CollectionsRenewable Energy
IN THE NEWS

Renewable Energy

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 23, 2007 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
SunTechnics Energy Systems Inc., a provider of renewable-energy systems, will base its East Coast headquarters in Malvern after acquiring Mesa Environmental Sciences Inc., which has offices in Malvern and Marlton. The acquisition, for an undisclosed amount, will allow the combined company, which will be named Mesa Energy L.L.C., to move forward on $50 million of potential projects, said Sarah Hetznecker, who founded Mesa five years ago with her husband, Gary Sheehan. Mesa's current staff of 16 will double within a year, she said, as the company hires engineers and installers.
NEWS
October 29, 2004 | By Jeanne M. Fox
Energy policy has a profound impact on nearly everything Americans hold important. The right policy can mean job creation, a thriving economy fueled by affordable energy and technological innovation, a cleaner environment, increased security, and a foreign policy liberated from energy dependence. Today, Americans are coping with the repercussions of the wrong national energy policy. Families struggle to pay the rising costs of heating their homes and fueling their cars. Businesses absorb the economic impact of poor electric reliability.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Don Hopey, PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE
Pennsylvania is providing $2.9 billion a year in subsidies to fossil-fuel industries, but not offering similar government supports and incentives to cleaner renewable-energy development, according to a report released Tuesday by the PennFuture Energy Center for Enterprise and the Environment. The biggest state fossil-fuel subsidies listed in the report, based on the governor's 2011-12 executive budget, are: $1.14 billion for gasoline and diesel fuel, $435 million for electricity, $322 million for fuel oil and natural gas - all exempt from various sales and use taxes - and $477 million for oil and gas local property-tax exemptions.
NEWS
July 17, 2001
We have heard the story of Paul Revere when he yelled, "The British are coming. " I am here today to tell you that the British are here and their company's name is Amergen. They are not dressed in red coats, but they are armed and dangerous, my fellow patriots. Amergen, a joint venture between British Energy Co. and Peco Energy Co., bought Oyster Creek Nuclear Plant in Ocean County last year for $10 million. That's cheaper than the salary of some baseball players. Amergen wants to store more radioactive waste.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Nancy Benac, Associated Press
LARGO, Md. - Vigorously defending his policies, President Obama ridiculed critics of renewable energy sources Thursday, calling them naysayers and comparing them to the flat-earthers of yesteryear. Obama did not mention his detractors by name, merely referring to them as "professional politicians. " But his targets were clear. "A lot of the folks who are running for a certain office who shall go unnamed, they've been talking down new sources of energy," Obama told a crowd of students at Prince George's Community College in Washington's Maryland suburbs.
NEWS
February 21, 2012
The Philadelphia Water Department has hired Ameresco, Inc., a Framingham, Mass., renewable-energy company, to design, build and maintain a biogas-burning cogeneration plant at its Northeast Water Pollution Control Plant. The $47.5 million project will generate 5.6 megawatts of electricity and thermal energy for use at the treatment plant. Michael T. Bakas, Ameresco's senior vice president, said the project is sized based upon projections about how much biogas is produced from the decomposition of sewage in the plant's digesters.
NEWS
August 9, 2001
To promote renewable energy, we need to put business, technology, and environmental protection in harness together. Green technologies are on the verge of becoming one of the next waves in the knowledge economy revolution. The global market for environmental goods and services is projected to rise to [approximately $630 billion] by 2010. Shell estimates that 50 percent of the world's energy needs could be met by renewables by 2050. Wind power is already a [profitable] industry. By 2010, the global solar market [should rise significantly]
NEWS
June 7, 2011 | By Maya Rao, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Tuesday outlined a vision for New Jersey's energy future that focuses on nuclear, natural gas, and commercial solar power, and retreats from ambitious renewable energy goals. The governor introduced a long-awaited energy master plan at a news conference more than a year after his administration said it would revise the document developed under the previous administration to reflect the economic downturn. The release follows the governor's controversial announcement last week to pull New Jersey out of a multistate cap-and-trade agreement for greenhouse gas emissions, a key part of Gov. Jon S. Corzine's energy plan.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2013 | By Jonathan Fahey, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Renewable energy is growing fast around the world and will edge out natural gas as the second-biggest source of electricity, after coal, by 2016, according to a five-year outlook published Wednesday by the International Energy Agency. Developing countries are building more wind, solar, and hydroelectric power plants to meet rising power demand and combat local pollution problems. And the costs of renewables are falling below the cost of traditional power sources such as coal, natural gas, and oil in some markets with high-priced power.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 9, 2016
ISSUE | ENVIRONMENT Electing renewable-energy backers is critical Pope Francis provided heroic leadership in his call to all people of faith to adopt personal practices of environmental stewardship, such as turning off lights not in use and taking public transportation or carpooling ("Pope elevates care for planet to an eighth work of mercy," Friday). Framing them as "works of mercy" makes a clear connection between environmental stewardship and spiritual practice. While these small acts of personal environmental piety are a necessary foundation, they will not be enough to bend the arc of climate change toward a sustainable environment.
NEWS
July 23, 2016
ISSUE | FRACKING Air quality at risk A study showing that fracking may be worsening asthma for those who live near such oil- and gas-drilling operations should not come as a surprise ("Fracking may worsen asthma for nearby residents, study says," Philly.com, Monday). We already know that oil and gas infrastructure leaks smog-forming compounds and toxic pollutants into our air at an alarming rate, and the findings published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine are only the latest in a string of research conducted in Pennsylvania showing correlations between fracking and health issues.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
More than 66,000 Pennsylvanians worked last year in the clean energy industry at 5,900 businesses, up 15.7 percent from 2014, according to a report compiled by two advocacy groups. About 53,000 Pennsylvanians work in the energy-efficiency sector, including manufacturers of equipment and installers of high-efficiency systems, according to the report by the Keystone Energy Efficiency Alliance and Environmental Entrepreneurs. Another 8,800 worked in renewable energy, including about 5,200 who spend at least half their time working in solar.
NEWS
July 5, 2016 | By Michaelle Bond, Staff Writer
Power outages could be a worry of the past for businesses in one Chester County township if a proposed solar-powered electrical grid becomes reality. Developers want to build one of the region's first solar microgrids on what was once a problem-plagued landfill in East Whiteland Township. The $15 million system would have more than 11,000 solar panels spanning 30 acres, and produce six to seven megawatts of power specifically for local businesses. A microgrid can connect to an area's main electrical grid, or it can function autonomously, continuing to run during mass outages due, for example, to severe weather.
NEWS
May 25, 2016
By Michael Brune Clean energy is already replacing fossil fuels. The truth is, just as computers replaced typewriters and cellphones replaced landlines, modern clean energy will replace outdated fossil fuels - it's just a matter of how quickly. And that's because people around the country are starting to see that the transition from dirty fossil fuels like coal, oil, and gas to clean energy is best viewed not as an obligation but as an opportunity. We're all familiar with the problems that should motivate us to move beyond dirty fuels: air pollution and asthma, water pollution, climate instability, volatile prices, and reliance on overseas oil sources.
NEWS
April 19, 2016
ISSUE | CAMPAIGN 2016 McGinty the best Democrat for Senate seat In its endorsement of Joe Sestak for U.S. Senate ("Sestak gets primary nod," April 10), the Inquirer gave short shrift to Katie McGinty's candidacy, saying her campaign has not shown that she is ready for the Senate. Fitness for office should be judged by the candidate's experience and performance in other jobs, not by four months of the campaign: As head of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, McGinty drove an agenda that delivered historic gains on renewable energy and ecosystem protection, ensured clean air and water, and restored Florida's Everglades.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Lab has selected the Navy Yard and its "microgrid" as the site for a study on new technology for advanced electrical distribution and controls, the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. announced Tuesday. The study, which will take advantage of the Navy Yard's advanced power grid, will focus on how to make local electric distribution systems more reliable and create capabilities for the energy industry to deploy renewable energy within local communities, PIDC said.
NEWS
March 10, 2016
ISSUE | FRACKING Health, jobs suffer A commentary failed to mention the negative impacts of fracking ("Fracking is key to expansion of Pa. manufacturing," Friday). Studies have shown that pollution from gas infrastructure has devastating health impacts on nearby communities, such as increased hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease. Air pollution-leaks from the gas industry include methane, a potent greenhouse gas that exacerbates climate change. Fortunately, Gov. Wolf recently announced a plan to significantly slash such leaks.
NEWS
February 27, 2016
ISSUE | NUCLEAR POWER Pro: Clean, cheap, and reliable The production of clean electrical energy is getting a boost from nuclear power. Developments to expand and extend the use of nuclear plants include: The U.S. Department of Energy's granting of a permit that could lead to construction of a small modular reactor in Idaho. The NuScale SMR would be situated below ground and produce 50 megawatts of electricity for a fraction of the cost of building a large power plant. Its innovative design eliminates many of the valves, pumps, and pipes used in nuclear plants.
NEWS
January 4, 2016
ISSUE | ENERGY N.J.'s green goals The New Jersey Senate passed a bill last month that establishes renewable-energy portfolio standards and requires a percentage of our electricity to come from Class I renewable energy. This percentage would increase every five years to 2050, with a goal of reaching 80 percent renewable. The bill, which was referred to the Assembly Telecommunications and Utilities Committee, needs to be posted by Jan. 11 to pass the Assembly. Solar, wind, and geothermal power, microgrids, and wave technologies can be used to reach these goals.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|