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Remote Control

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NEWS
May 19, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Never mind the backlash, that instrument widely used for whipping women back into their place. Forget about the double shift, the glass ceiling and the mommy track. We here at the Institute for Happily Ever After Living (HEAL) have finally identified the most reactionary implement currently used to undermine equality in modern marriage. This is the small innocent-looking rectangle known as a television remote control. The clicker. HEALers have spent long months researching this subject.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia Electric Co. has begun a five-year, $60-million program to install 200,000 new meters that can be read by remote control. Charles C. Rogala, PE's manager of customer service and accounts, said yesterday that the meters were being put in residential and business locations where meter readers have difficulty obtaining access. The program will save money and help PE comply with a Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission requirement that meters be read every six months, Rogala said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1992 | By Andy Wickstrom, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
What separates the committed videomaker from the hopeless amateur? It's not the cost of the camcorder or the size of the lens. It's the willingness to edit all that raw footage into something worth watching, to select the few moments of genuine interest from the boring bulk of what you have shot. The reason more camcorder users don't spend the time required to edit their footage is that it's mostly a tedious job. After connecting the camcorder "master" to the VCR "slave" (duplicator jargon for the playback unit and the recording unit)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1989 | By Andy Wickstrom, Special to The Inquirer
Problem: You consider video hardware an eyesore in your living room, so you've hidden the VCR and other components inside a stylish cabinet with solid doors. But when you want to view a tape, you have to leave the door ajar in order to use the infrared remote controller. Problem: You'd like a built-in designer look for the new TV, perhaps inside a close-fitting box that allows only the screen area to show. But won't that cover up the remote sensor on the bottom edge of the set?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1992 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Doing away with remote-control clutter is a worthy goal. Some of the most prominent names in consumer electronics, including Philips, RCA and Sony, have marketed multipurpose remotes that handle the four or five most common components in any media room, regardless of brand. The "learning" remotes are the most sophisticated. You use your old remote to "teach" the appropriate infrared codes to the new model, button by button. It's tedious, but in the end you have a single remote that can control as many as eight gadgets.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | By Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau
When Paul Cherubini gets home to his apartment in Arlington, Va., he turns on the TV and - tapping the remote control - flips restlessly from channel to channel to channel. "Right now there's a ton of basketball games on," said Cherubini, 23, who is a student and a waiter. "I watch one until the commercial, then change to a different one. I can follow four games at once that way. I drive my wife crazy. " Cherubini is a "zapper" - one of the growing millions of fickle television viewers who flit from station to station, fleeing commercials, tracking multiple shows, forever searching for something more interesting or exciting.
NEWS
October 7, 1993 | By LARRY PLATT
A couple of Sundays ago, my sister Andee came over to watch the Eagles game. Without thinking, at the first timeout, I grabbed the remote control - which is never out of reach - and started scanning channels at a dizzying pace; the Phillies, after all, were also on, so I figured I had just enough time to catch a couple of Tommy Greene breaking pitches and check out a scene from the action thriller on PRISM before returning to the Birds - precisely...
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | By Anne deForest, Special to The Inquirer
Remote control means power. You know the feeling: lying back on your couch with that sleek black instrument in your hand, ready to zap Johnny Carson in mid-monologue. The man makes millions of dollars a year, and you, lying passively in your living room, have the power to send him into oblivion. Not that everybody needs to act out his Terminator fantasies. Ask most people why they like remote control, and they'll cite "convenience. " "You don't have to get out of your chair," says stereo and television salesman Jeff Browndorf.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Weeks later, I'm still recovering from my visit with my mother. She's Earthquake Mary. And I'm having aftershocks. Do you remember I wrote about how love and worry bind Mother Mary and me, in that she and I always worried about Francesca, when she was a baby? Well, times have changed, and now Francesca and I are worried about Mother Mary. Why? No reason, aside from the fact that she's 89 and alone all day, while my brother is at work. Francesca and I worry that she could fall, or choke on food, or any number of things that Mother Mary and I used to worry about with baby Francesca.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1993 | By Andy Wickstrom, FOR THE INQUIRER
Audio and video equipment designers put a lot of effort into making their various products pleasing to the eye. But there's a certain segment of the population - OK, usually the women - who simply don't find rows of buttons and lights very attractive. Oddly enough, they don't want a corner of their living room to resemble a jet pilot's control panel. One traditional solution is to hide the offending components - audio receivers, VCRs, tape decks, CD players and so on - inside cabinetry.
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BUSINESS
May 24, 2013 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Jaded by juggling multiple remotes? Confounded by the connections linking your TV to your cable box to your DVD and other devices in your television room? Ignorant of how to switch inputs - or even which control to use? You know who you are, and some of you have spent time at my house. Microsoft, the long-dominant software-maker lately eclipsed by Apple's smartphones and tablets, says it has an answer: a central command station for your television, gaming, music, Internet video, even Skype video calls - all controlled by your voice and gestures.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Weeks later, I'm still recovering from my visit with my mother. She's Earthquake Mary. And I'm having aftershocks. Do you remember I wrote about how love and worry bind Mother Mary and me, in that she and I always worried about Francesca, when she was a baby? Well, times have changed, and now Francesca and I are worried about Mother Mary. Why? No reason, aside from the fact that she's 89 and alone all day, while my brother is at work. Francesca and I worry that she could fall, or choke on food, or any number of things that Mother Mary and I used to worry about with baby Francesca.
NEWS
February 8, 2013
SOME FACTS about America's drone warfare: *  The U.S. military now has 8,000 drones (military designation: UAV, for unmanned aerial vehicle) with plans to add more. There are several types: The MQ-1B Predator is 27 feet long with a wingspan of 55 feet and the ability to fire two Hellfire missiles. *  Most drones are operated remotely from military sites in Nevada, Texas and elsewhere, plus a site near the CIA headquarters, in Virginia. The drones themselves take off from bases in southern Afghanistan, Djibouti, and - it was just revealed this week - Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
April 9, 2011 | Associated Press
ATLANTA - A massive Russian cargo plane roared into Atlanta yesterday to pick up one of the world's largest concrete pumps, which has been retrofitted to pour water on a Japanese nuclear power plant stricken by an earthquake and tsunami. The 190,000-pound pump designed by Wisconsin-based Putzmeister America Inc. comes mounted on a 26-wheel truck. Its extendable boom can reach more than 200 feet, and can be operated two miles away by remote control, making it possible to shoot water into hard-to-reach places at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2011
BAR KARMA. 10 p.m. Friday, Current TV. NEWARK, N.J. - It's an old, old story: Guy walks into a bar and . . . What comes next? If the bar is "Bar Karma," the time-travel show Current TV is billing as "the world's first community-developed television series," it might be up to you. Because the show that premieres Friday night and whose third episode was being filmed here last week on a Delancy Street soundstage is an attempt to bring viewers...
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
VINCENT A. Carr Sr. was a champion mixologist with a devoted clientele at the many bars where he practiced his trade, and it was obvious that one of the factors that made him great was that he loved people. Vince - an Irish-born American with a gift for blarney, who also was an entrepreneur, a jitterbug dancer who always drew a crowd, expert dart shooter, carpenter and skilled fisherman - died Sunday after a long battle with prostate cancer. He was 75 and lived in Fairmount. He was born in County Donegal, Ireland, to Thomas Carr and Bridget Doherty, and came to the U.S. in 1939.
NEWS
January 7, 2011 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Staff Writer
WASHINGTON - In his first full day on the job, he got lost in the byzantine basement of the Capitol with his parents, his daughter, and a few friends. He also cast a vote fulfilling a campaign promise to reduce federal spending - specifically, cutting 5 percent of funds allotted for congressional office expenses. And he attended to tasks as mundane as choosing a company to print his business cards. But one thing new U.S. Rep. Jon Runyan (R., N.J.) didn't do Thursday was read from the Constitution.
SPORTS
October 6, 2010
Fans around the Delaware Valley will have a busy Sunday night with their remote control. Major League Baseball announced that Game 3 of the Reds-Phillies series in Cincinnati will start at either 7:07 p.m. or 8:07 p.m. It moves to the later start if the Yankees-Twins series finishes in three games, meaning the Phillies-Reds would be the only prime-time game. Of course, the only prime-time NFL game Sunday is the Eagles visiting San Francisco with an 8:20 kickoff. Philadelphia sports fans were faced with the same situation in 2008 when a Phillies division series game against Milwaukee started at the same time as an Eagles-Redskins game.
NEWS
July 3, 2010
What does Jamie Moyer have to do to get some respect at the Citizens Bank Park concession stands? It seems you can't enter the ballpark without sporting a Phillies shirt. But there are no shirts for sale at the ballpark emblazoned with Moyer's name and number, 50. How can that be? Moyer's a local guy from Sellersville who graduated from St. Joseph's University. He has been in the major leagues since before some of today's players were born. He's the hero for every middle-aged diehard fan with a remote control in one hand and a Bud in the other.
NEWS
June 24, 2010 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Decades ago, when most of Philadelphia's largest companies had their headquarters here, the region's highest-paid executives were also neighbors, working on area boards and coaching their children's sports teams, as Comcast chief executive Brian Roberts once did in Chestnut Hill. These days, major companies have big operations here, but their headquarters and chief executives often are elsewhere, from Connecticut to Denver. For the most part, their personal involvement in the region is minor, especially when it comes to discussing their compensation.
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