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Religious Leaders

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NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Katherine Shaver, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Religious leaders from across the country gathered Saturday at Washington National Cathedral to call for a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, as well as more attention to poverty-related problems underlying gun violence in inner cities. The meeting, part of a four-day "gun violence prevention sabbath," was broadcast via a live Web stream to about 400 congregations around the United States, including some that held similar events locally, organizers said.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Four religious leaders - representing blacks, Protestants, Roman Catholics and Jews - have denounced racially-oriented comments made by attorney Charles Bowser in a recent newsletter about mayoral candidate Edward G. Rendell and Rendell's supporters. In a statement issued yesterday, the religious leaders said Bowser's commentary "unfortunately has confirmed the fears of many Philadelphians regarding the injection of racism into the mayoral campaign. " "We, blacks and whites together, oppose such efforts to divide the community by color," they said.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nobody knows the needs of a community better than its churches, mosques and synagogues, declared a gathering of clergy at yesterday's volunteer summit. But, they said, nobody has financial resources like the government and business. So what society needs now is a new partnership of church, government and business, the religious leaders agreed. "We need partnerships in the religious community," Gov. Don Sundquist of Tennessee told about 250 religious leaders and activists convened at the Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel.
NEWS
December 5, 2010 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Religious leaders from across Camden called on Gov. Christie on Saturday to meet with community and local government leaders in an attempt to resolve a financial crisis that has resulted in layoff notices to about half of the city's police officers and firefighters. Two days after City Council approved the cuts and a day after Christie engaged in a verbal clash with some city leaders, members of Camden Churches Organized for People (CCOP) held a news conference on the steps of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church on Market Street.
NEWS
May 16, 2007 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While some religious leaders in the Philadelphia area saw a good side of the Rev. Jerry Falwell, others said he was too divisive and not representative of Christianity. "Some people in my community said he was racist, and maybe he was," the Rev. Herb Lusk, pastor of Greater Exodus Baptist Church in North Philadelphia, said yesterday. "But when I met him he was the kindest and most affectionate, caring person I've ever met. " Mr. Falwell spoke last year at Lusk's church. "The guy always fought for what he believed to be right," Lusk said.
NEWS
August 19, 1988 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 20 local religious leaders screened the controversial movie The Last Temptation of Christ yesterday, and their reaction was a far cry from the hostility the film has generated elsewhere. While some religious leaders in other areas have criticized the movie as blasphemous and protested its release, those watching yesterday differed widely on what they liked and what they didn't - but said they found no reason to urge others not to see it. The movie opens today at the Ritz Five theater.
NEWS
September 17, 2001 | By Dale Mezzacappa and Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Many religious leaders and antiwar groups remain steadfast in urging peace and reconciliation rather than revenge. Some warn that responding in kind will be the ultimate victory for the terrorists - by making us like them. "We can deny them their victory by refusing to submit to a world created in their image," said a statement released by the National Council of Churches and signed by 210 religious leaders as of Friday night. "Terrorism inflicts not only death and destruction but also emotional oppression to further its aims.
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | By David O'Reilly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rare is the religious organization without volunteers. They organize church basketball camps. They arrange the altar flowers, call the sick, polish the menorah, mail the pledge envelopes, paint the youth hall, feed the hungry and teach the little ones about Noah's ark. Congregational life would scarcely function without the goodwill and unpaid work of volunteers. But as presidents and corporations and movie stars gather in Philadelphia to celebrate volunteerism, local religious leaders are warning that volunteers can't replace government in the fight against poverty.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Bill Barrow, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Former President Jimmy Carter says religious leaders, including those in Christianity and Islam, share the blame for mistreatment of women across the world. The human-rights activist said Friday that religious authorities have perpetuated misguided doctrines of male superiority, from the Catholic Church's forbidding women from becoming priests to some African cultures' mutilating the genitals of young girls. Carter said the doctrines, which he described as theologically indefensible, contribute to a political, social, and economic structure where political leaders passively accept violence against women, a worldwide sex-slave trade, and inequality in the workplace and classroom.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summoned to worship by a Muslim chant, representatives of Philadelphia's religious community - including bishops, rabbis, imams and ministers - gathered yesterday in an old Quaker meetinghouse to pray for an end to racism and bigotry. They also signed a document calling on Philadelphians to observe Mayor Goode's proclamation of October as Human Relations Month by recalling that "each of us, created in the divine image, is worthy of respect and deserving of dignity. " More than 20 religious leaders gathered at the Free Quaker Meetinghouse, Fifth and Arch Streets, for a noon worship service sponsored by the Inter- Faith Support Group of the Philadelphia Commission on Human Relations.
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NEWS
June 5, 2015 | BY ANNIE PALMER, Daily News Staff Writer palmera@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
SARINA SANTOS can't remember the last time she could afford to take her family out to dinner. What's fresh in her mind is the day, three weeks ago, when she was fired from her job as a baggage handler at Philadelphia International Airport. As a baggage handler, Santos was employed by PrimeFlight Aviation Services, a Nashville-based company that provides baggage handling, aircraft and terminal services to more than 40 airports across the country. Santos said she was fired from PrimeFlight on May 5 because she fought for higher wages - employees currently earn $7.25 per hour, which is below the city's minimum wage of $12. Her attendance, which she had been previously warned about, was cited by supervisors as the reason for her dismissal, she said.
NEWS
June 5, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local religious leaders and others marched Wednesday in support of a former baggage handler at Philadelphia International Airport who contends she lost her job for speaking out about low wages. Sarina Santos, 30, of Frankford was supported by about 50 members of POWER - Philadelphians Organized to Witness, Empower and Rebuild. Participants gathered after the noon mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul and marched to Dilworth Park for a vigil, where prayers and speeches on a fair living wage were delivered.
NEWS
July 1, 2013 | By Bill Barrow, Associated Press
ATLANTA - Former President Jimmy Carter says religious leaders, including those in Christianity and Islam, share the blame for mistreatment of women across the world. The human-rights activist said Friday that religious authorities have perpetuated misguided doctrines of male superiority, from the Catholic Church's forbidding women from becoming priests to some African cultures' mutilating the genitals of young girls. Carter said the doctrines, which he described as theologically indefensible, contribute to a political, social, and economic structure where political leaders passively accept violence against women, a worldwide sex-slave trade, and inequality in the workplace and classroom.
NEWS
June 29, 2013
Woman indicted in ricin mailings TEXARKANA, Texas - A Texas woman was indicted Friday on charges that she sent ricin-laced letters to President Obama and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg in an attempt to frame her estranged husband, federal prosecutors said. Shannon Richardson, 35, is charged with two counts of mailing a threatening communication and one count of making a threat against the president of the United States, the U.S. Attorney's Office said in a news release. Richardson, an actress from New Boston, Texas, was arrested June 7. The government accused her of mailing the letters and trying to pin the crime on Nathan Richardson, the man she married in 2011.
NEWS
March 18, 2013 | By Katherine Shaver, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Religious leaders from across the country gathered Saturday at Washington National Cathedral to call for a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, as well as more attention to poverty-related problems underlying gun violence in inner cities. The meeting, part of a four-day "gun violence prevention sabbath," was broadcast via a live Web stream to about 400 congregations around the United States, including some that held similar events locally, organizers said.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By John Christoffersen, Associated Press
NEWTOWN, Conn. - Religious leaders from different faiths gathered Friday on a windswept, snowy soccer field to mark two weeks since the Connecticut elementary school massacre and pray for healing. A few dozen residents joined representatives from Roman Catholic, Episcopal, Methodist, Congregational, Buddhist, Muslim, and other places of worship. "Your faith leaders want you to know that we continue to stand with you as we all continue to deal with this great tragedy that has befallen our beloved community of Newtown," said the Rev. Jack Tanner, of Newtown Christian Church.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
By Joshua E. Keating The Vatican announced this week that Pope Benedict XVI will begin tweeting under the handle @Pontifex. Though his first Tweet is not expected until Dec. 12, the English-language papal account already has more than 112,000 followers. "We are going to get a spiritual message," said Greg Burke, senior media adviser to the Vatican. "The pope is not going to be walking around with a BlackBerry or an iPad, and no one is going to be putting words into the pope's mouth.
NEWS
October 28, 2012
Paul Kurtz, 86, a philosopher whose advocacy of reason ahead of faith helped define contemporary secular humanism, died Saturday at home in Amherst, N.Y., of complications from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Mr. Kurtz taught philosophy at the University at Buffalo, part of the State University of New York, from 1965 until his retirement in 1991. But his wider influence came as founder in 1969 of Prometheus Books, a publisher of books and magazines devoted to fact-based, rather than faith-based, solutions to human problems.
NEWS
September 6, 2012 | By Samantha Henry, Associated Press
NEWARK, N.J. - The state attorney general assured a group of Muslim leaders Wednesday that a New York City police unit that conducted surveillance of Muslim businesses, religious leaders, and student groups was no longer operating in New Jersey. Jeffrey Chiesa made the remarks during the first meeting of an outreach committee he formed to repair relations between law enforcement and Muslims in the wake of revelations about the New York Police Department's surveillance tactics. Paul Loriquet, a spokesman for the attorney general, confirmed that Chiesa said during the closed-door meeting that the NYPD's Demographics Unit was no longer working in New Jersey.
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Hyung-jin Kim, Associated Press
GAPYEONG, South Korea - The Rev. Sun Myung Moon, 92, the self-proclaimed messiah who turned his Unification Church into a worldwide religious movement and befriended North Korean leaders as well as U.S. presidents, died Sunday, church officials said. Mr. Moon died at a church-owned hospital near his home in Gapyeong, northeast of Seoul, two weeks after being hospitalized with pneumonia, Unification Church spokesman Ahn Ho-yeul told the Associated Press. His wife and children were at his side, Ahn said.
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