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Renovation

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NEWS
March 29, 1992 | By Donald D. Groff, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Smithsonian Institution's popular Insect Zoo will undergo a $500,000 renovation through the largesse of - get this - an extermination company. Atlanta-based Orkin Pest Control will fund the renovation as well as education programs for students and teachers. The rebuilt zoo will include an aquatic exhibit, rain forest and desert environs, and a backyard exhibit to help identify insects around the home. Ironically, the only termites currently at the Insect Zoo are not formally on display.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
Strawbridge & Clothier this month undertook renovation of the interior of its department store in the Exton Square shopping mall. The new look will cost Strawbridge & Clothier $1.14 million, according to a building permit issued for the construction. The renovation work is expected to last until October. The store will have new wall facades, arches, carpets and drop ceilings, and shiny new lighting fixtures. "It's part of an ongoing renovation program," said William Timmons, public relations representative for the Strawbridge stores.
NEWS
April 14, 2002
Philadelphia's Fairmount Park Commission is planning a renovation of LOVE Park that would end its status as a skateboarding mecca. Should it proceed with those plans, alter the plans to accommodate both skaters and other users, or is there another way to go? Tell us how you'd design LOVE Park. Send essays of about 150 words by April 22, including a phone number for verification, to Voices/LOVE, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Most renovation work in the Colonial School District should be completed by the start of the school year, Superintendent Richard Creasey told the school board Thursday night. "If you were to walk through the (Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School) building today, you'd see that 85 to 90 percent of all the lighting, ceiling work, carpeting and painting is completed, and that's good, because those are the last things that have to be done," he said. Creasey said much of the summer was spent restoring floors, ceilings and walls in the high school, which is in the final stages of a major renovation.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2001 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The six-year-old downtown Philadelphia Marriott is about to undergo its first major makeover. New mattresses, bedspreads, carpet and wallpaper are part of an $11 million room renovation project that is expected to begin Sept. 15 and end Feb. 1. "The renovation really shows Marriott's commitment to the city of Philadelphia," Matthew Carroll, a spokesman for Marriott International Inc., said. The $200 million hotel, with 1,400 rooms and an indoor walkway to the Convention Center, is considered an integral part of the city's convention business.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | By Melody Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At least 370 students will step off the school bus this week at newly renovated Primos Elementary School. "Primos will make you proud," Assistant Superintendent James Blackburn told Upper Darby School District board members Tuesday night. The two-story school on Bunting Lane in the Primos section of Upper Darby was closed in 1981 because of declining enrollment. Now enrollment is increasing, officials said. About $3.1 million was spent this year on new windows, carpets, paint, telephone and electrical systems as well as fees to the project manager and architect, Nancy DeLibero, assistant business manager, said in an interview.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The $14.07 million plan to renovate and expand Upper Merion Area High School moved a step closer to implementation Wednesday night as the school board considered recommendations on project approvals from school officials. At the school board's workshop meeting, John E. Schank, director of business affairs, asked the board to approve specific projects that would renovate the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems; add to the athletic wing; relocate the library, and renovate the old library into a medical suite.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judy Faulkner and Edith Silberstein say that when they look around at the Victorian-era houses of Merchantville, they see many of those homes in some state of historic restoration - perhaps an old porch is being rebuilt, or unattractive siding is being removed. "There's a real surge in restoration that we've noticed just on the exteriors of homes . . . within the last six months or year," Faulkner said. Those sights please the two women particularly, since Silberstein is the president and Faulkner is the secretary of the Merchantville Historical Society.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Jonathan Berr, Special to The Inquirer
The Northampton Board of Supervisors voted to accept three bids for renovations to the township building at Wednesday night's meeting. H.C. Brody of Philadelphia was awarded a $380,445 contract for the general- contracting work, while Robert's Servicing of Warminster was awarded a $118,000 plumbing contract. The $27,800 electrical contract was awarded to John W. Kay Inc. of Richboro. The supervisors also voted to allocate $9,459. to the Tri-Hampton Rescue squad to help the squad pay for worker's compensation insurance to cover paid employes.
NEWS
February 14, 1988 | By Charles McCurdy, Special to The Inquirer
Bids were opened for the renovation of the West Goshen township building by the one supervisor attending the Tuesday night supervisors meeting. But a contractor will not be selected until the township engineer reviews the bids and makes a recommendation to all three supervisors. Renovations are to include the expansion of the building to create more office space and the construction of a new township garage. Thirteen bids for general construction were submitted, ranging from a high of $453,935 to a low of $333,700.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, Culture Writer
Past and future have long nestled up against each other at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, but rarely as expectantly as they do at this moment. The basement of the Hamilton Building is composed of sleek, new materials, and then you venture beyond a door into a space now raw but destined to become a discrete new 250-seat performing venue for burgeoning North Broad Street. A dowdy back-alley entrance soon will be reconstructed to ease handicapped visitors into the museum - a stylish stroke of building-code compliance more than a quarter-century after the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law. History and possibility hover hopefully around PAFA's campus because the museum and school has now reached the halfway point in a capital campaign to pay for a long list of improvements.
NEWS
July 13, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
The city has ordered a stop to renovations at a Washington Square site because vibrations from the work were threatening a hundred-year-old Maxfield Parrish mural in the building, officials said Monday. The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, which owns the Dream Garden mural in the Curtis Center, alerted the city about its concerns Thursday. The city issued an order halting construction the next day. The city said work would be suspended until stronger protections for the mural, which is made up of hundreds of thousands of pieces of glass, are put in place.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
"When they pulled up the rug," Deborah Marchand says, "they found this . " We're admiring a glorious terrazzo floor under the rotunda of the Haddonfield Public Library, where a $2.2 million, 15-month restoration, renovation, and repurposing project is nearly complete. The goal, library board president Marchand adds, was "to take what had been a fairly inflexible space and make it more flexible and open and welcoming. " Haddonfield has done all that and then some: A sneak peek last week left me impressed by how seamlessly the old has been freshened up and blended with the new inside the Monticello-esque landmark at Tanner Street and Haddon Avenue.
NEWS
May 16, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The Camden County Historical Society is back, and so are "Nipper," Lord Camden, and former Camden Mayor Gwendolyn Faison. The society's grand reopening Sunday will feature a new, permanent display of an original stained-glass window depicting the trademark RCA-Victor terrier. A recently restored Raphael Senseman portrait of the British aristocrat for whom the city is named, and a panoramic new mural by Philadelphia artist Donna M. Backues, highlighting notables such as Faison, also will greet visitors for the first time.
REAL_ESTATE
April 25, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
A few weeks back, the phone company came to my house to upgrade the landline service to fiber optic from copper. I had received a letter a month before asking me to make an appointment to have this done - otherwise I'd lose landline service sometime in March. I took it as a "so what" threat because the only time the landline is used is to disregard telemarketing calls, maybe six a week. I know that $58.57 a month for phone service that pretty much goes unused is a waste of money, but maybe the next owner of my house might consider it important, so I decided what the heck and made the appointment.
SPORTS
April 20, 2016 | By Mike Jensen, STAFF WRITER
Villanova athletic director Mark Jackson realizes he isn't the type to sit stone-faced on press row watching a Wildcats team. In Houston, Jackson went for the front row of Villanova's fan section in the stands during the Final Four. "I try to stay calm and cool," Jackson said last week. But the last couple of minutes of a game for a national championship? "I couldn't really function. I couldn't speak. I remember my wife whispering in my ear, 'Are you sure you want to do this for the rest of your life?
REAL_ESTATE
March 20, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
Five hundred ninety units of affordable senior housing in two Philadelphia neighborhoods are being given a new lease on life. Vitus Group, which has offices in Seattle and New York, is upgrading the apartments, development director Scott Langan said, "to make them solid and stable for the next 30 years. " Vitus, which worked primarily on the West Coast until about five years ago, rehabilitates existing housing and builds new properties, he said. The apartments are in two high-rise buildings the company acquired - Four Freedoms House at 6101 Morris St. in Germantown and Philip Murray House at 6300 Old York Rd. in West Oak Lane.
REAL_ESTATE
March 20, 2016 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
In that first moment, when you get past the front door and step inside the South Philadelphia home of Barbara Capozzi and Frank Scaramuzza, your jaw simply drops. There before you: open space, textures, bright white walls, and, yes, a sculpture of a gentleman on a unicycle holding a bunch of balloons. It's a lot to take in. But it's also, in a seeming contradiction, a minimalist vista. Seems that this couple has figured out the unique balancing act of warming a home with whimsy and still keeping it cool with an open design that features modernity and an almost geometric feel.
REAL_ESTATE
March 20, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
This is what I will describe as a who-does-what and what-to-do column. Among the roughly 1,350 homeowners surveyed nationally in late December and early January for TD Bank's first Home Equity Sentiment Index, 56 percent of the respondents said they believed that their home's value had increased, and 60 percent said they would tap that rising equity to finance renovations. Fifty-three percent of millennials said they also were considering such a move. Renovations at the top of most consumers' lists include kitchens (42 percent)
BUSINESS
March 6, 2016
Where: Center City. Average annual revenue: $100 million. Employees: 23 in Center City office; 75-150 on site. History: Founded in 1979 by Jim Clemens. Projects: Apartments, retail, hotels, university, historic work in 13 states. In Philadelphia: Cheesecake Factory, 1128 Chestnut St., Warwick Hotel renovation, Southstar Lofts.
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