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Religious Intolerance

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NEWS
May 9, 2005
Still grappling with a 2003 sexual-assault scandal, the U.S. Air Force Academy now faces charges that overzealous Christians are creating a culture of religious intolerance on its Colorado campus. Cadets have lodged 55 complaints of religious harassment since 2000, including a Jewish cadet being blamed for the death of Jesus and cadets who missed chapel being put into a "heathen flight. " Cadets feel pressured by faculty who reportedly led prayer before exams, signed newspaper ads promoting Jesus, and posted a banner proclaiming, "I am a member of Team Jesus Christ.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
ON SEPT. 7, my faith in the kindness of Philadelphians was restored! My car stalled at the bottom of a hill at Lansdowne Drive and Sweet Briar Road. There's really only a short shoulder and one lane going up to Girard Avenue. Cars are going straight, turning left, and there are only stop signs to slow down traffic. While I put my hazards on and awaited a tow truck, my sister and I counted 21 people, including a police officer, who stopped to see if we were alright, needed a jump or gave us helpful tips, like: "Put your hood up so people will know something's wrong" and "Don't sit in your car, stand on the side.
NEWS
March 3, 2006 | By Michael Cromartie and Elizabeth H. Prodromou
The government of Gen. Pervez Musharraf has been a key player in the Bush administration's efforts against al-Qaeda and Taliban remnants that have retreated into the largely impenetrable areas on the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. However, the Musharraf government has done little to combat Islamic extremists within Pakistan who promote violence and discrimination against religious minorities. When President Bush visits Pakistan tomorrow, he should remind Musharraf that his support for these groups is at odds with not only the protection of human rights but also with his commitment to fight terrorism.
NEWS
April 7, 2013
In 1918, in Reading, about 10 men and women founded the Huguenot Society of Pennsylvania, one of the first societies for the descendants of Huguenots established in the United States. Their first official meeting date was April 13, 1918, the 320th anniversary of Henry IV's Edict of Nantes, which ended the French Wars of Religion and gave the Huguenots limited religious freedom. The Huguenots were members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France from the 16th to 18th centuries, and many of them emigrated from France to escape persecution and religious intolerance.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Robert W. Tracinski
It crossed my mind (and many other minds) early in the Beltway Sniper case that this might be a terrorist attack. I reserved judgment, realizing - unlike the armchair experts who filled the cable news channels - that I did not know all the facts. But the moment I heard the suspect's name, John Muhammad, the conclusion was obvious. These killings were motivated by a version of the same Islamic ideology that has inspired mass murder around the globe. So why are the government and the mainstream media rushing to avoid that judgment?
NEWS
May 13, 2005
Freedom to speak Re: "Air Force Academy/No place for religious intolerance," editorial, May 9: Inappropriateness is not the same as intolerance. The editorial was right to say that instructors leading prayer in classrooms is questionable. People in power should never open themselves to the accusation (however false) of using their position improperly. But the editorial steps over the line into religious discrimination when it condemns evangelism by labeling it religious intolerance.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
CATHOLIC CHURCH'S JOURNEY IN AMERICA Perhaps our experience in the United States assisted the Roman Catholic Church in the evolution of its thoughts about church-state relations. Under an American government that constitutionally prohibited an established church, or state church, the Roman Catholic Church in the United States flourished. Often persecuted Roman Catholics from other parts of the world fled to the United States to be able to practice their faith freely. Certainly, the official religious tolerance of the United States attracted other persecuted religious groups, like the Jews and some groups of Protestants.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
It's tempting to ignore a Florida pastor's plans to burn copies of the Quran, and deny him the publicity he so obviously craves. But the Rev. Terry Jones would pursue his lunatic-fringe stunt whether it was attended by a solitary blogger or a convoy of satellite TV trucks. Jones' brand of malevolence must be condemned whenever it slithers into the light of day. Saturday is the ninth anniversary of 9/11. Jones, pastor of a church with the incongruous name of Dove World Outreach Center, thinks it is fitting to mark the occasion by torching 200 copies of the sacred text of the Islamic faith.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
By Babak Ashrafi Philadelphians celebrate the city's well-known place in political history, but we tend to forget our equally exceptional and fascinating scientific heritage. The same Enlightenment ideas that animated the Founding Fathers' creation of the United States also motivated many of them to apply reason toward understanding the natural world. As we prepare for a future increasingly driven by science, technology, and medicine, our history in those fields can provide invaluable perspective.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 7, 2013
In 1918, in Reading, about 10 men and women founded the Huguenot Society of Pennsylvania, one of the first societies for the descendants of Huguenots established in the United States. Their first official meeting date was April 13, 1918, the 320th anniversary of Henry IV's Edict of Nantes, which ended the French Wars of Religion and gave the Huguenots limited religious freedom. The Huguenots were members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France from the 16th to 18th centuries, and many of them emigrated from France to escape persecution and religious intolerance.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Thomas J. Sheeran, Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Sixteen Amish men and women were convicted Thursday of hate crimes for a series of hair- and beard-cutting attacks on fellow sect members in a religious dispute that offered a rare glimpse into the closed and usually self-regulating community of believers. A federal jury found Samuel Mullet, 66, leader of the breakaway group, guilty of orchestrating the cuttings last fall in an attempt to shame mainstream members of his community who he believed were straying from their beliefs.
NEWS
December 18, 2011
Jonathan Turley is a professor of public interest law at George Washington University Last week in Washington, the United States hosted an international conference obliquely titled "Expert Meeting on Implementing the U.N. Human Rights Resolution 16/18. " The impenetrable title conceals the disturbing agenda: to establish international standards for, among other things, criminalizing "intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of . . . religion and belief. " The unstated enemy of religion in this conference is free speech, and the Obama administration is facilitating efforts by Muslim countries to "deter" some speech in the name of human rights.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
By Babak Ashrafi Philadelphians celebrate the city's well-known place in political history, but we tend to forget our equally exceptional and fascinating scientific heritage. The same Enlightenment ideas that animated the Founding Fathers' creation of the United States also motivated many of them to apply reason toward understanding the natural world. As we prepare for a future increasingly driven by science, technology, and medicine, our history in those fields can provide invaluable perspective.
NEWS
September 13, 2010
ON SEPT. 7, my faith in the kindness of Philadelphians was restored! My car stalled at the bottom of a hill at Lansdowne Drive and Sweet Briar Road. There's really only a short shoulder and one lane going up to Girard Avenue. Cars are going straight, turning left, and there are only stop signs to slow down traffic. While I put my hazards on and awaited a tow truck, my sister and I counted 21 people, including a police officer, who stopped to see if we were alright, needed a jump or gave us helpful tips, like: "Put your hood up so people will know something's wrong" and "Don't sit in your car, stand on the side.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
It's tempting to ignore a Florida pastor's plans to burn copies of the Quran, and deny him the publicity he so obviously craves. But the Rev. Terry Jones would pursue his lunatic-fringe stunt whether it was attended by a solitary blogger or a convoy of satellite TV trucks. Jones' brand of malevolence must be condemned whenever it slithers into the light of day. Saturday is the ninth anniversary of 9/11. Jones, pastor of a church with the incongruous name of Dove World Outreach Center, thinks it is fitting to mark the occasion by torching 200 copies of the sacred text of the Islamic faith.
NEWS
March 3, 2006 | By Michael Cromartie and Elizabeth H. Prodromou
The government of Gen. Pervez Musharraf has been a key player in the Bush administration's efforts against al-Qaeda and Taliban remnants that have retreated into the largely impenetrable areas on the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. However, the Musharraf government has done little to combat Islamic extremists within Pakistan who promote violence and discrimination against religious minorities. When President Bush visits Pakistan tomorrow, he should remind Musharraf that his support for these groups is at odds with not only the protection of human rights but also with his commitment to fight terrorism.
NEWS
May 13, 2005
Freedom to speak Re: "Air Force Academy/No place for religious intolerance," editorial, May 9: Inappropriateness is not the same as intolerance. The editorial was right to say that instructors leading prayer in classrooms is questionable. People in power should never open themselves to the accusation (however false) of using their position improperly. But the editorial steps over the line into religious discrimination when it condemns evangelism by labeling it religious intolerance.
NEWS
May 9, 2005
Still grappling with a 2003 sexual-assault scandal, the U.S. Air Force Academy now faces charges that overzealous Christians are creating a culture of religious intolerance on its Colorado campus. Cadets have lodged 55 complaints of religious harassment since 2000, including a Jewish cadet being blamed for the death of Jesus and cadets who missed chapel being put into a "heathen flight. " Cadets feel pressured by faculty who reportedly led prayer before exams, signed newspaper ads promoting Jesus, and posted a banner proclaiming, "I am a member of Team Jesus Christ.
NEWS
October 31, 2002 | By Robert W. Tracinski
It crossed my mind (and many other minds) early in the Beltway Sniper case that this might be a terrorist attack. I reserved judgment, realizing - unlike the armchair experts who filled the cable news channels - that I did not know all the facts. But the moment I heard the suspect's name, John Muhammad, the conclusion was obvious. These killings were motivated by a version of the same Islamic ideology that has inspired mass murder around the globe. So why are the government and the mainstream media rushing to avoid that judgment?
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