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Religious Organizations

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BUSINESS
September 21, 2001 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Valerie J. Munson's religious lawyering lands her somewhere between the sacred and the profane. Sacred: A rebellious former Episcopalian parish struggles to hang onto its church buildings in North Philadelphia. Munson will defend the parish, St. James the Less, in a suit brought against it in the summer by the Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania, which believes it owns the buildings. The profane? A pastor, transferred out of state, struggles to hang onto his flashy, late-model red Jaguar, leased in the name of his former church.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Supreme Court, once again addressing the issue of separation of church and state, agreed yesterday to decide the constitutionality of a 1981 law that gives religious groups money to counsel teenagers on sex and pregnancy. The court will hear arguments this term on the Adolescent Family Life Act, a portion of which was found unconstitutional in April by a federal court. It allows religious organizations to use government funds for counseling and teaching adolescents on matters related to premarital sexual relations and teenage pregnancy.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
PRESIDENT OBAMA speaks the language of faith fluently, but he also understands the Constitution. During the campaign, he promised to keep the line between church and state clean. But when Obama signed an executive order to create his administration's version of an Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, all hell broke loose - at least among some civil libertarians. They charged that Obama had broken a campaign vow to prevent taxpayer-funded religious organizations from discrimination in hiring.
NEWS
June 1, 2012
Christine Flowers hits a new low, even by her abysmal standards, in her column laughably titled "Christian Soldiers Fight Birth-Control Dictum. " Despite her intentions, Ms. Flowers has not remotely provided a coherent argument for the Catholic lawsuits challenging requirements in the Affordable Care Act. Ms. Flowers rightly says, "Some of us thought this had already been settled when the administration caved to public outrage, saying...
NEWS
July 10, 2008
NEARLY EVERY misgiving about the Bush administration's signature "faith-based initiative" turned out to be prophetic: The program did indeed allow federal dollars to support religious discrimination in employment and in the provision of social services. Faith-based organizations did use government money to proselytize. Federal grants were targeted for their political usefulness to congressional Republicans. And religious organizations vying for a few thousand dollars in grants did in fact lower the volume of their moral critique of the government.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
I'VE BEEN reading a lot about religious organizations being upset regarding the film of "The Da Vinci Code. " While I understand that many religious people feel they are defending their religious beliefs by speaking out, I wonder when they are going to realize that all they end up doing is giving this film (and others like it, past and future) untold free publicity. They will surely create a segment of the population who will see the movie simply because it's being branded as controversial.
NEWS
August 21, 2001
THE MOST REASSURING thing about the constitutional swamp created by President Bush's "faith-based initiative" was its leadership: respected Penn professor John DiIulio. DiIulio's frustrating trek through this Washington bog has reaffirmed most of our misgivings about the notion that you can provide government money to religious organizations without compromising both government and religion. Now that DiIulio has resigned, citing commuter's exhaustion, a short history of his short tenure suggests that the devil really was in the details.
NEWS
September 20, 1995 | by J. Brent Walker, New York Times
Congress should fix the welfare system, not add new flaws. But an obscure provision in a Senate Republican reform package would funnel public subsidies to churches to provide welfare benefits. Such church-and- state financial linkage is most likely unconstitutional and would actually harm religion. Sponsored by Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole and John Ashcroft of Missouri, this provision would radically change how religious organizations provide day care, hot meals and emergency shelter.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
A request to use a house on Park Avenue as the headquarters for a religious organization has met with opposition from the Swarthmore Borough Planning Commission. At a regular commission meeting Wednesday night, the commission unanimously rejected the plan and recommended that the borough council deny the request. The plan - which was submitted by Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship - would allow that organization to use a house at 200 Park Ave. as an administrative office. Dwight Wagner, a real-estate broker with Jackson-Cross Co. Realtors in Philadelphia, said that Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship had reached an agreement of sale with Elinor and Woodrow Furst, owners of the property.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By George F. Will
The "chastity law" caused the Supreme Court to split narrowly, 5-4, and neatly, conservatives against liberals. The liberals lost, but they were right. The conservatives won with judicial activism, disregarding a long line of precedents. And the case illustrates the problematic nature of the conservative aspiration to nurture religious involvement in public policy. In 1981, with conservatism ascendant, Congress passed the Adolescent Family Life Act (AFLA) to provide grants to various organizations for services and research concerning premarital adolescent sexual behavior.
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NEWS
November 6, 2013 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Sen. Pat Toomey (R., Pa.) voted Monday to advance a bill to ban workplace discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity, supporting the measure after intense backroom talks that spilled into open view. Toomey, one of seven Republicans to back the bill, waited and negotiated as the bill stood at 59 votes - on the brink of clearing a key procedural hurdle. He voted in favor of it immediately after it received the 60th vote it needed. He then cast the 61st vote vote in favor of the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA)
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | Ronnie Polaneczky
Ever since Mayor Nutter's ban on feeding homeless people on Benjamin Franklin Parkway went into effect June 1, I've been worried about Violet Little.   After all, she's been nourishing the Parkway's homeless for two years. But her meals are heartier than chunky chili or cheesy ziti. I fret that her mission might be at risk. A Lutheran minister, Little is pastor of the Welcome Church, which she founded as "a church without walls," since no bricks or mortar shelter its inhabitants.
NEWS
June 1, 2012
Christine Flowers hits a new low, even by her abysmal standards, in her column laughably titled "Christian Soldiers Fight Birth-Control Dictum. " Despite her intentions, Ms. Flowers has not remotely provided a coherent argument for the Catholic lawsuits challenging requirements in the Affordable Care Act. Ms. Flowers rightly says, "Some of us thought this had already been settled when the administration caved to public outrage, saying...
NEWS
May 25, 2012 | Christine Flowers
Finally, my church spoke truth to power, and fired a legal — and most likely lethal — shot against an oppressive, unconstitutional requirement that Catholics be forced to subsidize sin. True, not everyone thinks that artificial birth control is sinful, and that would include about the 98% of Catholic women who use it. But it's one thing to say that you as an individual disagree with a fundamental church principle, and quite another...
NEWS
February 22, 2012 | By Joe Mandak, Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - A college in Western Pennsylvania sued the federal government Tuesday, saying regulations that require employers to offer birth-control coverage that includes drugs that abort fertilized embryos are "directly at odds" with its religious values, including the Sixth Commandment. The Alliance Defense Fund filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court on behalf of Geneva College. The school in Beaver Falls is associated with the Reformed Presbyterian Church of North America.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By George Parry
Those bitter clingers to religion continue to frustrate President Obama. Having decreed that faith-based organizations must violate their religious tenets by providing health insurance for abortion and sterilization, he seems surprised by the resulting uproar. Like Dian Fossey watching gorillas in the mist, Obama appears to be adjusting his pith helmet, peering through his binoculars, and wondering why the primates are agitated - and how he can stop their insufferable screeching about moral principles and religious freedom.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Anne Flaherty, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Conservatives said Sunday that the flap surrounding President Obama's birth control mandate was far from over, with Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell saying he would push to overturn the requirement because it was another example of government meddling. While a senior White House official shrugged off such remarks, declaring the issue resolved and new legislation unlikely, the rhetoric from Republicans suggested the GOP would try to keep the debate alive in an election year to rally conservatives and seize on voter frustration with big government.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
PRESIDENT OBAMA speaks the language of faith fluently, but he also understands the Constitution. During the campaign, he promised to keep the line between church and state clean. But when Obama signed an executive order to create his administration's version of an Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, all hell broke loose - at least among some civil libertarians. They charged that Obama had broken a campaign vow to prevent taxpayer-funded religious organizations from discrimination in hiring.
NEWS
July 10, 2008
NEARLY EVERY misgiving about the Bush administration's signature "faith-based initiative" turned out to be prophetic: The program did indeed allow federal dollars to support religious discrimination in employment and in the provision of social services. Faith-based organizations did use government money to proselytize. Federal grants were targeted for their political usefulness to congressional Republicans. And religious organizations vying for a few thousand dollars in grants did in fact lower the volume of their moral critique of the government.
NEWS
May 17, 2006
I'VE BEEN reading a lot about religious organizations being upset regarding the film of "The Da Vinci Code. " While I understand that many religious people feel they are defending their religious beliefs by speaking out, I wonder when they are going to realize that all they end up doing is giving this film (and others like it, past and future) untold free publicity. They will surely create a segment of the population who will see the movie simply because it's being branded as controversial.
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