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Renovation

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NEWS
March 29, 1992 | By Donald D. Groff, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Smithsonian Institution's popular Insect Zoo will undergo a $500,000 renovation through the largesse of - get this - an extermination company. Atlanta-based Orkin Pest Control will fund the renovation as well as education programs for students and teachers. The rebuilt zoo will include an aquatic exhibit, rain forest and desert environs, and a backyard exhibit to help identify insects around the home. Ironically, the only termites currently at the Insect Zoo are not formally on display.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
Strawbridge & Clothier this month undertook renovation of the interior of its department store in the Exton Square shopping mall. The new look will cost Strawbridge & Clothier $1.14 million, according to a building permit issued for the construction. The renovation work is expected to last until October. The store will have new wall facades, arches, carpets and drop ceilings, and shiny new lighting fixtures. "It's part of an ongoing renovation program," said William Timmons, public relations representative for the Strawbridge stores.
NEWS
April 14, 2002
Philadelphia's Fairmount Park Commission is planning a renovation of LOVE Park that would end its status as a skateboarding mecca. Should it proceed with those plans, alter the plans to accommodate both skaters and other users, or is there another way to go? Tell us how you'd design LOVE Park. Send essays of about 150 words by April 22, including a phone number for verification, to Voices/LOVE, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Most renovation work in the Colonial School District should be completed by the start of the school year, Superintendent Richard Creasey told the school board Thursday night. "If you were to walk through the (Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School) building today, you'd see that 85 to 90 percent of all the lighting, ceiling work, carpeting and painting is completed, and that's good, because those are the last things that have to be done," he said. Creasey said much of the summer was spent restoring floors, ceilings and walls in the high school, which is in the final stages of a major renovation.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2001 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The six-year-old downtown Philadelphia Marriott is about to undergo its first major makeover. New mattresses, bedspreads, carpet and wallpaper are part of an $11 million room renovation project that is expected to begin Sept. 15 and end Feb. 1. "The renovation really shows Marriott's commitment to the city of Philadelphia," Matthew Carroll, a spokesman for Marriott International Inc., said. The $200 million hotel, with 1,400 rooms and an indoor walkway to the Convention Center, is considered an integral part of the city's convention business.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | By Melody Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At least 370 students will step off the school bus this week at newly renovated Primos Elementary School. "Primos will make you proud," Assistant Superintendent James Blackburn told Upper Darby School District board members Tuesday night. The two-story school on Bunting Lane in the Primos section of Upper Darby was closed in 1981 because of declining enrollment. Now enrollment is increasing, officials said. About $3.1 million was spent this year on new windows, carpets, paint, telephone and electrical systems as well as fees to the project manager and architect, Nancy DeLibero, assistant business manager, said in an interview.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The $14.07 million plan to renovate and expand Upper Merion Area High School moved a step closer to implementation Wednesday night as the school board considered recommendations on project approvals from school officials. At the school board's workshop meeting, John E. Schank, director of business affairs, asked the board to approve specific projects that would renovate the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems; add to the athletic wing; relocate the library, and renovate the old library into a medical suite.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judy Faulkner and Edith Silberstein say that when they look around at the Victorian-era houses of Merchantville, they see many of those homes in some state of historic restoration - perhaps an old porch is being rebuilt, or unattractive siding is being removed. "There's a real surge in restoration that we've noticed just on the exteriors of homes . . . within the last six months or year," Faulkner said. Those sights please the two women particularly, since Silberstein is the president and Faulkner is the secretary of the Merchantville Historical Society.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Jonathan Berr, Special to The Inquirer
The Northampton Board of Supervisors voted to accept three bids for renovations to the township building at Wednesday night's meeting. H.C. Brody of Philadelphia was awarded a $380,445 contract for the general- contracting work, while Robert's Servicing of Warminster was awarded a $118,000 plumbing contract. The $27,800 electrical contract was awarded to John W. Kay Inc. of Richboro. The supervisors also voted to allocate $9,459. to the Tri-Hampton Rescue squad to help the squad pay for worker's compensation insurance to cover paid employes.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Merion Area school board has named the Quandel Group Inc. to be construction managers for its $13.6 million project to renovate the high school. The board picked the Harrisburg company Monday. There were 12 other applicants for the job. Quandel specializes in renovation and construction projects for school districts across Pennsylvania. The school board had unanimously approved a bond issue in late May to finance the renovations. Upper Merion's plan calls for major renovations in almost every part of the high school complex.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local aviation enthusiasts are setting their sights high with a proposed renovation of the Wings of Freedom museum in Horsham, hoping that it could someday rival the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum. The designs, unveiled Friday at a fund-raiser in Blue Bell, call for a $24 million, green-certified campus to replace the existing museum. The planes now displayed on the lawn would move inside an all-glass exhibit hall. A circuitous, multilevel viewing path would showcase the planes from above and below.
NEWS
September 14, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
After a summer of hard work by volunteers from its congregation, assisted by one apparent miracle, Trinity Presbyterian Church in Cherry Hill is ready to celebrate its renovated sanctuary. Tired of the lackluster appearance of the worship space, and with a big milestone approaching - the 50th anniversary - church members decided this year it was time for a makeover. In June, with a slew of projects and limited funds, the volunteers gathered in the sanctuary with ladders, paint brushes, and power tools, and took on the laborious tasks themselves.
REAL_ESTATE
September 8, 2014 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Redo, don't relocate : It's a spreading mantra among homeowners who already live in desirable neighborhoods in the Philadelphia region. For myriad reasons - lack of equity, love of neighbors and neighborhood, the abject refusal to pack even one box - people who once might have moved when house and stage of life didn't match are choosing an alternative route: Instead of combing real estate ads for the right houses, they're transforming where...
NEWS
September 7, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The multiyear transformation of an asbestos-laced abandoned boiler house into a green office complex in Ambler, the installation of a Horace Trumbauer-designed ceiling for the Lincoln Ballroom of the Union League on Broad Street, and the conversion of the deteriorating Nugent Home for Baptists in Germantown into apartments were among winners of statewide historic-preservation awards announced Thursday. Preservation Pennsylvania, an educational and advocacy group in Harrisburg, said this year's winners of its annual awards represented the fruits of patience and cooperation.
NEWS
September 4, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
A multimillion-dollar renovation of the Burlington County courthouse complex, focused on security enhancements, will cost nearly twice the original estimate, according to county documents obtained by The Inquirer. The tab for the work, which was scheduled to begin this week, has grown to at least $9.4 million from the $4.8 million price tag put on it after it was announced in December 2012. As the project evolved, "further safety and security concerns" were addressed and the cost rose "to reflect the additional work required," according to county spokesman Eric Arpert.
NEWS
September 2, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Rutgers-Camden students assiduously avoided studying in the dark, dusty library basement, crammed in between book stacks with asbestos tile and the ghostly noises of a building built in the middle of the last century. Not that things were ideal elsewhere in the library, where book stacks across two floors limited seating and study areas, a lack of electrical outlets led students to bring their own extension cords, and piecemeal furniture replacement led to a grab-bag vision of interior design.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
OK, SO IT'S $5 million over budget and about five months late, but the completion of Dilworth Plaza on City Hall's western front is only a few weeks away, officials said yesterday. Imagine bubbling urban fountains, vast green spaces, live music and an outdoor cafe that serves food by day and alcohol after 5 p.m. It's all coming to fruition in the form of Dilworth Park , the city's lively new centerpiece scheduled for a ribbon-cutting at 11 a.m. Sept. 4. For more than two years, the once-drab, concrete underground maze known as Dilworth Plaza has been getting a face-lift, with fewer stairs and with elevators to ease foot traffic.
FOOD
August 15, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like every great home cook, Josephine Samuel has one legendary signature dish. "My mother showed me how to do fried chicken and how you make it taste real good," said Samuel, a Mantua resident. But, she added wistfully, "You can't eat fried chicken every night. " So, she enrolled in "Local Culinary Traditions," a new, free course offering from Drexel University's Center for Hospitality and Sports Management that invites West Philadelphia residents and any Drexel students to collaborate in documenting beloved family recipes and experimenting with making them healthier.
REAL_ESTATE
August 10, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
John and Erin O'Connor moved to Lafayette Hill so their teenage son could attend high school in the suburbs. But their new house on Andorra Road in Whitemarsh Township had an awkward kitchen layout. As they had already rehabbed their last house in Chestnut Hill, the O'Connors were game for a renovation. But they didn't want to spend a fortune. Enter Main Line Kitchen Design of Narberth, whose team brainstormed the details of a remodeling costing $40,000 to $80,000 - one that opened up the O'Connors' dark kitchen with a glass range hood and a full view of the backyard through a wall of windows.
NEWS
August 2, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has received a $5 million grant from the state to help fund $150 million to $160 million in major renovations and upgrades to the main building and its nearly 500,000 square feet of interior space. The renovations are a critical part of a long-planned transformation and expansion, which ultimately will include new gallery spaces beneath the museum terrace at the end of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The state funds, however, will not go toward creation of any new galleries - under the terrace or within the museum - nor will they help create a new museum education center.
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