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Religion And Science

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NEWS
February 11, 1996 | By Art Caplan
As this nation lurches toward the next millennium, one wonders whether all the passengers in our little polity have had their tickets punched for the trip. It is hard to believe our society is ready to face the challenges of the 21st century when there are those among us still fighting the battles of the 19th. The teaching of evolution in the nation's schools is under attack again. Alabama is the primary battleground. To some, the earnest effort to dig up the intellectual grave of an issue long since settled seems harmless.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | By John Corr INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County churches are conducting special programs in observance of Lent. The question "Are Religion and Science in Conflict?" will be addressed at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday during a Lenten service at Centennial Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1330 Hare's Hill Rd., Kimberton. The service also will include the showing of the video Hashing it Out, which deals with religion and science. At Covenant Presbyterian Church, 400 Lancaster Ave., Malvern, the Wednesday Lenten service will explore the theme "Partying With the Saints.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How big is God? It's one of those cute bedtime questions a parent might answer with a simple-sounding, "He's everywhere. " But as Johnny drifts off to sleep, a thoughtful parent might wonder: Was my answer blasphemous pantheism? Anthropomorphic sexism? Scientific nonsense? Giving quantitative answers to religious questions has never been easy. Most theologians and scientists don't even try. But the Philadelphia Center for Religion and Science has for four years been trying to get thinkers on both sides of the divide into cosmic conversation, and the Radnor-based Templeton Foundation has just given $3 million to help it go global.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two professors from West Chester University who developed a course linking religion and science recently received a $10,000 award from the Center for Theology and Natural Sciences. Philosophy professor Frederick Struckmeyer and physics professor Anthony Nicastro will team-teach the course when it is offered next spring. The three-credit undergraduate course is the first to merge the two disciplines at West Chester University, Struckmeyer said. The topics will include historical background on the perceived conflict between religion and science, use of symbols and metaphors in religion and science, and evolution.
NEWS
April 6, 2000
On March 22 it was announced that Freeman Dyson, professor emeritus of mathematical physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, had been awarded the 28th annual Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion. Begun in 1973 by the mutual-fund financier Sir John Marks Templeton, the award is given to "a living individual who has shown extraordinary originality advancing the world's understanding of God and/or spirituality. " At $950,000, it is one of the wealthiest prizes in the world, surpassing the monetary value of the Nobel Prizes.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People have always pointed at the sky when talking of God. Now that we have learned to peer into that sky, to the very edges of the universe, are we any closer to glimpsing Him? In his best-selling book A Brief History of Time, British cosmologist Stephen Hawking attempted an answer. He had just finished explaining how the laws of physics created matter and started the clock of time, how the laws designed the planets, stars and galaxies, and how they drove the universe toward eternity.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
The Pennsylvania Pro Musica usually performs at Old Christ Church, and advance rumor had it that they had bitten off more than they could chew in staging yesterday's gala presentation of Joseph Haydn's oratorio The Creation at the Academy of Music. Not to worry: A more than respectably substantial crowd was on hand for the occasion, and that despite the fact that a competing Creation was scheduled for the same evening in Haddonfield. The Creation was the first large-scale vocal work to be published with the text in two languages, but Baron Gottfried van Swieten's English translation of his German libretto (itself based on a lost English original intended for Handel)
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A conference on "The Healing Power of Prayer" will be held Saturday and Sunday at the Baptist Church of West Chester. But for those interested in attending, don't expect to see a display of Oral Roberts-like laying on of hands. The main speaker at this conference will be Dale A. Matthews, an associate professor of medicine at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, who also has a private practice as an internist. The Rev. James T. Olsen, pastor of the church, said that the idea was to knock down the wall that has long separated religion and science.
NEWS
February 3, 2006
Last Sunday, Richard Dawkins, eminent zoologist and leading proponent of Darwinian evolution, wrote: "Religion may not be the root of all evil, but it is a serious contender. Even so it could be justified, if only its claims were true. But they are undermined by science and reason. Imagine a world where nobody is intimidated against following reason, wherever it leads. " To read Dawkins' piece, "Is religion the root of all evil?", visit http://go.philly.com/Dawkins. Edward Letzter Cherry Hill Much of Richard Dawkins' argument reduces to a simple formula: If all religious belief were eliminated, there would be no religious conflict.
NEWS
November 21, 2005 | By Charles Krauthammer
Because every few years this country, in its infinite tolerance, insists on hearing yet another appeal of the Scopes monkey trial, I feel obliged to point out what would otherwise be superfluous - that the two greatest scientists in history were Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein, and they were both religious. Newton's religiosity was traditional. He was a staunch believer in Christianity and was a member of the Church of England. Einstein's was a more diffuse belief in a deity who set the rules for everything that occurs in the universe.
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NEWS
February 3, 2006
Last Sunday, Richard Dawkins, eminent zoologist and leading proponent of Darwinian evolution, wrote: "Religion may not be the root of all evil, but it is a serious contender. Even so it could be justified, if only its claims were true. But they are undermined by science and reason. Imagine a world where nobody is intimidated against following reason, wherever it leads. " To read Dawkins' piece, "Is religion the root of all evil?", visit http://go.philly.com/Dawkins. Edward Letzter Cherry Hill Much of Richard Dawkins' argument reduces to a simple formula: If all religious belief were eliminated, there would be no religious conflict.
NEWS
November 21, 2005 | By Charles Krauthammer
Because every few years this country, in its infinite tolerance, insists on hearing yet another appeal of the Scopes monkey trial, I feel obliged to point out what would otherwise be superfluous - that the two greatest scientists in history were Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein, and they were both religious. Newton's religiosity was traditional. He was a staunch believer in Christianity and was a member of the Church of England. Einstein's was a more diffuse belief in a deity who set the rules for everything that occurs in the universe.
NEWS
October 18, 2005 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For centuries, religious believers have sought signs of God's designing hand in nature's mysteries - whether the orderly motions of the sun, moon and planets, the intricate beauty of an insect's wing, or the complexity of the human eye. Others say it's the nature of faith not to require evidence. The term intelligent design entered popular discourse recently, but the philosophy behind it goes back to antiquity. Some philosophers, theologians and religious scientists say the age-old battle unnecessarily pits religion against science, and religion tends to lose.
NEWS
February 18, 2002 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How big is God? It's one of those cute bedtime questions a parent might answer with a simple-sounding, "He's everywhere. " But as Johnny drifts off to sleep, a thoughtful parent might wonder: Was my answer blasphemous pantheism? Anthropomorphic sexism? Scientific nonsense? Giving quantitative answers to religious questions has never been easy. Most theologians and scientists don't even try. But the Philadelphia Center for Religion and Science has for four years been trying to get thinkers on both sides of the divide into cosmic conversation, and the Radnor-based Templeton Foundation has just given $3 million to help it go global.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Two professors from West Chester University who developed a course linking religion and science recently received a $10,000 award from the Center for Theology and Natural Sciences. Philosophy professor Frederick Struckmeyer and physics professor Anthony Nicastro will team-teach the course when it is offered next spring. The three-credit undergraduate course is the first to merge the two disciplines at West Chester University, Struckmeyer said. The topics will include historical background on the perceived conflict between religion and science, use of symbols and metaphors in religion and science, and evolution.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | By John Corr INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County churches are conducting special programs in observance of Lent. The question "Are Religion and Science in Conflict?" will be addressed at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday during a Lenten service at Centennial Evangelical Lutheran Church, 1330 Hare's Hill Rd., Kimberton. The service also will include the showing of the video Hashing it Out, which deals with religion and science. At Covenant Presbyterian Church, 400 Lancaster Ave., Malvern, the Wednesday Lenten service will explore the theme "Partying With the Saints.
NEWS
April 6, 2000
On March 22 it was announced that Freeman Dyson, professor emeritus of mathematical physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, had been awarded the 28th annual Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion. Begun in 1973 by the mutual-fund financier Sir John Marks Templeton, the award is given to "a living individual who has shown extraordinary originality advancing the world's understanding of God and/or spirituality. " At $950,000, it is one of the wealthiest prizes in the world, surpassing the monetary value of the Nobel Prizes.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
People have always pointed at the sky when talking of God. Now that we have learned to peer into that sky, to the very edges of the universe, are we any closer to glimpsing Him? In his best-selling book A Brief History of Time, British cosmologist Stephen Hawking attempted an answer. He had just finished explaining how the laws of physics created matter and started the clock of time, how the laws designed the planets, stars and galaxies, and how they drove the universe toward eternity.
NEWS
June 2, 1997 | By Kay Raftery, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A conference on "The Healing Power of Prayer" will be held Saturday and Sunday at the Baptist Church of West Chester. But for those interested in attending, don't expect to see a display of Oral Roberts-like laying on of hands. The main speaker at this conference will be Dale A. Matthews, an associate professor of medicine at the Georgetown University School of Medicine, who also has a private practice as an internist. The Rev. James T. Olsen, pastor of the church, said that the idea was to knock down the wall that has long separated religion and science.
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | By Art Caplan
As this nation lurches toward the next millennium, one wonders whether all the passengers in our little polity have had their tickets punched for the trip. It is hard to believe our society is ready to face the challenges of the 21st century when there are those among us still fighting the battles of the 19th. The teaching of evolution in the nation's schools is under attack again. Alabama is the primary battleground. To some, the earnest effort to dig up the intellectual grave of an issue long since settled seems harmless.
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