CollectionsRelocation
IN THE NEWS

Relocation

NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Seventh and eighth graders from Carnell School in Northeast Philadelphia will be relocated from an annex to a former Catholic school in January because of structural concerns about the annex's facade, the Philadelphia School District announced Friday. The district said the Department of Licenses and Inspections had asked the district to vacate the annex at 901 Devereaux Ave. in Oxford Circle that houses the Carnell Middle Years Academy by Jan. 30. When seventh and eighth graders return from winter recess Jan. 2, they will attend classes at the former St. Bernard school at 7360 Jackson St. in Holmesburg.
NEWS
February 27, 1997 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
NAACP President Jerome Mondesire waded into the decade-old morass of the sinking Logan homes yesterday and promptly started sinking into a nasty political swamp of his own. Standing at a press conference he had called on a corner of the 35-acre tract at Roosevelt Boulevard and 9th Street, Mondesire slammed city officials for their "foot-dragging" over the relocation of the remaining "100 families" in the sinking homes of Logan Triangle. He pledged to use all political and legal means to get the city moving.
NEWS
July 29, 1993 | By Eddie Olsen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tempers flared as about 100 Woodbury residents packed the Gloucester County Courthouse last night, saying the recent relocation of the county's Adult Probation Department has brought a "criminal element" into their neighborhood. Appearing before a meeting of the Gloucester County Board of Chosen Freeholders, residents and community leaders said they had no warning of the relocation, which took effect about a month ago. The probation department was moved four blocks - from Broad Street, which is a main thoroughfare, to a county-owned brick building on Glover Street near Lincoln Street, in a residential area.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1992 | By William H. Sokolic, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Economic woes in Atlantic City's casino industry could be a way to attract other service industries to Atlantic County. This is one of the findings to come out of a survey of operating costs in 17 metropolitan areas nationwide conducted last fall by the Boyd Co., of Princeton. The survey ranked the Atlantic City area number three in appeal as a relocation site, behind Dallas and Cleveland. "The Atlantic City area shows promise for corporate back offices," said John Boyd, president of the 17-year-old firm, which counsels major corporations on relocation.
NEWS
February 19, 2004 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Delaware River Port Authority yesterday approved the last piece of funding - $950,000 - needed for a $4 million demolition and relocation plan for an environmentally besieged South Camden neighborhood. About 47 families in a four-block area known as the Terraces and on neighboring Arlington Street will be bought out and relocated under the plan. The city hopes to demolish and redevelop the site, which is contaminated by industrial waste, littered by vacant lots and boarded-up homes, and surrounded by truck traffic to the South Jersey Port Corp.
NEWS
April 5, 2004 | By Jennifer Moroz INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The merchants still doing business at the Pennsauken Mart are fairly sure of one thing: Their current home will be razed to make way for Camden County's new civic center. But six months before demolition crews are supposed to come in, just about everything else remains a question mark. The vendors don't know when the county will take over the property and offer the reduced rents they say they need to stay afloat while they look for a new home. When and where the merchants will relocate is still up in the air, as a plan to redevelop a new mart site in Burlington County apparently has stalled.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City housing officials yesterday said the Rendell administration would provide $3 million in federal aid for next fiscal year to relocate families that still live in sinking homes in Logan. John Kromer, director of the city's Office of Housing and Community Development, said the money would be taken from an expected $40 million in federal loans that have been designated for the city Commerce Department. The allocation came after Councilwoman Marian B. Tasco threatened last week to fight the administration's bid for $70.7 million in a Community Development Block Grant to rebuild neighborhoods because none of the money was targeted for Logan.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The eviction notice was in: 48 hours. At a news conference Friday afternoon, Mayor Nutter announced that those camping out on the City Hall apron of Dilworth Plaza as part of Occupy Philadelphia have until 5 p.m. Sunday to pack up their tents and leave. The notice was posted on trees and poles, and handed out to about 300 people in Dilworth Plaza. "This announcement today serves as the promise," Nutter said of those encamped, "you must remove all of your possessions and yourself from that location within the next 48 hours.
NEWS
December 4, 2015
A story Tuesday on legislation to recoup payment of some Department of Veterans Affairs relocation expenses incorrectly identified Sen. Johnny Isakson (R., Ga.) as a House member.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2012 | Diane Mastrull
Hal Jones was a young, long-haired sculptor with a lot of nerve when he showed up with some of his creations at the Philadelphia Museum of Art around 1979. Lucky for him, he did not storm off when the late Anne d'Harnoncourt, the museum's then-director, made more of a fuss over the packaging around his works than the sculptures themselves. Instead, Jones accepted a subcontracting job to build packing crates for the Art Museum. The wisdom of that pride-swallowing decision would be affirmed more than 30 years later when Jones' Philadelphia-based company, Atelier Art Services & Storage, landed what he recently called "the move of maybe the century.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|