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NEWS
April 15, 2012 | By Ed White, Associated Press
DETROIT - Some Detroit-area Muslims have been held at gunpoint, handcuffed, and repeatedly harassed about their religion when returning to the United States from Canada, according to a lawsuit that seeks to bar government agents from asking questions about religion. The Michigan branch of the Council on American-Islamic Relations said border agents and the FBI were violating the First Amendment and a 1993 federal law that guarantees freedom to practice religion. The lawsuit was filed Thursday in federal court in Detroit.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By E.J. Dionne Jr
The Easter season is a celebration of deliverance, and the liturgical calendar sets up Easter Week as a kind of catharsis. Holy Thursday and the Last Supper have an ominous feel because they are preparation for Good Friday and the dolorous story of Jesus' crucifixion. Yet two days later, the tale ends in triumph and resurrection. Whatever questions Christians may have about the meaning of that empty tomb, most of us have experienced a sense of joy when the words "He is risen, alleluia!"
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Adam Goldman and Matt Apuzzo, Associated Press
NEW YORK - The New York Police Department collected information on businesses owned by second- and third-generation Americans because they were Muslims, according to newly obtained secret documents. They show in the clearest terms yet that police were monitoring people based on religion, despite claims from Mayor Michael Bloomberg to the contrary. The NYPD has faced intense criticism from Muslims, lawmakers - even the FBI - for spying operations that put entire neighborhoods under surveillance.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Alain de Botton isn't exactly what you'd call religious. The Swiss-born philosopher and novelist has never been shy about proclaiming himself an unbeliever - a lifelong, dyed-in-the-wool atheist. But as he argues in his new book, Religion for Atheists: A Non-believer's Guide to the Uses of Religion (Pantheon; 320 pages; $26.95), de Botton does believe, passionately, in religion. Paradox? Folly? Madness? De Botton, who has been accused by critics of trading in the first and suffering from the other two, will speak about the book at the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia Sunday at 2 p.m. Born in Zurich, but living in Britain since his early teens, de Botton, 42, made a splash at 23 when his debut book, Essays in Love (published in America as On Love: A Novel )
NEWS
March 4, 2012
'Party for America' needed What is it with voters today? Gov. Corbett, Gov. Christie, and now Rick Santorum? God help us. They are masters of demagoguery. I see no light at the end of the tunnel. I am not happy with President Obama, but to repeal everything he has done is asinine. Without the bailouts, we would have been plunged back into the recession that we are gradually recovering from. I worked in the auto industry for 40 years, in good times and bad. The "ripple effect" of letting the auto industry fold would have been disastrous.
NEWS
February 19, 2012 | By Jill Lawless, Associated Press
LONDON - When it comes to religion, British politicians tend to heed the advice of Tony Blair's spin doctor, Alastair Campbell: "We don't do God. " In contrast to the United States, the deity is rarely invoked on the campaign trail or in political speeches. But a Muslim cabinet minister has become the latest member of Prime Minister David Cameron's government to urge the country to embrace its Christian heritage. Sayeeda Warsi also said "militant" secularism posed a threat to Europe, a comment that has angered atheists and highlighted the divisive political potential of religion.
NEWS
February 16, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
IF YOU were a friend of Gloria Mozil Simmons' and shared her curiosity about esoteric subjects like philosophy and religion, you might have been lucky enough to spend hours - often deep into the night - discussing such subjects. Her search for life's meaning eventually led her to the Jehovah's Witnesses, which offered her the truths she had always sought. And she wasn't just a member of the denomination. She pitched in with her customary energy and dedication, going door-to-door to spread the word and traveling extensively with the ministry.
NEWS
January 22, 2012
By Robert Wuthnow Princeton University Press. 488 pp. $35.00 Reviewed by Alexander Heffner In the 2008 election, to the surprise of many political analysts, Barack Obama made remarkable inroads in deeply entrenched Republican majorities, winning in North Carolina and closing the gap to five points in Georgia. But not in Kansas, where the Obama campaign took a 15-point defeat. Indeed, Kansas is possibly the most conservative-blooded state in the union. It also has voted Republican more consistently than any other state.
NEWS
January 13, 2012 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Christian Hernandez's legal problems began with an argument over religion. They ended Friday in prayer, with his mother on her knees in court, imploring God and a Philadelphia judge to spare her son from life in prison. "Dios mio, Dios mio!" cried Rosaria Fontanez, dropping to her knees at the bar of the court and raising her palms toward the ceiling. "Mi hijo, mi hijo!" But, as Common Pleas Court Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart explained, there was nothing he could do for her son. In Pennsylvania, a first-degree murder conviction mandates life in prison with no chance of parole.
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