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Renovation

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NEWS
March 29, 1992 | By Donald D. Groff, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
The Smithsonian Institution's popular Insect Zoo will undergo a $500,000 renovation through the largesse of - get this - an extermination company. Atlanta-based Orkin Pest Control will fund the renovation as well as education programs for students and teachers. The rebuilt zoo will include an aquatic exhibit, rain forest and desert environs, and a backyard exhibit to help identify insects around the home. Ironically, the only termites currently at the Insect Zoo are not formally on display.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | By Ann Marie Escher, Special to The Inquirer
Strawbridge & Clothier this month undertook renovation of the interior of its department store in the Exton Square shopping mall. The new look will cost Strawbridge & Clothier $1.14 million, according to a building permit issued for the construction. The renovation work is expected to last until October. The store will have new wall facades, arches, carpets and drop ceilings, and shiny new lighting fixtures. "It's part of an ongoing renovation program," said William Timmons, public relations representative for the Strawbridge stores.
NEWS
April 14, 2002
Philadelphia's Fairmount Park Commission is planning a renovation of LOVE Park that would end its status as a skateboarding mecca. Should it proceed with those plans, alter the plans to accommodate both skaters and other users, or is there another way to go? Tell us how you'd design LOVE Park. Send essays of about 150 words by April 22, including a phone number for verification, to Voices/LOVE, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.
NEWS
August 21, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Most renovation work in the Colonial School District should be completed by the start of the school year, Superintendent Richard Creasey told the school board Thursday night. "If you were to walk through the (Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School) building today, you'd see that 85 to 90 percent of all the lighting, ceiling work, carpeting and painting is completed, and that's good, because those are the last things that have to be done," he said. Creasey said much of the summer was spent restoring floors, ceilings and walls in the high school, which is in the final stages of a major renovation.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2001 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The six-year-old downtown Philadelphia Marriott is about to undergo its first major makeover. New mattresses, bedspreads, carpet and wallpaper are part of an $11 million room renovation project that is expected to begin Sept. 15 and end Feb. 1. "The renovation really shows Marriott's commitment to the city of Philadelphia," Matthew Carroll, a spokesman for Marriott International Inc., said. The $200 million hotel, with 1,400 rooms and an indoor walkway to the Convention Center, is considered an integral part of the city's convention business.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | By Melody Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At least 370 students will step off the school bus this week at newly renovated Primos Elementary School. "Primos will make you proud," Assistant Superintendent James Blackburn told Upper Darby School District board members Tuesday night. The two-story school on Bunting Lane in the Primos section of Upper Darby was closed in 1981 because of declining enrollment. Now enrollment is increasing, officials said. About $3.1 million was spent this year on new windows, carpets, paint, telephone and electrical systems as well as fees to the project manager and architect, Nancy DeLibero, assistant business manager, said in an interview.
NEWS
February 21, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The $14.07 million plan to renovate and expand Upper Merion Area High School moved a step closer to implementation Wednesday night as the school board considered recommendations on project approvals from school officials. At the school board's workshop meeting, John E. Schank, director of business affairs, asked the board to approve specific projects that would renovate the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems; add to the athletic wing; relocate the library, and renovate the old library into a medical suite.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Judy Faulkner and Edith Silberstein say that when they look around at the Victorian-era houses of Merchantville, they see many of those homes in some state of historic restoration - perhaps an old porch is being rebuilt, or unattractive siding is being removed. "There's a real surge in restoration that we've noticed just on the exteriors of homes . . . within the last six months or year," Faulkner said. Those sights please the two women particularly, since Silberstein is the president and Faulkner is the secretary of the Merchantville Historical Society.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | By Jonathan Berr, Special to The Inquirer
The Northampton Board of Supervisors voted to accept three bids for renovations to the township building at Wednesday night's meeting. H.C. Brody of Philadelphia was awarded a $380,445 contract for the general- contracting work, while Robert's Servicing of Warminster was awarded a $118,000 plumbing contract. The $27,800 electrical contract was awarded to John W. Kay Inc. of Richboro. The supervisors also voted to allocate $9,459. to the Tri-Hampton Rescue squad to help the squad pay for worker's compensation insurance to cover paid employes.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | By Rob Wingate, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Merion Area school board has named the Quandel Group Inc. to be construction managers for its $13.6 million project to renovate the high school. The board picked the Harrisburg company Monday. There were 12 other applicants for the job. Quandel specializes in renovation and construction projects for school districts across Pennsylvania. The school board had unanimously approved a bond issue in late May to finance the renovations. Upper Merion's plan calls for major renovations in almost every part of the high school complex.
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BUSINESS
August 27, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
A New Jersey real estate investment firm has purchased Camden's Liberty Park Townhomes affordable-housing complex and plans $1.5 million in renovations at the site in exchange for tax abatements. Tryko Partners bought the 184-unit property from Vesta Corp. of Connecticut, according to a statement from the Brick, N.J.-based company, which did not disclose the purchase price. Tryko, which specializes in affordable-housing projects, will re-side all buildings, replace windows, repair sewage lines, and complete other improvements through its PILOT, or "payment in lieu of taxes," deal with the City of Camden.
REAL_ESTATE
August 10, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
It's common for empty-nester suburbanites to move to Center City, lured by its walkability, restaurants, and cultural scene. The vast majority are purchasing condos in high-rise buildings, and a growing number are combining two adjacent units to capture some of the space they left behind. Then there are Terri and Mark Steinberg, longtime residents of what she called "rural and really lonely" Chester County. Instead of moving to a spanking-new, steel-and-glass high-rise on Rittenhouse Square, the Steinbergs bought and rehabbed an early 19th-century rowhouse just off the square - a home that, by design, will be age- and infirmities-proof.
NEWS
August 5, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Michael Manerchia, a heavy-equipment operator, found pieces of a broken plate under the flooring of a home he was renovating in Marcus Hook, he had no idea that he had opened a treasure chest of history. Not quite knowing what he had, he consulted a friend who is a local historian. He suggested probing further. A hole punched in the plaster revealed five-inch-thick walls made of wooden planks. Manerchia had purchased a rare "Plank House" - constructed with materials harvested from a ship dating from the early 18th Century.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Erin Edinger-Turoff, Inquirer Staff Writer
Under a hazy sun on the banks of the Schuylkill, city and Temple University officials Thursday marked the on-schedule and on-budget start of the restoration of the East Park Canoe House, the historic - and once-condemned - home of Temple's rowing teams. The boathouse, which had sat unused since being condemned in 2008, got a new breath of life last February, when the city announced that it would kick in $2.5 million and that Temple trustee and philanthropist H.F. "Gerry" Lenfest would donate $3 million to renovate the 100-year-old brick-and-stucco building.
NEWS
July 25, 2015 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
With imminent renovation of the two-block-long Gallery mall on Market Street, its owners are faced with a vexing problem: What to do about the public art installed decades ago, fruit of the Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority's Percent-for-Art program? All public art in the Gallery must be removed by the end of November, according to the authority. As of now, none of the work has officially found a new home. One piece is of particular concern to officials - Larry Rivers' massive tile mural, Philadelphia Now and Then , which not only faces homelessness, but has suffered serious damage over the years.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The plan for a $325 million remake of the sagging Gallery mall sailed through City Council on Thursday, and the package of enabling legislation was quickly signed by Mayor Nutter. Now all they have to do is build it. "This is, quite honestly, a once-in-a-generation investment in the city of Philadelphia," Nutter said, adding that the project would help "restore Market East as Philadelphia's Main Street. " Demolition is expected to start in August, with the mall closing in two phases.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER jadelman@phillynews.com 215-854-2615 @jacobadelman
New York-based Carey Watermark Investors plans a $21.3 million renovation of the Ritz-Carlton Philadelphia hotel after acquiring a majority interest in the property, the company said in a release. The renovation, to be done in a joint venture with previous full-owner Philadelphia Hospitality Partners, will cover the South Broad Street hotel's 299 guest rooms, lobby, ballroom and other spaces, Carey Watermark said. Work is due to be completed before the end of June 2016, the company said.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The developers for the planned revamp of the Gallery mall could not raise enough money to finish the project without a tax break that must be cleared by City Council, a city adviser on the deal said. The big reason is deferred maintenance by the city's redevelopment agency, the Gallery's owner. Catching up would wreck a private investor's returns, said John Grady, president of the Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. So gallery operator Pennsylvania Real Estate Investment Trust and mall developer Macerich Co. are asking the city to let them keep $127.5 million in taxes over 20 years.
REAL_ESTATE
April 13, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tara Woodend wanted to buy and develop property in a South Jersey town where real estate would hold its value at the very least - or, she hoped, rise. The Medford native found an investor partner, and together they bought four dilapidated houses built in the 1920s in Haddonfield. She's living in one completed rehab now and developing the other three houses in similar fashion. The Wilkins Avenue properties line up along a small side street near the Haddonfield PATCO station. All four were dated and in need of an overhaul inside and out. Woodend, educated as an interior designer, could see the beauty beneath the old, rugged structures and gave each a two-story addition.
NEWS
April 3, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long-awaited renovation and expansion of the Haddonfield Public Library is about to begin. A $2.2 million bid for the construction project is expected to be awarded around April 14. The library's last day for visits until the project is completed around the end of the year will be April 19, said library director Susan Briant. But the people of Haddonfield will not be library-less all those months. Around May 11, a temporary annex will open at 123 Kings Highway East, formerly a shop, offering some of the more high-demand collections, computer services, and some children's and teen collections.
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