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Relics

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NEWS
December 28, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Year's Day will provide a wide variety of traditional sales, highlighted by the sale of a major collection of American Indian stone relics. Blades, ax heads, drills, knives and points, as the tips of arrows and spears are called among collectors, will be offered at 1 p.m. Wednesday by the Conestoga Auction Co. near Manheim in Lancaster County. They range from a paleolithic point fragment to stone items that were still being used in the 1600s and 1700s when Europeans came to America, according to auctioneer Karl Boltz.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
His Bible rests in a small display case now, its cover and pages dog-eared and brittle from age and constant use. Nearby is the large pine pulpit that he made by hand and his tapestry- covered stools, showing wear from knees bent there in prayer more than 150 years ago. Here are the simple belongings of a man of faith and courage: Richard Allen, who emerged from slavery in the 1700s to found a church and fight for civil rights. The artifacts are part of a little-known collection in the rebuilt museum bearing Allen's name in the basement of Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, 419 S. Sixth St. in Center City.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn , Daily News Staff Writer
Touching, touching, reaching for the holiness. A white-haired woman pressed a bundle of holy objects to the Plexiglas that contained the relics of St. Therese of Lisieux. A curly haired boy flattened his palms against the glass. A man in a sport jacket held out a religious pamphlet, then knelt. A woman fanned a fistful of holy cards like a bridge hand and pushed them all forward. All day yesterday, they filed past the five-foot reliquary containing some bones of the much-venerated St. Therese, also known as Little Flower of Jesus, in a devotional at the Discalced Carmelite Monastery, 66th Avenue and Old York Road.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was creepy, and George M. Rees' 16-year-old daughter didn't like it. For years her father, an amateur relic hunter, had brought home stuff he dug up near the Antietam Civil War battlefield at Sharpsburg, Md.: Bullets, buttons, hunks of shrapnel - encrusted objects he had found in the dirt with his $450 metal detector. But this was different. This time he had brought a tiny crucifix and beads from a rosary, a religious medal, a rusted pocket knife and other things. They were a soldier's personal effects.
NEWS
August 7, 1988 | By Tom Linafelt, Special to The Inquirer
Birmingham Township's colonial history will be the subject of a $41,000 study. Surveys of buildings and artifacts, as well as a comprehensive account of the Battle of the Brandywine, are to be included in the study, authorized Monday by the Board of Supervisors. The study will be headed by Nancy Webster of Wallingford, an authority on the battle, with Martha Leigh Wolf of Birmingham, an architectural historian, and Betty Cousans-Zebooker of West Chester. All of the township south of Route 926 will be included in the study, which will be conducted through August 1989.
NEWS
March 22, 1992 | By Jaffer Ahmad, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Vacationing four years ago with his parents, Josh Wright was a 13-year-old kid with a good book to read in the back seat of the family car. The book was nonfiction, about Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, and Wright, already interested in history, soon was engrossed. Although Wright couldn't have known it, the real story was that his new- found fascination would begin a new chapter in his own life. For the last 13 months, Wright, now 17, has run a Civil War relics business from his parents' home in West Chester, buying and selling such things as swords, pistols and uniforms.
NEWS
December 1, 2009 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Karl Van Florcke sees it, the discovery of the centuries-old relics in the Delaware River was meant to be. The captain of the Army Corps of Engineers dredge McFarland was working on the vessel last month when its pumps were turned off for the day - at the precise moment that a piece of the nation's history was vacuumed up with tons of muck and debris. Less than 24 hours after the crew finished shipping-channel maintenance near Fort Mifflin in South Philadelphia, Van Florcke glanced up at the dredge's nine-foot-wide drag head and spotted something lodged in its grate.
NEWS
October 6, 1999 | by Ron Goldwyn, Daily News Staff Writer
The relics are coming - with a millennium's worth of weird tales and religious controversy. The bones of the Little Flower - St. Therese of Lisieux in France - arrived on American soil yesterday and will be the object of public veneration in Philadelphia by this weekend. To Roman Catholics, these bits of bone and hair and fingernail are tangible proof that a saintly person walked this earth, a holy man or woman who could intercede with God on behalf of the devout. To many non-Catholics, relics represent a ghoulish, body-snatching aspect of a religion whose mysterious rites and symbols seem to recall more superstitious times.
NEWS
May 23, 1993 | By Anne Tergesen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
From the outside, Jeffrey Norcross' white, two-story home looks like any other on the tree-lined Pennsauken street where he lives. But on the inside, the house resembles a museum. Old clay pipes from the Pine Barrens, bowls fashioned centuries ago by American Indians, fossilized sea urchins dug out of the South Jersey sand and other relics from across the country lie on dusty shelves in the densely packed basement and garage. And for every artifact Norcross has on display, hundreds more are carefully stowed away in crates.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The walled Carmelite monastery at 66th Street and Old York Road, where eight cloistered nuns live and pray beyond sight of the world, is a place where Pat Hosgood never thought to set foot. But yesterday, the mortal remains of St. Therese of Lisieux - one of the world's most popular Roman Catholic saints - were on display in the sanctuary of this North Philadelphia convent. And Hosgood was among the thousands of area residents who could not let this brief opportunity pass.
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NEWS
July 21, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2005, Melanie Krawiec of Oxford, Chester County, was experiencing the heartbreak of trying to have a second child but seeming unable to do so. A Catholic, she decided to pray to Pope John Paul II, who had died three days earlier. "I prayed for a sign that I would have another child," Krawiec said. Six months later, she learned she was pregnant. She would give birth to a lovely baby girl, Sophia. On Sunday morning, mother and daughter, now 8 years old, were at the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul in Philadelphia, where a relic of the late Polish pope, who was declared a saint in April, was on display for public veneration.
NEWS
December 31, 2013
Sunday's Year in Bells summary of restaurants reviewed in 2013 mistakenly omitted Honey's Sit 'N Eat South. Here is the missing capsule review: HONEY'S SIT 'N EAT SOUTH Rating: 2101 South St., 215-732-5130 www.honeyssitneat.com This Northern Liberties comfort-food hit brought its updated diner ethos to a branch in Fitler Square, a neighborhood in need of brunch and casual options. The big menu still had some inconsistencies during the review, but was strong on daily specials featuring seasonal flavors and ambitious entrees (trout amandine?
NEWS
December 16, 2012
Debra Nussbaum is an adjunct journalism professor at Rowan University When Emily Post penned her famous tome on etiquette in 1922, she never could have envisioned that, decades down the road, there would need to be many new chapters written on civility and manners, thanks to technology. E-mails, texts, Facebook messages, and tweets have presented modern dilemmas on what constitutes polite behavior. The biggest challenge for many of us may be figuring out when communicating electronically is just not appropriate.
NEWS
October 19, 2012 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
When he speaks about the men and women who participated in the War of Independence, Scott Stephenson refers to them as the "First Greatest Generation. " What they accomplished in opposing the tyranny of Britain, securing freedom for the colonies, and establishing a new nation based on noble ideals is at least as impressive as the feats of those warriors who protected the United States from the imperial ambitions of Germany and Japan during World War II. Unfortunately, the heroes of the American Revolution are so remote historically, and their achievements have become so mythologized, that figures like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson have become "marbleized" - elevated to near-saintly status, scrubbed of humanity and such mortal characteristics as fear, doubt, frustration, and fatigue.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
EXHIBITS Buddhist relic exhibit A rare collection of sacred Buddhist relics will be displayed this weekend. The pearl-like crystals were found among the ashes of cremated Buddhist masters. Practitioners believe they are physical embodiments of a master's spiritual qualities of compassion and wisdom. Living Buddhist masters from Burma, Indonesia, France, Thailand, Tibet, South Korea and Taiwan have contributed relics to the collection, including the Dalai Lama. Bo De Temple, 1114-20 S. 13th St., 6-8 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Raphael Satter, Associated Press
LONDON - It's a tantalizing find in a biblical mystery - Oxford University researchers have concluded that a set of skeletal remains that many Bulgarians attribute to John the Baptist probably belonged to a first-century male from the Middle East. While that doesn't prove that the bones belonged to the man revered by Christians as the forerunner to Jesus, it does mean that those who believe the relics are the remains of the first-century saint have a scientific case. The discovery of a sarcophagus containing a knuckle bone, a tooth, a skull fragment, and other remains under an ancient church on an island off Bulgaria's coast - paired with a small urn bearing a Greek-language reference to John the Baptist - drew enormous interest when it was announced two years ago. Officials didn't wait for scientific evaluation before offering the relics up for public view; thousands waited for hours to catch a glimpse of the bones when they were displayed in Sofia, Bulgaria's capital.
NEWS
February 28, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Long before animal-rights activists recently poured cold water on plans to revive the diving horse spectacle on the Steel Pier, animal acts were huge crowd pleasers along the city's famous Boardwalk. Beginning in the vaudeville era, myriad wacky acts were showcased on the resort's various entertainment piers, including waterskiing dog Rex, a family of boxing kangaroos, and boxing cats. Kangaroos boxed kangaroos (and the occasional human pugilist) and cats tangled with cats, with the animals wearing boxing gloves.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2012 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
A big sign off Route 73 in Winslow Township once directed music lovers into what seemed like just a wooded area with a few houses. But several blocks back, there was a seminal source of entertainment for mid-20th century African Americans, who often were excluded from mainstream events. "Back in those woods was my Daddy's Tippin Inn," said Helen Toomer Beverly, 76. "You turned off 73 and within a block, you could hear the music and smell my mother's fried chicken. Buses would come from Philadelphia and Atlantic City.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Darko Bandic, Associated Press
ZAGREB, Croatia - What becomes of a garden gnome hurled in fury at a windshield during a stormy breakup? Or a teddy bear that was once a Valentine's Day present? A wedding dress from a marriage gone awry? An ax that smashed through household furniture? All are on display at the Museum of Broken Relationships in the Croatian capital, each with a written testimony telling tales of passion, romance, and heartbreak. On Valentine's Day, visits to the museum almost double.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2011 | By Robert Strauss, For The Inquirer
It has become the memorial day no one wanted to have, but no one can quite ignore. The 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks comes this weekend with a variety of commemorations - some small and quiet, others long and ongoing. The anniversary will be marked as a solemn occasion in many towns. At the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the emphasis is on the everyday and personal meanings of the attacks. Working with the National September 11 Memorial and Museum at the World Trade Center, which will open next year in New York City, the Penn Museum assembled items from the Twin Towers excavation.
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