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NEWS
February 5, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
LONDON - Gov. Christie ended his trip to the United Kingdom on Tuesday with scant comment, a day after his remarks on vaccinations stoked debate back home. The governor, a potential 2016 Republican presidential candidate, canceled scheduled media availabilities and made limited public remarks during his third and final day in London, where he met privately with financial executives, visited a home for women in an addiction recovery program, and had lunch with the British government's top financial official.
NEWS
August 31, 2010 | Daily News Staff Report
Lisa Hillary has joined Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia as the Flyers reporter. She replaces John Boruk, who has becomes a full-time anchor and reporter. Hillary spent three seasons as CSN Mid-Atlantic's Capitals reporter. She previously worked as a reporter and anchor with several major television outlets in Canada, where she spent time covering the NHL for two national sports networks, The Sports Network (TSN) and The Score. Boruk spent four seasons as CSN's Flyers reporter.
NEWS
October 27, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Police yesterday met with Fox 29 reporter Claudia Gomez and a criminal-defense attorney representing her regarding alleged removal of ID cards belonging to Jean McIntosh from the Tacony house where McIntosh lived, Philly.com reported. Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey wants a grand jury to look into the alleged incident, the website's "The Gossip with Marnie Hall" said. Meanwhile, CBS 3 reported last night that cops are looking into the possibility that Linda Ann Weston might be linked to the 2005 death of a woman in Castor Gardens.
NEWS
February 15, 2000 | ELWOOD P. SMITH/ DAILY NEWS
Daily News staffer Julie Knipe Brown was honored last night by the Philadelphia Firefighters Union, Local 22, for her series of stories on hepatitis-C. With Brown are union president George Casey (left) and vice president Tom O'Drain.
NEWS
January 1, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert A. Thomas, 75, a trailblazing reporter with The Philadelphia Inquirer who went on to a career in the foreign service, died of heart failure Dec. 21 at his home in Folsom, Calif. In 1952, Mr. Thomas joined the staff of The Inquirer as a copyboy. Two years later, he wrote a story about a black street gang and was promoted to staff reporter. "He was the first black reporter to work at The Inquirer," said Inquirer Associate Editor and columnist Acel Moore, who joined the paper in 1962.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gaeton Fonzi, 76, an investigative reporter for Philadelphia Magazine from 1959 to 1972 who later published his own conspiracy theory of the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, died Thursday, Aug. 30, of Parkinson's disease at his home in Satellite Beach, Fla. "He was relentless," D. Herbert Lipson, chairman of Metrocorp, owner of Philadelphia and Boston Magazines, recalled. That intensity carried on after Mr. Fonzi left Philadelphia. "His whole obsession was the Kennedy assassination," Marie, his wife of 55 years, said.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | Letters to the Daily News Editor
I GUESS THE LIBERAL press will be building it own "wailing wall" because of one reporter asking President Obama a question. All the reporters there chased him down to the Washington Monument, like the villagers going after Frankenstein's monster. I suppose they forgot how they hounded Richard Nixon, or Sam Donaldson yelling questions at Ronald Reagan, probably even as he was trying to go to the bathroom. They say Richard Nixon broke the law, but not as much as Obama has tried to destroy our Constitution.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
A reporter for the liberal online news service OpEdNews filed suit Thursday in U.S. District Court alleging that Philadelphia police improperly targeted her for arrest during a demonstration against military recruiting at Franklin Mills Mall in 2009. The demonstration attracted counter-demonstrators, and the two groups were monitored by the Philadelphia Police Department's Civil Affairs Unit. Photographer and writer Cheryl Biren-Wright said she was taking photographs for the news service when police singled her out from among other media representatives, seized her camera, and placed her under arrest.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doris B. Wiley, 91, a Philadelphia newspaper reporter for more than 40 years who covered hard news with the best of them, "interviewed" Morris the cat of 9Lives cat food fame, and parachuted from a plane to write about a New Jersey flight school, died of pancreatic cancer Monday at Paoli Hospital. She was a longtime resident of Rosemont. Born in 1916, the former Doris Boyer was the daughter of Mabel and Carl Boyer - he was director of the Wagner Free Institute of Science in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 16, 2013
Murrey Marder, 93, a Washington Post reporter whose tenacious coverage of Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist crusade foreshadowed the senator's downfall and disgrace, died March 11 at the Washington Home hospice. The cause was complications from a stroke last month, said his nephew Steve Marder. Mr. Marder's career spanned nearly eight decades, including World War II service in the South Pacific as a Marine Corps combat correspondent. He joined the Washington Post in 1946 and distinguished himself on the so-called Red Beat, the sensational trials and hearings about the alleged communist infiltration of government, Hollywood, and other industries.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pope Francis will visit inmates at a Philadelphia prison and speak on the plight of immigrants at Independence Hall during his visit to the United States in September, according to an unofficial draft itinerary obtained by the Washington Post. The pontiff will be in Philadelphia on Sept. 26 and 27, following the World Meeting of Families congress, which begins on Sept. 22. Officials have said the pope will attend the Saturday Festival of Families on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and celebrate Mass outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art on Sunday.
SPORTS
June 24, 2015
FOR 76ERS FANS who were hoping Dario Saric would get out of his contract in Turkey and join the team for the upcoming season, the news wasn't good yesterday. ESPN's Chad Ford got confirmation from Saric's agent that the forward would be playing for Turkish team Anadolu Efes this year. Reports had come out recently that the Sixers were trying to buy out Saric's contract in the hopes of adding him to the roster next season, but that has always been a long shot. He signed a three-year deal with the Turkish club just days before last year's draft, when he was taken 12th by the Orlando Magic, then dealt to the Sixers in a draft-night deal.
SPORTS
June 24, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers never had a chance at Kentucky's Karl-Anthony Towns once the Minnesota Timberwolves were awarded the first overall pick in the draft lottery last month. Once that happened, everyone knew that Towns, the headliner of this summer's draft class, was bound for the Twin Cities. And leading into the NBA draft Thursday at the Barclays Center, Towns' meeting with commissioner Adam Silver will be nothing more than a made-for-television formality. The New York website SNY.tv reported Monday that the Timberwolves told Towns he would be the No. 1 pick.
NEWS
June 18, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a fifth of Pennsylvania's foster children in 2012 were taking antipsychotics, powerful medications that can cause serious metabolic side effects, including rapid weight gain and diabetes. Yet most of them had not been found to have conditions proven to respond to such drugs, a study released Tuesday found. While the use of psychiatric drugs has declined slightly among Pennsylvania children on Medicaid, the study found that it remains high, especially among foster children.
SPORTS
June 17, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
BALTIMORE - Citing club policy, the Phillies declined to comment Monday on a CSNPhilly.com report that the organization is targeting longtime baseball executive Andy MacPhail for a front-office position. The report indicated it is unclear what role MacPhail would assume if he joined the team. Pat Gillick became the Phillies' president on a permanent basis in January but has said he doesn't envision himself in the role in two or three years. Gillick, 77, is in charge of baseball operations.
NEWS
June 13, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just in time for peak tick season, the Pennsylvania Department of Health this week announced that Lyme disease cases went up by a whopping 25 percent in a single year. Given the state often has more cases of the tick-borne infection than any other, this might worry anyone who spends time in the woods. But experts say a lot goes into reports such as this one, some of it concerning, some perplexing - and some reassuring. "We know Lyme is out there," said Atmaram Nambiar, director of the Division of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the Department of Health.
SPORTS
June 13, 2015 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
There may be a chance that Dario Saric will wear a 76ers uniform sooner than expected. The Sixers are negotiating with Anadolu Efes of the Turkish Basketball League to bring the forward to the NBA next season, according to Eurobasket.com. The Sixers acquired Saric's rights last year in the NBA draft. They traded their first-round pick, Elfrid Payton (10th overall), to the Orlando Magic for Saric, who was selected 12th, plus a 2017 top-11-protected pick and a 2015 second-rounder.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
PENNSYLVANIA received a "D" for the way it distributes K-12 education funding to school districts on a new report card from an education advocacy group. Titled "Is School Funding Fair? A National Report Card," the evaluation from Newark, N.J., -based Education Law Center says Pennsylvania is one of 14 states in the U.S. with a "regressive" school funding system which allocates less funding to districts with high levels of poverty. According to the organization's fourth report card, based on 2012 data, high-poverty districts in Pennsylvania received about 9 percent less per-pupil than wealthier districts.
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two presidents and a former president at Pennsylvania State University benefited from a collective $4.1 million in compensation in 2013-14, a report by the Chronicle of Higher Education shows. They include Rodney A. Erickson, who steered Pennsylvania's flagship university in the aftermath of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal and stepped down in May 2014; Eric Barron, who replaced Erickson; and former president Graham B. Spanier, who was forced out as president after the Sandusky scandal broke in November 2011 but who remains on the payroll as a tenured faculty member.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
At first blush, this is a headline screamer: Philadelphia region brings up the bottom in job recovery. How bad is it? So bad that the region's wretched post-recession job-growth performance makes the beleaguered city of Detroit look like a rock star, based on a Pew Trust analysis of U.S. Labor Department Statistics. Of the nation's 50 top metropolitan regions, Philadelphia ranked 47th, with 4.7 percent increase in jobs since the darkest days of the recession. At the top, San Jose, Calif., grew 23.7 percent, followed by Austin, Texas, at 22.6 percent, and Nashville at 19.3 percent.
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