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Renaissance

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NEWS
November 17, 1999 | By Mary Blakinger, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jacob R. Getson, 60, of North Wales, whose career took him from work with street gangs to the executive suite of a health insurance provider, died Sunday at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital after a year-long battle with kidney cancer. "Jake was one of the few Renaissance men I've ever met," said Rabbi Gregory Marx of Getson's synagogue, Congregation Beth Or in Spring House. "He was a spiritual man. He had tremendous social convictions in terms of fighting poverty and racism," Rabbi Marx said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1993 | By Daniel Webster, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The tradition of wind instrumentalists livening the courts of Europe was a mark of the Renaissance. It produced a vast repertoire of music, colorful composers and even competition among princes for the services of the virtuoso players. The Renaissance Wind Band devoted its opening concert to exploring that tradition. In its program Saturday at Bryn Mawr Presbyterian Church, the ensemble presented works categorized by the Italian cities that spawned them. To help bridge players and listeners, ensemble members read contemporary letters and writings that showed how the wind players were regarded in their time.
NEWS
June 3, 2010 | By DAFNEY TALES, talesd@phillynews.com 215-854-5084
West Philadelphia High School will not become a Renaissance school in the fall after school district officials learned last week that a group associated with a potential provider paid some parents $500 each, a district source said. A source with knowledge of the situation said officials became skeptical of Johns Hopkins University/Diploma NOW when officials received reports that a group associated with it that would have provided support services in the school, dished out the dough to four parents on West's school advisory council for outreach.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Camden School District will convert five schools into "Renaissance" schools, district officials announced Wednesday, a plan that will involve the closing of one building but that they said will preserve the others as neighborhood institutions. In three of the five schools, the Renaissance provider will serve all grades in their current buildings, and four buildings will undergo significant renovations, some as soon as this year. Students at all five schools will not be split up unless they choose to attend other district schools, officials said.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
The operators of Camden's "Renaissance" charter schools said Monday that they had formed community benefit agreements to provide health screenings, adult education classes, legal seminars, and other services to city residents. The agreements also call for the nonprofit school operators Mastery, Uncommon, and KIPP to give preference to local residents in hiring and contracts, which city and school officials said would strengthen relationships between the schools and their neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 19, 1987
James J. Kilpatrick (Op-ed Page, March 13) should not have accepted U.S. District Judge W. Brevard Hand's findings about "secular humanism" upon which the judgment was made, in separating church from state, that "this religion denies the transcendent and the supernatural, therefore God. " Fundamentalists and extremist Catholics rightly deserve correction, since their ideas are retrogressive remnants of the darker aspects of medievalism. Without secular humanism as it is understood in its true sense, there would have never existed the Renaissance, its poets, such as Dante and Petrarch, its artists, such as Michelangelo, Leonardo, Brunelleschi, Giotto, the whole spirit of Platonism that gave us Roger Bacon, Copernicus, Galileo, etc. Without secular humanism neither would there have existed the romantic geniuses of literature, art and music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2001 | By Lloylita Prout FOR THE INQUIRER
Alex Lauterstein, a former architecture student, knows how to build. And the Uruguay native has taken to the turntables to engineer remixes. His edginess has won over clubgoers at New York's Roxy, Limelight, and Twilo Night Club - not to mention impressing Peter Rauhofer enough to garner a collaboration with the Grammy winner. He was also named "Best DJ" by Philadelphia magazine. In a marathon jam beginning at 11 p.m. Saturday and continuing until noon Sunday, Lauterstein will present his techno sound at Transit for the premiere of "Renaissance," a party that will also include Peter Bailey, Lee Jones, Dozia, Johnny Amsterdam and Gregg Foreman on the turntables To get away from the overplayed anthems of Benjamins and Cristal, head to the Grape Street Pub on Wednesday for "Thaphilliblaze," some non-formula hip-hop.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, Inquirer Staff Writer
For years Ron sat alone in his room, all cross-dressed up and no place to go. Through his growing-up years near Chicago, through the near-misses of his frat-boy days in college, through the telling of the secret to his high school sweetheart and the trauma that ensued, Ron dressed in private, far away from everyone. No more. Not since the Renaissance. Once a month, he meets in a pastel-shaded suite in the heart of a King of Prussia office park with others like himself: men (and sometimes a few women)
NEWS
March 29, 1988 | BY JAMES E. TAGUE
That area along the Delaware River, anchored on the north by Philadelphia International Airport and Tinicum Township, and on the south by Chester and Marcus Hook, is on the verge of a major renaissance. This 14.6-mile riverfront corridor in eastern Delaware County consists of old abandoned plants and buildings, an underdeveloped waterfront, a series of one-industry-type towns and an extensive but outdated network of rail and highway facilities. A pervading sense of despair, long entrenched by the lack of any real progress toward returning to its past position of industrial strength, has mesmerized the area.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
CAMDEN As contractors laid groundwork outside for the state's first "Renaissance" school, Gov. Christie and South Jersey political figures gathered inside - at the neighboring Cooper Medical School of Rowan University - to raise silver shovels to ceremonially launch the work. KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy is slated to be the first of the hybrid district/charter schools established under the Urban Hope Act. It will open in a temporary facility in the fall of 2014 with 100 kindergarten students, who will then move to the permanent 110,000-square-foot facility for elementary and middle school students in the fall of 2015, organizers say. "This stuff isn't easy to do," Christie said of turning around the city's struggling public school district, "but nor should it be easy for us to continue to ignore these children.
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FOOD
June 10, 2016
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of June 8, 2016: Craig LaBan: We're talking beer - Philly Beer Week, the Inquirer's big Brew-vitational ( published last week ), and the swift and sudsy rise of great brewing in South Jersey. We have a couple of guests to answer questions: Mike "Scoats" Scotese, longtime Philly Beer Week board member and draft master of Northeast Philly as co-owner of Grey Lodge Pub, Hop Angel Brauhaus, and the SawTown Tavern; also Drew Perry, the GM and head brewer of Double Nickel Brewing Co. in Pennsauken, one of the winners from the rising Jersey contingent at this year's Brewvi competition for local beer.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Mensah M. Dean, Staff Writer
The School Reform Commission moved forward Thursday night with plans to turn over three struggling elementary schools to charter operators as part of the Renaissance reform program, but postponed taking action on seven existing charter schools that were seeking renewal agreements. The decisions came at the end of a five-hour meeting during which audience members at times shouted out their frustrations and suffered having their microphone cutoff when they spoke too long. The district's five-year-old Renaissance Schools initiative, which aims to transform academically struggling schools by turning them over to charter operators, was front and center at the meeting.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
City Councilwoman Helen Gym said Tuesday that a New York-based charter chain lacks the qualifications to turn around Cooke Elementary School and that its proposed administrative costs are so high that the school would have 50 percent less to spend on classroom instruction. Gym, who analyzed the proposal of Great Oaks Foundation Inc., said that its budget at Cooke calls for spending four times the amount on administration as the Logan school pays now, and includes a $550,000 management fee to the foundation.
NEWS
February 25, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
The century-old building that housed Camden's J.G. Whittier Family School, which was closed last year after falling into a dangerous state of disrepair, will reopen this year as a new KIPP school, Camden City School District officials said Tuesday. KIPP, the nonprofit that operates the KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy in nearby Lanning Square, where Tuesday night's school board meeting was held, will invest in major renovations and open it as a charter-public hybrid "Renaissance" school, said Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard.
NEWS
February 10, 2016 | By Allison Steele, Staff Writer
The operators of Camden's "Renaissance" charter schools said Monday that they had formed community benefit agreements to provide health screenings, adult education classes, legal seminars, and other services to city residents. The agreements also call for the nonprofit school operators Mastery, Uncommon, and KIPP to give preference to local residents in hiring and contracts, which city and school officials said would strengthen relationships between the schools and their neighborhoods.
NEWS
January 13, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
The fate of two Philadelphia public schools seems sealed: Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. Monday recommended that Cooke Elementary in Logan and Huey Elementary in West Philadelphia be given to charter companies to run. But, in a surprise move, a third elementary Hite had recommended for charter conversion will remain a traditional Philadelphia School District school. Wister Elementary staved off becoming a charter - thanks not so much to the outcry of the community, Hite said, but to new data that showed signs of growth for the Germantown school.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
An ambitious plan to develop 675 acres along the Delaware River in Bensalem Township, 20 years in the making, has taken several steps moving it closer to reality. The Bensalem Township Council passed eight ordinances Monday night, including one creating a Department of Economic Development, aimed at launching what township officials are calling the "River Renaissance in New Bensalem. " "After all these years and all the studies, we finally came up with a real plan," Mayor Joseph DiGirolamo said Tuesday.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden school officials announced plans Tuesday for Mastery Charter Schools to open a new high school in North Camden. Mastery intends to operate a charter-public hybrid "Renaissance" school out of the former Pyne Poynt Middle School building, which currently houses students attending Mastery's North Camden Elementary School. Those students will eventually move into a new facility that Mastery is constructing in Cramer Hill. North Camden has never had a high school, and public school students in the area traditionally attend Woodrow Wilson in East Camden, about two miles away.
NEWS
September 24, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inside an auditorium at Camden County College's downtown campus Tuesday morning, charter school advocates, state educators, and politicians discussed the future of the city's public schools. One presenter with the New Jersey School Choice and Education Reform Alliance, the North Jersey group hosting the event, said that within a few years, the district's expanding network of charter and public-charter hybrid "Renaissance" schools could serve all the city's students, essentially abolishing Camden's traditional public schools.
SPORTS
May 28, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
NEW YORK - Aaron Harang's long and winding career made a pit stop in Flushing in September 2013. The 6-foot-7 righthander spent that season's final few weeks starting for the New York Mets. The next month he was granted free agency. Considering the 362 starts and 1,780 strikeouts on his resumé, 23 innings of a third-place season in New York should serve as little more than a footnote to Harang's established major-league career. But even now, with the 37-year-old off to an incredible start to the season for the Phillies, he can thank the Mets - one coach in particular - for assisting his career renaissance.
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