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July 4, 2011 | By William C. Kashatus
Two-hundred and thirty-five years ago, the Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence separating the American colonies from Great Britain. John Adams suggested that the occasion "ought to be celebrated as the day of deliverance with solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty from this time forward forever more. " Since then there has been a debate over whether the Founders envisioned the United States as a Christian nation. There is no easy answer. The Founders, like the American people, hailed from several religions, the majority being Protestant.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | By David Boldt, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Harvard economist Richard Freeman stumbled across data back in 1986 indicating that poor, inner-city youths who went to church were less likely to become delinquents, it was treated as, at most, a curiosity. "Almost nobody noticed," says Vanderbilt University criminologist Byron Johnson. Part of the reason was that it challenged the prevailing wisdom of the social-science community, which was that religion had little effect on behavior and that religiosity was mainly an indicator of low intellectual attainment, Johnson and others say. That view has changed dramatically.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By William F. Buckley Jr
The CBS program 60 Minutes recently devoted attention to the problem of teenage pregnancies. The narrator, Ed Bradley, stressed that although the program featured black promiscuity, the rise in white teenage pregnancies was very nearly as startling as among blacks. The protagonist of the documentary was a bright and articulate woman in her 30s. She and a black doctor had a well-developed thesis. It was as follows: a) Promiscuous teenage sexual activity in the United States is no greater than in Europe.
NEWS
March 30, 1995 | by Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Don't let the white collar fool you. Tom Bosley on "The Father Dowling Mysteries" and Clifton Davis on "Amen" might have worn the ecclesiastical duds, but like most Hollywood creations, they at best only hinted at anything religious. Except for the scattered Christmas specials or TV movies about cults, television shies away most things theological. When "The Flying Nun" debutted in 1967, Sally Field was Gidget in a habit. When "Kung Fu," a show promoting such Buddhist concepts as "oneness of all things" aired in the early '70s, there wasn't an episode that didn't feature monk Kwai Chang Caine (David Carradine)
NEWS
December 9, 1987 | By ELAINE ROSE
The U.S. government's officially-declared war against drugs seems to have cooled down a bit. We still see the ads and lapel buttons urging us to "just say no", but the fervor has declined. I doubt that this is because civil libertarians have convinced the authorities that universal random drug testing is neither effective nor desirable. It could be due to preoccupation with other crises, such as the stock market. More likely , people have come to realize that this "just say no" campaign will never work.
NEWS
April 21, 2013 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Again and again the grainy FBI videos flickered across TV screens Thursday, and the whole nation leaned in to study two nameless young men in backpacks. But their faces and clothing revealed nothing as they strolled toward the site of the Boston Marathon bombings. The alleged killers looked like two ordinary Americans in baseball caps. Then, overnight, came their names, news of a high-speed police chase, a fatal gun battle, and clues to their identities. They were immigrants.
NEWS
May 7, 1997 | By Jennifer Lin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just after Christmas, a dozen sisters from the Order of the Precious Blood were called to Beijing to meet Communist officials of China's Catholic Church. Teachers and social workers, the nuns belong to an order founded 75 years ago by Italian missionaries. Over five days of meetings, cordial but pointed, they received three strong messages: Don't oppose the Communist Party. Don't oppose the future, Beijing-backed government of Hong Kong. And don't try to influence the Catholic Church in China.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
The holiest day in Christendom approaches, and my little girl is anticipating coloring Easter eggs. She doesn't know from crucifixion or resurrection, and she has no clue of who Jesus, Judas, and Pilate were. That's because I never told her. I force vegetables, reading, and baths. But not God. As an agnostic, I haven't figured out what to say. Of course, if it's not cool to dictate faith, it's not cool to dictate nonbelief, either. Still, we religiously avoid church every Sunday.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | By BEN YAGODA, Daily News Movie Critic
"Salvation," a comedy starring Stephen McHattie, Dominique Davalos, Exene Cervenka and Viggo Mortensen. Directed by Beth B. Screenplay by Beth B and Tom Robinson. Running time: 80 minutes. A Circle Release. At the Roxy Screening Room. 'Salvation" is a strikingly charmless film, but you have to admit that it's a prescient one: Made well before the recent scandal involving Jim Bakker, Jessica Hahn and several hundred thousand dollars, it predicts those occurrences with remarkable accuracy.
NEWS
October 6, 2003 | MICHELLE MALKIN
THERE'S something terribly wrong when an American GI overseas can't get scriptures in the mail, but a Muslim chaplain can preach freely to al Qaeda and Taliban enemy combatants at Guantanamo Bay. This is a story of two soldiers, one Christian, one Muslim. It suggests how religious double standards and politically driven hypersensitivity threaten not only our troops, but us all. Six months ago, Jack Moody tried to send his son, Daniel, a care package containing a Bible study and other Christian materials.
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