CollectionsRendell
IN THE NEWS

Rendell

NEWS
October 28, 2004 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
STEVE Schramm told me he's worried about his son Matthew, a soldier stationed in Kuwait. He's concerned about more than his safety. The way things stand, Matthew, a 25-year-old Army reservist who puts his life on the line every day for his country, will not get to vote for commander-in-chief. He still hasn't received his absentee ballot, despite making the request during the summer! Incredible. And those who are quick to scream "disenfranchisement" when felons in Florida are rightfully prevented from voting have been slow to support the same rights for soldiers.
NEWS
January 17, 1986 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Up to now, former District Attorney Edward G. Rendell has run softly for governor, albeit with a big schtick. He was saying things like, "As you know, I will soon complete my second term as district attorney. At that time, I plan to announce my candidacy for governor of Pennsylvania. " Next week, at no specific stroke of the clock, the Committee to Elect Ed Rendell will become Rendell for Governor - and Rendell will really, truly, finally be on the road to the Democratic primary.
NEWS
August 28, 1986 | By MARIA GALLAGHER, Daily News Staff Writer
Former District Attorney Edward G. Rendell is protesting less and less strenuously when asked if he'll be a candidate for mayor in the spring primary. "See me the day after the (Nov. 4) election," a grinning Rendell told a reporter who asked about his plans yesterday. Rendell, who appeared at a press conference on adult illiteracy with Democratic gubernatorial candidate Robert P. Casey, fielded several questions about the possibility of his entering the mayor's race. Several Rendell associates say he's strongly leaning toward a City Hall run. Many Democrats believe he is the only Democrat who can beat Mayor Goode in the primary, but some have expressed concern that such a race would seriously divide the party.
NEWS
June 17, 2007 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Displeased with the Philadelphia School Reform Commission, Gov. Rendell said in an exclusive interview he would consider replacing Chairman James Nevels if he had a candidate. Rendell said the commission had not given departing Philadelphia schools chief Paul Vallas the support his accomplishments deserved. "Right now, I'm not sure I've got a chairman candidate on the commission other than Mr. Nevels," Rendell said. "When I make my next appointment, I will be looking to appoint someone who can step in and be chairman.
NEWS
September 18, 2009 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His approval ratings may be tanking in Pennsylvania, but Gov. Rendell is top-of-the-charts in the eyes of Esquire. The magazine has included Rendell in its "World's 75 Best People" list. He joins actors Matt Damon and Robert Duvall, Bill and Hillary Clinton, investor Warren Buffett, and cartoon character Lisa Simpson. Here's how Esquire described its criteria: "There are many more do-gooders, but these particular men and women - because of their talent, achievements, virtue, and two other essential qualifications (having to do with puppies and drinking)
NEWS
May 28, 1986 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
During his unsuccessful campaign for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination, former Philadelphia District Attorney Edward G. Rendell assured Mayor Goode that he was not interested in the mayor's job. Whether Rendell will change his mind and enter the mayor's race in 1987 is still an open question that Rendell declines to answer. But those close to him say he is reluctant to get involved in what he expects to be a racially divisive campaign. Goode has said since the May 20 primary, as speculation has increased about Rendell's future, that the former district attorney had told him he would not challenge him for mayor.
NEWS
April 13, 2002 | By Thomas Fitzgerald INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Maybe Ed Rendell should stock some NoDoz on his campaign bus, because Bob Casey Jr. never runs out of videotape. Casey aides caught Rendell, 58, nodding off several times Wednesday during a late afternoon candidates' forum in Pittsburgh, and they later circulated the footage to reporters. The rival gubernatorial campaigns traded unpleasantries over the episode yesterday in the latest illustration of the negative tone of the race for the Democratic nomination. Casey aides have shadowed Rendell, the former mayor of Philadelphia, at all of his public events, recording his every move and utterance so the campaign can note his promises and compare his statements.
NEWS
January 22, 1986 | By BOB GROTEVANT, Daily News Staff Writer (Staff writer Ron Goldwyn contributed to this report.)
Former Philadelphia District Attorney Edward G. Rendell formally entered this year's gubernatorial race today, pledging that he will downplay public relations and concentrate on improving Pennsylvania's economy. "I'm not going to be the kind of governor who sits on his rear end in Harrisburg," Rendell said at the state Capitol Building in kicking off his campaign for the Democratic nomination. "I'm not going to care about how things look. I'm going to care about how things are. " Rendell, who earlier this month completed his second term as Philadelphia's chief prosecutor, was accompanied by his wife, Midge, the couple's 5-year-old son, Jesse, and several state lawmakers from Philadelphia.
NEWS
August 1, 2009 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Gov. Rendell and top legislative leaders met privately yesterday to try to revive state budget negotiations, which have been on life support for the last few weeks. Rendell met with House Appropriations Committee Chairman Dwight Evans (D., Phila.) as well as top Senate Republicans, including Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi (R., Delaware), at the governor's mansion for about 90 minutes. The legislators said the two sides had made progress, but declined to give specifics other than to confirm that another private session with Rendell had been scheduled for tomorrow morning.
NEWS
May 30, 2005
Without Gov. Rendell's efforts, legalized slots gambling wouldn't be coming to Pennsylvania at all. And without a "yes" vote from his appointees to the state's Gaming Control Board, no gambling operator will receive one of 14 lucrative licenses. Given such perceived clout, the governor must meet plenty of folks who hope to be his new best friend - none more so than those with designs on a gaming license or gambling-related interests. So Rendell needs to keep his distance from gambling executives.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|