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Reimbursement

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NEWS
May 10, 1989 | By Jonathan Sidener, Special to The Inquirer
Pemberton Township Mayor Elmer D'Imperio's trip to Atlantic City last month was no all-expenses-paid junket to some foreign shore. But the $85 in overnight lodging that was billed to the township and $49.50 billed for a vinyl briefcase purchased earlier this year have created a stir among the township's elected officials. The Township Committee paid for the briefcase in March and the hotel stay in April. But on Thursday night, the committee reversed itself and voted 3-2 to require D'Imperio to pay back the township for the two purchases.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Bryon Kurzenabe, Special to The Inquirer
The Willingboro Board of Education has voted to rescind an out-of-court settlement with Superintendent Peter Romanoli that would have reimbursed him for expenses he incurred during several business trips last year. By a 4-3 vote July 22, the school board refused to pay Romanoli $921.18 spent during February 1990, in part at a leadership seminar in Florida and at the annual convention of the American Association of School Administrators (AASA) in California. The vote reaffirmed a decision by the board in November that denied Romanoli's request for reimbursement because he took the trips when the board was negotiating a new contract for the district's 596 teachers and secretaries.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The Interboro school board has denied tuition reimbursement to 24 teachers and delayed salary adjustments for nine others who took graduate-level education courses during the summer. Board President John Costello acknowledges that the teachers contract says the district will reimburse teachers for graduate-level courses. The disagreement comes in defining the requirements of a graduate-level course. "A traditional graduate-level course requires 45 hours of class time, textbooks, give-and-take with a teacher and other students, a midterm and a paper," Costello said.
NEWS
January 11, 1987 | By Barbara McCabe, Special to The Inquirer
The reimbursement of $12,500 in legal fees has given Narberth Borough officials reason to reconsider their plans to raise taxes this year. When council members adopted this year's $1.34 million budget in December, they voted to increase taxes by one mill - from 44 to 45 mills. Borough officials said the one-mill increase, which represents about $12,500 in revenue, was necessary to offset a portion of a $24,477 increase in expenditures over last year's $1.32 million budget.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | By Ellen Warren, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU The Associated Press contributed to this article
John H. Sununu, the former White House chief of staff who resigned after disclosures that he used government planes for ski weekends and trips to the dentist, was blistered again yesterday in a new government report and ordered to pay back an additional $4,242.80 for his travels. Sununu made the payments this week after a detailed and sharply critical study by the independent Office of Government Ethics, which concluded that he showed "a substantial lack of appreciation" that he - and not the government - should pay for plane and chauffeured car trips when not on official White House business.
NEWS
January 25, 2010 | By KITTY CAPARELLA, caparek@phillynews.com 215-854-5880
Tuition reimbursement was reinstated for the children of 1,500 unionized nurses and health-care professionals at the Temple University Health System by the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board last week. About 150 members, whose dependents had been using the benefit, should be reimbursed about $1 million, said Bill Cruice, chief negotiator for the Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals. Michael Horvitz, 59, an emergency-room nurse for 20 years, said that he had used the benefit to enhance his nursing education and that now his learning-disabled son planned to use it for his education.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2007 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A key contract for payment of mental-health services at Abington Memorial Hospital expired yesterday, leaving Independence Blue Cross and some Medicaid subscribers with the prospect of higher bills or disrupted care. Hospital officials said Abington's reimbursement rates from Magellan Behavioral Health have been fixed since 2002. Magellan administers managed-care mental-health plans for Blue Cross and several Medicaid HealthChoices plans. Last year, the hospital lost $1.2 million providing psychiatric care to Magellan patients, said Richard L. Jones Jr., Abington's president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
April 28, 1996 | By Justin Pritchard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A year ago, township administrators recommended reforming the expense accounts used by Haverford's commissioners - $4,800-a-year tabs that no other township in Delaware County gives its elected officials. Township records for 1995, however, show that while individual commissioners are requesting less reimbursement, they continue to provide little or no documentation for expenses. The accounts are still processed without close scrutiny. Members of the Board of Commissioners have used the expense reimbursements for repayment of purchases that appear personal or political.
NEWS
December 17, 1993 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's largest health insurer has informed doctors' groups that it will slash reimbursement rates by about 24 percent for childhood immunizations, starting Jan. 1. The move by Pennsylvania Blue Shield, done to help cut expenses, has been denounced as pennywise and pound foolish by physicians. Some pediatricians and family practitioners say it will force them to stop giving immunizations at the very time that government and health groups are trying to increase the number of children being vaccinated.
NEWS
April 19, 1993 | By Lara Wozniak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT Inquirer correspondent Louis R. Carlozo contributed to this article
All those trips back and forth, to and from Gloucester City and the Walt Whitman Bridge have taken their toll on the city's police and fire departments. Now, city officials say they want to be reimbursed for their efforts. Gloucester City provides numerous municipal services for the Delaware River Port Authority (DRPA), which operates the Walt Whitman Bridge, said City Administrator Ed Doczy. And with few exceptions, the city receives no reimbursement for its work, he said.
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BUSINESS
August 14, 2015 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania and other units of Rhode Island-based Citizens Financial Group have agreed to pay more than $30 million in restitution and penalties for not bothering to correct small deposit errors - up to $50 a transaction - for business and consumer customers from 2008 through 2013, federal bank regulators said Wednesday. "We are pleased to have resolved this matter from an earlier era," Citizens said in a statement, admitting that its past practices "could have been better.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgewater Park Township has agreed to pay $1,900 in legal fees incurred by a paid political researcher who sued over a delayed open-records request. Jim Logue, a Medford resident who works for the Burlington County Republican Committee, requested 15 years of public records - 21,500 pages - and filed suit when the township failed to provide them within 14 days. Looking for information on Edgewater Park Mayor Tom Pullion, a Democrat running this fall for the Burlington County Board of Freeholders, Logue asked for electronic copies of meeting minutes, ordinances, resolutions, bills, permits, cellphone records, payroll, property taxes, and grant applications, among other documents dating to 1999, when Pullion was first elected to the council.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
  In June, Anthony Capone said he liked his AmeriHealth Medicare Advantage plan so much he persuaded his 89-year-old mother and aunt to make the switch. Things were going along fine until recently, when the Mount Laurel businessman's renewal notice arrived in the mail. He opened the package and was taken aback. His monthly premium had spiked to $62 a month, a $23 rise. Other fees - in-hospital co-pay (up to $175), Part D deductible ($25), and ambulance ($100) - have also risen.
NEWS
June 19, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Deptford nursing home scrutinized by health officials for persistent issues has lost its federal agreement providing for Medicare and Medicaid payments, making its closing likely. All residents at the 139-bed Gloucester Manor Health Care Center receiving payments under the programs must leave the facility by Aug. 1, according to a letter sent to families late last week by the center's administrator. The Salina Road home has been on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' "Special Focus Facility" list for three years.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY, N.J. - The Ocean City Housing Authority has finally voted to reimburse the city nearly $1 million for fixing a public-housing development damaged by Sandy, and three members who objected immediately resigned. The city had used money from its affordable-housing funds to renovate the 60 units of Pecks Beach Village flooded during the October 2012 storm and was able to return displaced residents by February 2013. Mayor Jay Gillian has said he considered the preservation of the community - one of Ocean City's only affordable and racially mixed year-round housing areas - an urgent priority.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Tom Avril and Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writers
Among the weapons to treat the "wet" form of macular degeneration in 2012 were two potent drugs that are injected into the eye. Studies have found the two to be equally effective, yet Medicare pays doctors less than $50 to administer one and about $320 to inject the other. Which do you think doctors used more often? The costlier one, by far. Local ophthalmologists say that money isn't a factor in their decisions and that there are medical reasons to use the more expensive Lucentis for some patients.
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
A SUBURBAN contractor found to have bilked the city out of millions of dollars for shoddy road work will be forking over a hefty chunk of it back. Danella Companies Inc., of Plymouth Meeting, signed a no-fault agreement with the city and will pay more than $2 million to Philadelphia Gas Works, the Mayor's Office announced yesterday. The Office of the Inspector General began its investigation in 2010 at the behest of PGW, which spotted discrepancies in the amount of construction paving material for which Danella billed PGW and the amount of material that was actually installed.
NEWS
August 23, 2013 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania Auditor General Eugene DePasquale said Wednesday that an audit of the Chester Community Charter School found that it had received more than $1.2 million in improper lease-reimbursement payments. Noting that his office had found similar problems at six other charter schools in March, DePasquale called on the state Department of Education to enforce its own policies regarding lease payments to charter schools. "We're going to continue to bang away at this," he said in a telephone news conference about the Chester Community audit.
NEWS
July 25, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eight businesses have agreed to reimburse 185 Hurricane Sandy victims for overcharging them for emergency services, the state Attorney General's Office said Tuesday. The businesses include four hotels accused of raising room prices excessively as victims scrambled to find temporary housing. The others are gas stations sued for raising the price of fuel or merchandise when there was a high demand and long lines for gasoline. The $282,844 in settlements are the first involving hotel operators sued for raising prices during the state of emergency declared in October by Gov. Christie.
NEWS
July 19, 2013 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
TOMS RIVER, N.J. - Gov. Christie said Wednesday that he never encouraged homeowners to rebuild after Hurricane Sandy with the expectation that they would be reimbursed by the federal government. While the state said this week that 3,500 grants of up to $150,000 in federal aid money had been awarded, thousands more homeowners found out that they were declared ineligible or wait-listed. And those with more than 50 percent damage to their homes were told they would not be reimbursed for work already done.
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