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Rembrandt

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FOOD
May 2, 1993 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
Restaurant reviewers worry about being recognized. So when our lunch server at Rembrandt's said, "Don't I know you . . .," I began to cringe - before I realized that she was talking to my review partner, Channel 17 interviewer Dorie Lenz. It was Lenz's first visit to the Art Museum-area restaurant. I'm betting it won't be the last. Her entree, we agreed, was a light, healthful combination in which each ingredient had been given careful attention. The entree's base was angel-hair pasta.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1989 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
Some weeks ago, you read here about the transformation of the Fairmount cafe known as Adrian into one called New Moon. The ownership, name and curtains changed; the food was as good as ever. Meanwhile, Adrian chef Roger Winther took the name and his skills two blocks down Aspen Street to another cozy cafe, one called Rembrandt's. The result is Adrian at Rembrandt, a very likeable restaurant very much like its competition. Not that it's perfect. Adrian at Rembrandt's ought to toss out those stained wine lists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
How fitting that one of the best films ever made about a painter happens to be about one of the best painters who ever put brush to canvas. Rembrandt (1936) stars Charles Laughton in a jolly, somber, exuberant and reflective performance that embraces the brilliance and shadow of the Dutch master's canvases. Focusing on the artist's extravagant talents and spending, the loss of his beloved wife Saskia and also his artistic reputation, the film by Alexander Korda lacks the splendor of his prior collaboration with Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
An exhibit of Rembrandt's paintings of Jesus at the Philadelphia Museum of Art has prompted conversations in Bible study groups, over lunch, and in adult-education classes before Sunday services. The subject is the image of a Christian savior whom Rembrandt depicts in a way that broke with tradition in the mid-17th century. Neither fine-boned nor fair-haired, the Dutch master's pivotal renderings show a Jesus with dark hair and Semitic features, a seeming embrace of his Jewish heritage.
FOOD
February 10, 1991 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Once upon a time it was Rembrandt's. Then the name was changed to Adrian's at Rembrandt's. Recently, with the departure of Adrian's chef, Roger Winther, the only Art Museum area restaurant with a Center City skyline view was back in business as - drum roll, please - Rembrandt's. With the old name came a new chef - David Baxter from Manhattan - and a professional responsibility to see how the place was faring in new hands. Our lunch at the new/old Rembrandt's began on a good note - we found parking almost at the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1991 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
The neighborhood surrounding 23d and Aspen Streets doesn't have hills like Manayunk's, but - surprisingly to me - offers a neat perspective of Center City high-rises. While lights twinkled in the late-evening darkness, we enjoyed the skyline view from the dining-room windows of Rembrandt's. We also savored the pleasant, leisurely dining experience that seems to have become a trademark of this warm and attractive Art Museum-area restaurant. At our Tuesday-night dinner, the lighted message from the Philadelphia Electric Co. building reminded people to vote.
NEWS
May 5, 2002 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
In an art world that sometimes seems to grow more giddy by the hour, an example of another sort is being set by Ursinus' Berman Museum in its show of Rembrandt etchings. As much as any subject, this one reaches out to the public across centuries. The fame of Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-69) is as firmly established as that of Dante and Shakespeare, and his name is a household word. This 27-item traveling show highlights Rembrandt's trailblazing role in launching the growth and advancement of the etching medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
A Rembrandt van Rijn etching exhibit at Drexel University provides a fascinating look at the artist's genius and creative powers. Twenty featured etchings on loan from the W. Ann Reynolds and Thomas H. Kirschbaum collection had been acquired in Europe in the 1970s and '80s. Pride of place here goes to Rembrandt's most famous etching, Christ Preaching, or the "Hundred-Guilder Print" as it has been known from the start, c. 1643-49. The artist's most ambitious work in any medium and one of the most complex with 38 figures, it sums up Christ's mission.
LIVING
January 23, 1995 | By Ellen O'Brien and Marc Kaufman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
"Awe" may be an immeasurable term, and therefore unscientific. But that best describes the response of scientists - archaeologists and anthropologists both - to the cache of prehistoric artistry discovered last month in a limestone cave near Vallon-Pont-d'Arc in southwest France, and announced at a news conference last week in Paris. "The cave is in such a wonderful state of preservation. No one has, essentially, walked on the floor since 20,000 years ago. This is one of those situations where everything is basically the way it was dropped," said Randall White, a professor of anthropology at New York University who specializes in prehistoric art. "If you would find one Rembrandt, you would get excited.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than a decade, James W. Ray was trapped in a fog of drugs and mental illness. In and out of hospitals and emergency rooms, he sometimes landed in halfway houses or jail, one step from the streets. He told anyone who would listen that he was a rich man. That his family once had a 110-room mansion with masterpieces by Rembrandt and Renoir, and ancestral portraits by John Singer Sargent. That his great-granddad owned a racetrack in Miami. Nurses and caseworkers nodded politely while jotting down observations like "delusions of grandeur" and "inflated self-worth" in his records.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 10, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
What can we see in a face? Certainly we see genes, either felicitous or unfortunate. But do we also see the soul, a personality, a life, our selves, imperfections to be fixed or accepted, earning potential? Those are the sorts of questions that occupied a multidisciplinary group of experts - surgeons, psychologists, ethicists, lawyers, even an English professor - last weekend during what was thought to be the first U.S. academic meeting on appearance and identity. The University of Pennsylvania's Center for Human Appearance, which studies how the way we look affects everything else, hosted the two-day event.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2013 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
There are two pivotal moments in Fernando Trueba's lovely, elegiac The Artist and the Model , and they both have to do with the elderly gentleman played by Jean Rochefort, a sculptor and painter by the name of Marc Cros, imparting a bit of wisdom to his new, young Catalan model, Mercé (Aida Folch). In one, she finds a drawing in his studio. It is by Rembrandt, of a child learning to walk. Cros explains that the Dutch master probably knocked it off in a flash, like a snapshot, a captured moment.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
When people think of Philadelphia, they might imagine cheesesteaks and Rocky, the Phillies and the Flyers. They don't necessarily think of our city as an intellectual hub or a center of scientific research, but they should, said Steve Snyder, vice president for exhibit and program development at the Franklin Institute. This region is packed with top-notch universities, illustrious science museums, and booming technology-oriented businesses. Philadelphia is among the top five U.S. cities in National Institutes of Health grants, Snyder said.
NEWS
December 25, 2011 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For more than a decade, James W. Ray was trapped in a fog of drugs and mental illness. In and out of hospitals and emergency rooms, he sometimes landed in halfway houses or jail, one step from the streets. He told anyone who would listen that he was a rich man. That his family once had a 110-room mansion with masterpieces by Rembrandt and Renoir, and ancestral portraits by John Singer Sargent. That his great-granddad owned a racetrack in Miami. Nurses and caseworkers nodded politely while jotting down observations like "delusions of grandeur" and "inflated self-worth" in his records.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
An exhibit of Rembrandt's paintings of Jesus at the Philadelphia Museum of Art has prompted conversations in Bible study groups, over lunch, and in adult-education classes before Sunday services. The subject is the image of a Christian savior whom Rembrandt depicts in a way that broke with tradition in the mid-17th century. Neither fine-boned nor fair-haired, the Dutch master's pivotal renderings show a Jesus with dark hair and Semitic features, a seeming embrace of his Jewish heritage.
NEWS
July 31, 2011 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Culture Writer
On an otherwise unremarkable day about a decade ago, Lloyd DeWitt found himself poking around in the storage vaults of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Recently hired as assistant curator for the John G. Johnson Collection, DeWitt was seeking a deeper familiarity with the breadth of the collection, bequeathed to the museum in 1917. Among the paintings packed away in the darkness was a small head of Christ painted on wood and attributed by a stream of scholars to Rembrandt's workshop, but not to the great 17th-century master himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2010 | By Victoria Donohoe FOR THE INQUIRER
A Rembrandt van Rijn etching exhibit at Drexel University provides a fascinating look at the artist's genius and creative powers. Twenty featured etchings on loan from the W. Ann Reynolds and Thomas H. Kirschbaum collection had been acquired in Europe in the 1970s and '80s. Pride of place here goes to Rembrandt's most famous etching, Christ Preaching, or the "Hundred-Guilder Print" as it has been known from the start, c. 1643-49. The artist's most ambitious work in any medium and one of the most complex with 38 figures, it sums up Christ's mission.
NEWS
September 3, 2007 | By Chris Mondics INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the dawn of a new era of trans-fat-free foods in Philadelphia yesterday, and many diners were none too happy. Some were spitting mad. "This is exactly the sort of issue that the city should not be meddling in, what you put in your mouth," said Jim Reed, 52, a logistics manager, as he sat outside Rembrandt's restaurant in Fairmount, basking in the late-summer sun. "There are other issues that the City Council ought to be involved in...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2007 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A transcendental piece of filmmaking that takes the stoical, observational approach of documentarian Frederick Wiseman and adds a painterly visual aesthetic, Into Great Silence zooms in on a French monastery and the shaven-headed monks who go about their days working, praying and living a life devoted to God. The sprawling stone charter house of the Carthusian Order - founded by St. Bruno of Cologne in 1084 - is situated in a high valley of...
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