Dragon is one of a small but growing number of female developers in the Philadelphia area. Working for many years as a home stager through her West Chester-based company Dragon Design, she realized she was increasingly overseeing renovations and architects, completing the sales process from start to finish but not being paid for the end result.
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cole Hamels will pitch Thursday in Clearwater and is expected to join the Phillies rotation next week in Los Angeles. "I'm optimistic about that," manager Ryne Sandberg said. Hamels is recovering from left biceps tendinitis. It delayed his spring-training work and kept him sidelined since the start of the season. He last pitched in a rehab start Saturday in Clearwater, when he threw 67 pitches. Assistant general manager Scott Proefrock called Hamels' return against the Dodgers a "distinct possibility.
SPORTS
April 14, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Ryne Sandberg said Phillies righthander A.J. Burnett, who left Friday night's game after 41/3 innings with soreness in his groin, will be tested on Monday. The manager did not specify the type of test. When asked before Saturday's win over the Miami Marlins how Burnett felt the day after the injury, Sandberg said: "Similar to last night. "   Burnett threw 106 pitches and said the discomfort was off and on but was more constant in the fifth inning. Sandberg said that long reliever Jeff Manship and triple-A starter David Buchanan would be candidates to replace Burnett if he had to be placed on the disabled list.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna didn't expect that things would be easy after her husband Richard suffered the double whammy of a blood infection and a stroke a year ago. But it was a surprise that the emotional damage from the stroke was more disturbing than his physical disabilities. He could no longer plan his days and didn't fully understand his limitations. What hurt her most, though, was that her feelings seemed to mean nothing to him. "I think a 5-year-old probably had more empathy than he did," said Donna, 56, of Rosemont.
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