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Renaissance

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 17, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jacob R. Getson, 60, of North Wales, whose career took him from work with street gangs to the executive suite of a health insurance provider, died Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital after a year-long battle with kidney cancer. "Jake was one of the few Renaissance men I've ever met," said Rabbi Gregory Marx of Getson's synagogue, Congregation Beth Or in Spring House. "He was a spiritual man. He had tremendous social convictions in terms of fighting poverty and racism," Rabbi Marx said.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN As contractors laid groundwork outside for the state's first "Renaissance" school, Gov. Christie and South Jersey political figures gathered inside - at the neighboring Cooper Medical School of Rowan University - to raise silver shovels to ceremonially launch the work. KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy is slated to be the first of the hybrid district/charter schools established under the Urban Hope Act. It will open in a temporary facility in the fall of 2014 with 100 kindergarten students, who will then move to the permanent 110,000-square-foot facility for elementary and middle school students in the fall of 2015, organizers say. "This stuff isn't easy to do," Christie said of turning around the city's struggling public school district, "but nor should it be easy for us to continue to ignore these children.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The tradition of wind instrumentalists livening the courts of Europe was a mark of the Renaissance. It produced a vast repertoire of music, colorful composers and even competition among princes for the services of the virtuoso players. The Renaissance Wind Band devoted its opening concert to exploring that tradition. In its program Saturday at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, the ensemble presented works categorized by the Italian cities that spawned them. To help bridge players and listeners, ensemble members read contemporary letters and writings that showed how the wind players were regarded in their time.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
West Philadelphia High School will not become a Renaissance school in the fall after school district officials learned last week that a group associated with a potential provider paid some parents $500 each, a district source said. A source with knowledge of the situation said officials became skeptical of Johns Hopkins University/Diploma NOW when officials received reports that a group associated with it that would have provided support services in the school, dished out the dough to four parents on West's school advisory council for outreach.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AS HEAD of the School Advisory Council at Steel Elementary, Kendra Brooks should be one of the first people to learn about major potential changes at the school, which two of her children attend. Apparently, that doesn't apply when a charter operator is poised to take it over. Brooks, co-founder of a community organization in Nicetown, said she was blindsided Friday when another parent told her that Mastery Charter Schools had been chosen to turn around Steel - three days before it was announced by the School District of Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 19, 1987
James J. Kilpatrick (Op-ed Page, March 13) should not have accepted U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand's findings about "secular humanism" upon which the judgment was made, in separating church from state, that "this religion denies the transcendent and the supernatural, therefore God. " Fundamentalists and extremist Catholics rightly deserve correction, since their ideas are retrogressive remnants of the darker aspects of medievalism. Without secular humanism as it is understood in its true sense, there would have never existed the Renaissance, its poets, such as Dante and Petrarch, its artists, such as Michelangelo, Leonardo, Brunelleschi, Giotto, the whole spirit of Platonism that gave us Roger Bacon, Copernicus, Galileo, etc. Without secular humanism neither would there have existed the romantic geniuses of literature, art and music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Alex Lauterstein, a former architecture student, knows how to build. And the Uruguay native has taken to the turntables to engineer remixes. His edginess has won over clubgoers at New York's Roxy, Limelight, and Twilo Night Club - not to mention impressing Peter Rauhofer enough to garner a collaboration with the Grammy winner. He was also named "Best DJ" by Philadelphia magazine. In a marathon jam beginning at 11 p.m. Saturday and continuing until noon Sunday, Lauterstein will present his techno sound at Transit for the premiere of "Renaissance," a party that will also include Peter Bailey, Lee Jones, Dozia, Johnny Amsterdam and Gregg Foreman on the turntables To get away from the overplayed anthems of Benjamins and Cristal, head to the Grape Street Pub on Wednesday for "Thaphilliblaze," some non-formula hip-hop.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years Ron sat alone in his room, all cross-dressed up and no place to go. Through his growing-up years near Chicago, through the near-misses of his frat-boy days in college, through the telling of the secret to his high school sweetheart and the trauma that ensued, Ron dressed in private, far away from everyone. No more. Not since the Renaissance. Once a month, he meets in a pastel-shaded suite in the heart of a King of Prussia office park with others like himself: men (and sometimes a few women)
NEWS
March 29, 1988 | BY JAMES E. TAGUE
That area along the Delaware River, anchored on the north by Philadelphia International Airport and Tinicum Township, and on the south by Chester and Marcus Hook, is on the verge of a major renaissance. This 14.6-mile riverfront corridor in eastern Delaware County consists of old abandoned plants and buildings, an underdeveloped waterfront, a series of one-industry-type towns and an extensive but outdated network of rail and highway facilities. A pervading sense of despair, long entrenched by the lack of any real progress toward returning to its past position of industrial strength, has mesmerized the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2006 | By BOB STRAUSS Los Angeles Daily News
Watching "Renaissance," you get very excited whenever a little shade of gray appears. Sounds kind of pathetic, doesn't it? This French animated thriller is presented in high-contrast, digitized black and white that is quite striking, actually, packed with richly delineated details and amazing lighting schemes. But artistic as it undeniably is, the two-tone effect grows tedious fast. And since it's coupled with a mystery story that's humdrum from the start, boredom multiplies.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
A statewide grassroots education group, frequently and oftentimes fiercely critical of the state's charter school laws, is questioning whether Camden's process of bringing two more Renaissance schools to the city violated state statute. On Monday, Save Our Schools, founded in 2010, sent a letter to Commissioner David C. Hespe at the Department of Education raising concerns over promotional materials sent home with students last week detailing Mastery and Uncommon Schools. The letter to the commissioner also took issue with the district's application of the Urban Hope Act, which created district-hybrid schools.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
AS HEAD of the School Advisory Council at Steel Elementary, Kendra Brooks should be one of the first people to learn about major potential changes at the school, which two of her children attend. Apparently, that doesn't apply when a charter operator is poised to take it over. Brooks, co-founder of a community organization in Nicetown, said she was blindsided Friday when another parent told her that Mastery Charter Schools had been chosen to turn around Steel - three days before it was announced by the School District of Philadelphia.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
TO BE a charter school or not to be: That is the question facing parents in two North Philadelphia neighborhoods during the next month. As part of an ongoing effort to turn around its lowest-performing schools, the School District of Philadelphia yesterday recommended placing Edward T. Steel Elementary and Luis Munoz-Marin Elementary into the hands of Mastery Charter Schools and ASPIRA of Pennsylvania, respectively. As part of the process this year, parents will vote on whether the schools become Renaissance charters or remain district-run.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE PHILADELPHIA School District yesterday announced major changes to its Renaissance Initiative aimed at turning around chronically low-performing schools by converting them to charters. As part of the new process, district officials will match charter operators with a school, school communities will have the option to become Renaissance charters or remain district-run schools, and the vote will be open to all parents at the selected schools. Two schools, which have yet to be identified, are expected to be converted in September.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN As contractors laid groundwork outside for the state's first "Renaissance" school, Gov. Christie and South Jersey political figures gathered inside - at the neighboring Cooper Medical School of Rowan University - to raise silver shovels to ceremonially launch the work. KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy is slated to be the first of the hybrid district/charter schools established under the Urban Hope Act. It will open in a temporary facility in the fall of 2014 with 100 kindergarten students, who will then move to the permanent 110,000-square-foot facility for elementary and middle school students in the fall of 2015, organizers say. "This stuff isn't easy to do," Christie said of turning around the city's struggling public school district, "but nor should it be easy for us to continue to ignore these children.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two charter school operators, including one with an extensive network in Philadelphia, moved closer Thursday to being allowed to open charter-like "Renaissance" schools in Camden. "We are excited to bring to the community potential new opportunities for students through these partnership schools," state-appointed Camden School Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard said in announcing that the applications of Mastery Charter Schools and Uncommon Schools would move toward further consideration.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE SCHOOL District of Philadelphia's latest attempt to turn around "underperforming" schools has yielded dramatic improvements in some cases, while many schools are still struggling, according to a recent report by the district. The Renaissance Schools Initiative, launched in 2010 by former superintendent Arlene Ackerman, paired schools with either charter operators or district-run turnaround teams. Thirty-five schools have undergone the transformation, including three that since have closed.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
FOR EIGHTH-grader Germaine Fitchett, the difference between Grover Cleveland Mastery Charter pre- and post-Renaissance is like night and day. "The school got more strict. We have more responsibilities and higher requirements and things like that," the wiry teen said during a recent tour of the school, on 19th Street near Erie Avenue. But he doesn't mean that in a bad way. "The teachers, they're always happy and excited and things like that. And especially around PSSA time," he explained, referring to the state achievement exams.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
With Paul Markland at the wheel, one can expect highway conditions to be dry and wry. The cartoonist, musician, and part-time school bus driver - who produced a collection about the Schuylkill Expressway 20 years ago - is on that renowned road again with a fresh trio of volumes from Tate Publishing. Markland's new Buckle Up series stars Off-the-Wall Paul, his green-hatted alter ego, in a variety of vehicular vignettes jammed with clueless drivers, fearless truckers, and apocalyptic traffic backups.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN With one Renaissance school slated to open in the fall of 2014, the Camden School District this week announced that it was seeking proposals for more of the charter-like, privately managed public schools. The district, which was taken over by the state last summer, can approve up to three more Renaissance schools, after the city school board gave the go-ahead to KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy in November 2012. "What we care about most is ensuring every student and their family has access to an excellent school," superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard said, "and Renaissance schools present one opportunity to make that assessment and to see what interest is out there to attract talent to create high-quality schools.
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