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Relocation

BUSINESS
August 27, 1991 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
The Philadelphia area is moving up in popularity as a corporate relocation destination, according to a recent survey of 75 major metropolitan areas in the United States. Philadelphia ranked seventh in the annual listing compiled by PHH Homequity, a Maryland-based relocation management company. It had ranked ninth in the previous year's survey. Washington, D.C., topped the list, with Dallas a close second and Chicago third. Washington was third in the prior year, Dallas first and Chicago fifth.
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | By Frederick Cusick, Inquirer Staff Writer
The city government has stumbled in efforts to buy and shut down the Crystal Bar building at the intersection of Seventh Avenue and Lincoln Highway, Coatesville's best-known drug-dealing corner. City officials budgeted $100,000 last year from Coatesville's federal community development appropriation to buy the building at 707 E. Lincoln Highway. The city, which views the bar as a catalyst of trouble in the area, wanted to close the bar and find another commercial tenant. Last month, however, the Redevelopment Authority of Chester County, which administers the federal funds, informed Coatesville officials that the city's proposal had failed to budget for the expected relocation costs of the eight families that also occupy the building.
NEWS
November 10, 1987 | By GINA BOUBION, Daily News Staff Writer
The neighborhood may be sinking, but it's still home. That's the feeling some 50 Logan residents expressed last night about the city's plan to relocate them because of sinking houses in the area. "The city is forcing us out of our homes," said one impassioned resident, David Hamilton, speaking at a meeting in Holy Trinity Church, Rockland and Marvine streets. "What about human compassion? What about the integrity of the community?" There are 957 houses built on ash and cinder in the 17-block area, bounded by 11th, Loudon and Marshall streets and Roosevelt Boulevard.
NEWS
August 19, 1999 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
When Republican Sam Katz arrived on 11th Street to meet residents of the city's sagging and blighted Logan section, he was quickly greeted by Elizabeth Girod, a forceful, elderly woman. "I'm going to vote for the one that gives me the best deal," Girod said as she grasped Katz's hand. "I don't care if he's Democrat or Republican. " Katz grinned and answered quickly. "When you learn more I think you'll find you've just shaken the hand of the right candidate," he said. There was a discernible whiff of politics in the atmosphere yesterday as Katz quickly accepted the invitation of Democratic Councilwoman and ward leader Marian Tasco to tour Logan as she seeks expanded assistance for owners of sinking homes.
SPORTS
August 25, 2012 | By John Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Are the Sacramento Kings headed east? Inside Business of Norfolk, Va., citing sources who asked not to be identified, reported Thursday that Virginia Beach, Va., officials and the Maloof family, owner of the Kings, are expected to announce on Wednesday that the Kings will move to Virginia Beach. The report did not say when the relocation was to take place. How such a move would affect the NBA is unclear. The Kings play in the Pacific Division, and it's unlikely they would remain there if they moved to Virginia.
NEWS
November 25, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The eviction notice was in: 48 hours. At a news conference Friday afternoon, Mayor Nutter announced that those camping out on the City Hall apron of Dilworth Plaza as part of Occupy Philadelphia have until 5 p.m. Sunday to pack up their tents and leave. The notice was posted on trees and poles, and handed out to about 300 people in Dilworth Plaza. "This announcement today serves as the promise," Nutter said of those encamped, "you must remove all of your possessions and yourself from that location within the next 48 hours.
NEWS
May 18, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
North Hills tenants largely resolved their relocation issues Monday night, but the formidable problem of neighborhood drugs remains a challenge. The North Hills Manor Tenants Association rallied to propose a program to relocate the first eight families of the more than 40 families to be displaced as the Montgomery County Housing Authority undertakes a $1.84 million renovation project in Upper Dublin Township in late June. Association relocation committee President Gloria Wilson read the relocation plan details at a meeting Monday night attended by 34 people - plans appreciatively accepted by Ron Jackson, Housing Authority executive director.
NEWS
October 29, 2002 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
LAST WEEK, I predicted that, with election season approaching, we'd begin to see some action to make up for three years of mayoral dithering. This week, I predict that the mayor will soon announce a new blight czar. Of course, many of us have been calling for someone to fill that post for years (Aug. 31, 2000: "Blight fight needs someone with bite"). It will be interesting to see the mayor and his minions justify this late-season signing. How low down the list of candidates did we have to go to get someone who'd work for this administration?
NEWS
November 16, 2005 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After a half-century in business, the Pennsauken Mart will be open one last Christmas. Merchants would remain through Jan. 31 under a tentative deal with the mart's owner, the Camden County Improvement Authority. The agreement would also reduce their rents to compensate them for the loss of revenue during the months of uncertainty over the mart's closing date. The authority wanted to shut down the mart Oct. 1 but was blocked when the merchants sought a court injunction. The sides have been negotiating for several weeks and are scheduled to appear before state Superior Court Judge Charles W. Dortch Jr. at 1:30 p.m. tomorrow.
NEWS
April 6, 2006 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr. went toe to toe with some of Camden's chief eminent-domain critics yesterday as they questioned whether the city would ever find the money to relocate residents from 2,700 occupied homes expected to be demolished. "There isn't enough money to provide relocation at the level they're talking about across the city," said Rutgers University-Camden professor Howard Gillette, author of a book titled Camden After the Fall. He joined Primas and others at a midday forum at Rutgers-Camden Law School sponsored by the Rutgers-Camden Association for Public Interest Law. Olga Pomar of South Jersey Legal Services, who has represented families facing displacement and has helped block the city's massive eminent-domain projects in the courts, said the national pot of funding for affordable housing was shrinking.
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