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NEWS
May 20, 2002
Tomorrow is Election Day. Plan your day so that you can cast your ballot before the polls close at 8 p.m. If you're a registered Democrat, the Daily News has endorsed Ed Rendell in the primary race for governor. But whoever you choose, we urge you to vote.
NEWS
February 20, 1986
We are in complete agreement with the Rev. Robert Schuller (Page 6-A, Feb. 5), who believes that "The Star-Spangled Banner" should be replaced as the national anthem with "America the Beautiful. " The reference to "bombs bursting in air" and "rockets' red glare" is a painful reminder of the space shuttle explosion. He has written to President Reagan on this issue. We suggest to all those in agreement to do the same. Mr. and Mrs. R. Schaible Philadelphia.
NEWS
May 17, 1997
Is it auto insurance? Or the schools? Or perhaps development and its impact on traffic and the environment? Or jobs? Crime? All of the above? Which issues do you think should most urgently engage the attention of the person elected governor of New Jersey in November? The Editorial Board is interested in what New Jersey voters think about those questions. We're gearing up our continuing experiment in political conversation, Citizen Voices, to focus on these issues this year.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | By Edward Kracz, Special to The Inquirer
If St. James coach Tom Stewart couldn't tell the difference between this year's team and last year's team just by looking at the standings, there is now Friday night's Catholic League Southern Division game with Roman Catholic to consider. The host Cahillites whipped St. James, 125-63, to lower the Bulldogs' league record to a dismal 0-10, 1-19 overall. Last year, when St. James traveled to Roman Catholic, it emerged with a a 21-point victory. "We had some big bodies that could go underneath and knock some heads," Stewart said.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | By Gina Esposito, Special to The Inquirer
Rutledge Borough Council members are asking residents to maintain their properties and to eliminate health hazards in the borough. Some homeowners in the borough are neglecting routine property maintenance such as trimming tree limbs and hedges, borough council member Diane McGaughey said at a caucus meeting Tuesday. "I go walking and I have to duck tree limbs," McGaughey said. "They're supposed to be nine feet (from the ground) but a lot of them aren't. " Other borough officials agreed that the protruding plants were becoming a hazard.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012
DEAR ABBY: Several years ago you printed a poem about forgiveness in your column. I clipped the column and saved it, but over time I seem to have lost it. Could you please run this piece again? - Daniela in Toronto DEAR DANIELA: I'm glad to oblige. The poem you have requested, "Decide to Forgive," was written by the late Robert Muller, former assistant secretary-general of the United Nations. Now, with so much turmoil going on in the nation and in the world, its sentiments are particularly relevant: DECIDE TO FORGIVE Decide to forgive For resentment is negative Resentment is poisonous Resentment diminishes and devours the self.
NEWS
May 18, 2016
ISSUE | HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL A reminder to stop all genocide As a Jewish American, I was heartened to learn of the plans for a Holocaust Memorial Park, including the 1964 sculpture at 16th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway ("Never, ever forgotten," Thursday). To me, the three famous questions of the renowned Jewish thinker Hillel are germane: 1. If I am not for myself, who will be for me? The proposed memorial, and many similar efforts nationwide, should serve as a living reminder that never again should Jews be threatened or killed, or allow ourselves to be. 2. But if I am only for myself, who am I?
NEWS
November 5, 2010
This year my son, Will, was hired for his first full-time job. When he came home with his first paycheck, he noticed the taxes that were taken out of the small sum. I made a derogatory comment about paying taxes and how frustrating it is to see hard-earned dollars go into the pit where the tax man resides. Americans are taught early on that paying taxes and taxes in general are horrible and we should do everything to avoid them, including finding loopholes that would save us from relinquishing our cash to the boogeyman.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | By GARRY MADDOX
Having spent a year in Vietnam, I might seem like the last person to need the Philadelphia Vietnam Veterans Memorial to remind me of those who gave their lives, a reminder for future generations. I am embarrassed to say I do. On the flight I took from Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam, to Fort Lewis, Wash., I did not know one person, nor did I speak to anyone. I was happy to be going home, but the main thing on my mind was putting the past year behind me, as far out of my mind as possible.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 27, 2016
IN A speech Monday night before the Democratic National Convention, Mayor Kenney offered delegates a brief history lesson about Philadelphia. Not about the good part - the cradle of liberty, home to the Declaration of Independence, the modern birthplace of democracy, etc. He talked about the bad part, the Philadelphia of the 1840s when it was the center of anti-immigrant sentiment in the United States. Citizens were up in arms - literally up in arms - about the arrival of foreign trash on American soil.
NEWS
July 11, 2016
The metamorphosis of the peaceful civil rights movement led by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. into the fiery "black power" revolution promoted by Stokely Carmichael and Huey P. Newton didn't just happen. Violence grew out of frustration with this nation's inadequate attention to intolerable conditions that continued to plague African American communities. Given Thursday night's damnable assassination of five Dallas police officers in apparent retaliation for the fatal shootings of two black men by police in Baton Rouge., La., and St. Paul, Minn., one must hope this nation won't repeat history.
NEWS
June 25, 2016
By Paula Marantz Cohen As a professor of literature, I have noted a trend that helps explain the decline of the humanities as an object of reverence in this country: Students are less prone to read for pleasure than they used to be. Blame the packed nature of their course schedules and the many activities that compete for their attention. Universities still teach literature, but these courses tend to serve an instrumental purpose. Students read in these courses to acquire certain skills or apply certain critical techniques.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
HERE ARE SOME of the things you are not supposed to compare abortion to: Slavery. That's because slaves were human, and, even though the law treated them as property, the truth of their separate and sacred identity was obvious to the naked and uncompromised eye. The Holocaust. That's because Hitler's victims were human, with infinite gifts that elevated civilization, even though the laws - both expressed and implicit - treated them as lesser beings. Their humanity was evident.
NEWS
June 23, 2016
By Jacquelyn Warr-Williams In the aftermath of the Orlando killings, there has been a tremendous outpouring of love and support for the victims and their families. But this tragedy has also brought to the surface the unbelievable hate that still exists for gay and transgender individuals. This hate is not anonymous, and it is not confined to one group of people. A California pastor openly commented that he was not going to mourn those who died in Orlando. He stated, "Are you sad that 50 sodomites were killed today?
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
For many LGBT people of my generation, the dance floor was the place we realized we were far from alone and in fact belonged to a tribe. That sort of awakening is unlike any other, and I bet the young men and women dancing at Pulse in Orlando last weekend knew that feeling too. What they felt as their place of sanctuary and celebration became a killing field I prefer not to imagine. I'd rather look at their faces in the photos. The youthfulness is heartbreaking, but the exuberant, unabashed gay fabulousness makes me smile.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
At Cecil B. Moore Recreation Center, they lovingly call LeShadae Godfrey the " Lion King Lady. " For six months, Godfrey, who runs the crumbling North Philadelphia rec center's theater arts programming on a bare-bones budget, has been raising money to take a dozen kids to see the Broadway musical in New York City this month. Godfrey needed to raise $5,000. Cecil B. Moore, like all city rec centers, gets no money from the city for arts programming, besides budgeting for staffing and necessities.
NEWS
June 4, 2016 | By Emma Platoff, Staff Writer
As the 10-year anniversary of a primary election day murder in Gloucester County approaches, investigators have put out a yearly call for information to help solve the homicide. Detectives continue to seek leads in the June 6, 2006, slaying of Desiree McGraw, a 27-year-old mother of two who was found dead from one gunshot to the head behind a polling place on Mail Avenue in Deptford Township. A reward for information that leads to an arrest and conviction - posted at $5,000 at the time of McGraw's death and raised to $8,000 four years later - still stands.
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
TWENTY-NINE years ago this week, I graduated from law school. It's been almost three decades since I've been able to officially call myself an "officer of the court," a title I wear with a great deal of pride and an even greater amount of embarrassment. I've always been a little ashamed of using that moniker because, in a vague way, it implies valor on my part that I don't possess. The word "officer" makes me think of someone in a uniform, either on an urban or foreign battlefield, defending fellow citizens against imminent danger.
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