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Religious Studies

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NEWS
March 26, 1999 | By Louise Harbach, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Eight years after establishing the Center for the Study of American Religion, Princeton University is expanding study of the topic worldwide. On Monday, the university will launch the newly renamed Center for the Study of Religion. The center will continue the work of scholars studying religion in the United States while adding the study of religion in other countries. "We believe that religion is the most understudied social phenomenon of the 20th century," said sociology professor Robert Wuthnow, who will be the center's director.
NEWS
October 21, 2014
An article in Sunday's Inquirer misidentified William Madges of St. Joseph's University. He is a professor of theology and religious studies. An article in the Sports section of Sunday's Inquirer about the Phillies' Dick Allen was accompanied by an incorrect photo of him. The correct photo appears above.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last dozen years, Donald R. Schultz would take donations, often at Christmas, to the Tzotzil Indians in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. "This last Christmas, I had to beg and plead with him not to go" because cancer had weakened him, his son, Erik, said in an interview. He didn't go. The former Jesuit seminarian and Villanova University theology teacher had a special concern for the Indians of Chiapas, 45 of whom had been massacred Dec. 22, 1997, by paramilitary forces.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE
BRAD LIDGE jogged in from the bullpen at Citizens Bank Park as "Soldiers" blared from the speakers. Carlos Ruiz was ready behind the plate. Prior to last night's game, Lidge threw the ceremonial first pitch on the eve of the first day of the Phillies Alumni Weekend. Lidge, 36, who recorded 100 saves as a Phillies including running off a perfect 41 in a row in 2008, officially retired as a Phillie earlier in the day. "I always knew in my mind I'd be coming back to Philly somehow, some way," Lidge said.
NEWS
October 12, 1993 | By Howard Goodman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Saying that streamlining is needed in a time of tight budgets, the dean of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Arts and Sciences has recommended closing three departments: religious studies, American civilization and regional science. Dean Rosemary A. Stevens has also urged that the Astronomy Department be folded into the Physics Department and that the Slavic Languages Department be placed in "receivership," with new leaders named from outside the department. Professors in the affected departments have denounced the plan as a threat to educational quality, but Stevens has maintained otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jesus of Nazareth was not a religious prophet with a message of peace and universal love - much less the Son of God. He was a revolutionary, a Jewish resistance fighter who worked to overthrow Israel's Roman rulers. So writes comparative religionist Reza Aslan in Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth , which he will discuss at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. (A limited number of tickets are still available.) As radical as this may sound, Aslan's theory is hardly new or particularly revolutionary.
NEWS
May 8, 2000 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Thomas V. Matusiak, 57, a former religious studies instructor at La Salle University who owned several Hallmark greeting card shops in Delaware County and Delaware, died of a heart ailment Wednesday while working out at his gym. He lived in West Chester. Mr. Matusiak had been wed in a "Millennium Marriage" on New Year's Day in church to the former Nancy Reynolds of Malvern. That wedding was three years almost to the day after her previous husband, a flight instructor, had been killed in a small plane crash at the Perkiomen Valley Airport in Montgomery County.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE MIGHT not be many jokes in the Bible, but all those fortunate enough to have studied religion at Villanova University under Donald Robert "Dutch" Schultz were assured of plenty of laughs. This jovial professor was one of the most popular teachers at the university, revered for his rich sense of humor and knowledge of his subject. Dutch Schultz died of cancer Feb. 15, at age 84, in Cornville, Ariz., where he and his wife, Juanita Quigley Schultz, had been living since he retired in 1991.
NEWS
October 12, 1993 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Regular faculty meetings in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania usually attract 20 to 25 members. A much larger crowd is likely to turn out today at 4 p.m. seeking explanations behind a "streamlining" move to disband three academic departments, and reasons why faculty members weren't better notified about it. Arts and Sciences Dean Rosemary Stevens recommended to the university's board of trustees that the...
NEWS
April 10, 1996 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Rabbi Seth L. Brody, 40, assistant professor of religion at Haverford College, died Monday at Pennsylvania Hospital after a brief battle with cancer. He taught until being diagnosed with cancer two weeks ago. A Cherry Hill resident, Rabbi Brody began teaching at Haverford in 1991, the same year he received his doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania's department of religious studies. "I think he brought to the students a passion for the study of how religions offer people a way of understanding the meaning of their lives," said Michael Sells, chairman of Haverford College department of religion.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 21, 2014
An article in Sunday's Inquirer misidentified William Madges of St. Joseph's University. He is a professor of theology and religious studies. An article in the Sports section of Sunday's Inquirer about the Phillies' Dick Allen was accompanied by an incorrect photo of him. The correct photo appears above.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jesus of Nazareth was not a religious prophet with a message of peace and universal love - much less the Son of God. He was a revolutionary, a Jewish resistance fighter who worked to overthrow Israel's Roman rulers. So writes comparative religionist Reza Aslan in Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth , which he will discuss at the Free Library of Philadelphia's Central Library Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. (A limited number of tickets are still available.) As radical as this may sound, Aslan's theory is hardly new or particularly revolutionary.
SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE
BRAD LIDGE jogged in from the bullpen at Citizens Bank Park as "Soldiers" blared from the speakers. Carlos Ruiz was ready behind the plate. Prior to last night's game, Lidge threw the ceremonial first pitch on the eve of the first day of the Phillies Alumni Weekend. Lidge, 36, who recorded 100 saves as a Phillies including running off a perfect 41 in a row in 2008, officially retired as a Phillie earlier in the day. "I always knew in my mind I'd be coming back to Philly somehow, some way," Lidge said.
NEWS
May 12, 2013
Communal dash down city's spine As a slow runner, I had nearly two hours to take all of us in: black ladies emerging from Sunday services, white guys from Bryn Mawr holding kids, hipsters with PBR tall boys in paper bags, Mafioso types in beach chairs smoking cigars, the Temple band and football team, and Ed Rendell. We were different races, ethnicities, and sexual orientations. We were young and old, fat and skinny, prissy and crass. Most days, we take the same paths to work, and go to the same pubs, coffee shops, and same corner stores.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Over the last dozen years, Donald R. Schultz would take donations, often at Christmas, to the Tzotzil Indians in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. "This last Christmas, I had to beg and plead with him not to go" because cancer had weakened him, his son, Erik, said in an interview. He didn't go. The former Jesuit seminarian and Villanova University theology teacher had a special concern for the Indians of Chiapas, 45 of whom had been massacred Dec. 22, 1997, by paramilitary forces.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE MIGHT not be many jokes in the Bible, but all those fortunate enough to have studied religion at Villanova University under Donald Robert "Dutch" Schultz were assured of plenty of laughs. This jovial professor was one of the most popular teachers at the university, revered for his rich sense of humor and knowledge of his subject. Dutch Schultz died of cancer Feb. 15, at age 84, in Cornville, Ariz., where he and his wife, Juanita Quigley Schultz, had been living since he retired in 1991.
NEWS
February 23, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Israel's Supreme Court has dropped a political hot potato on Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's plate by overturning a law that had effectively exempted tens of thousands of ultra-Orthodox religious students from mandatory military service. The decision could force Netanyahu's conservative coalition government - which includes the leading religious party Shas - to tackle one of the thorniest issues dividing Israel's religious and secular communities. The court ruled that the law must expire by August, and some predict that the debate could become so divisive, it might tear apart Netanyahu's coalition or trigger early elections.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. William A. McGuire, 73, senior vice president for administration at Villanova University from 1998 to 2006 and an administrator there since 1979, died Tuesday, Jan. 17, of cerebral vascular disease at Arden Courts in King of Prussia. Born in Washington, Father McGuire graduated from Archbishop Carroll High School there in 1956 and began his religious studies at the Augustinian Academy in New York City. He earned a bachelor's degree in philosophy at Villanova University in 1962 and, after being ordained in 1965 at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, he earned a master's degree in theological studies at Augustinian College there in 1966.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
Tareque Masud, 54, the first director from Bangladesh to be honored at the Cannes Film Festival, died in a bus accident near Dhaka, Bangladesh, on Aug. 13. Mr. Masud and four others were killed when a minibus collided with a passenger bus, said his wife, Catherine, an American-born producer. His best-known film was The Clay Bird, which won an International Critics' award at Cannes in 2002 for its "authentic, moving and delicate portrayal of a country struggling for its democratic rights.
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