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NEWS
August 31, 2010 | Daily News Staff Report
Lisa Hillary has joined Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia as the Flyers reporter. She replaces John Boruk, who has becomes a full-time anchor and reporter. Hillary spent three seasons as CSN Mid-Atlantic's Capitals reporter. She previously worked as a reporter and anchor with several major television outlets in Canada, where she spent time covering the NHL for two national sports networks, The Sports Network (TSN) and The Score. Boruk spent four seasons as CSN's Flyers reporter.
NEWS
October 27, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Police yesterday met with Fox 29 reporter Claudia Gomez and a criminal-defense attorney representing her regarding alleged removal of ID cards belonging to Jean McIntosh from the Tacony house where McIntosh lived, Philly.com reported. Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey wants a grand jury to look into the alleged incident, the website's "The Gossip with Marnie Hall" said. Meanwhile, CBS 3 reported last night that cops are looking into the possibility that Linda Ann Weston might be linked to the 2005 death of a woman in Castor Gardens.
NEWS
February 15, 2000 | ELWOOD P. SMITH/ DAILY NEWS
Daily News staffer Julie Knipe Brown was honored last night by the Philadelphia Firefighters Union, Local 22, for her series of stories on hepatitis-C. With Brown are union president George Casey (left) and vice president Tom O'Drain.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gaeton Fonzi, 76, an investigative reporter for Philadelphia Magazine from 1959 to 1972 who later published his own conspiracy theory of the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, died Thursday, Aug. 30, of Parkinson's disease at his home in Satellite Beach, Fla. "He was relentless," D. Herbert Lipson, chairman of Metrocorp, owner of Philadelphia and Boston Magazines, recalled. That intensity carried on after Mr. Fonzi left Philadelphia. "His whole obsession was the Kennedy assassination," Marie, his wife of 55 years, said.
NEWS
January 1, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert A. Thomas, 75, a trailblazing reporter with The Philadelphia Inquirer who went on to a career in the foreign service, died of heart failure Dec. 21 at his home in Folsom, Calif. In 1952, Mr. Thomas joined the staff of The Inquirer as a copyboy. Two years later, he wrote a story about a black street gang and was promoted to staff reporter. "He was the first black reporter to work at The Inquirer," said Inquirer Associate Editor and columnist Acel Moore, who joined the paper in 1962.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | Letters to the Daily News Editor
I GUESS THE LIBERAL press will be building it own "wailing wall" because of one reporter asking President Obama a question. All the reporters there chased him down to the Washington Monument, like the villagers going after Frankenstein's monster. I suppose they forgot how they hounded Richard Nixon, or Sam Donaldson yelling questions at Ronald Reagan, probably even as he was trying to go to the bathroom. They say Richard Nixon broke the law, but not as much as Obama has tried to destroy our Constitution.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
A reporter for the liberal online news service OpEdNews filed suit Thursday in U.S. District Court alleging that Philadelphia police improperly targeted her for arrest during a demonstration against military recruiting at Franklin Mills Mall in 2009. The demonstration attracted counter-demonstrators, and the two groups were monitored by the Philadelphia Police Department's Civil Affairs Unit. Photographer and writer Cheryl Biren-Wright said she was taking photographs for the news service when police singled her out from among other media representatives, seized her camera, and placed her under arrest.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doris B. Wiley, 91, a Philadelphia newspaper reporter for more than 40 years who covered hard news with the best of them, "interviewed" Morris the cat of 9Lives cat food fame, and parachuted from a plane to write about a New Jersey flight school, died of pancreatic cancer Monday at Paoli Hospital. She was a longtime resident of Rosemont. Born in 1916, the former Doris Boyer was the daughter of Mabel and Carl Boyer - he was director of the Wagner Free Institute of Science in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 16, 2013
Murrey Marder, 93, a Washington Post reporter whose tenacious coverage of Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist crusade foreshadowed the senator's downfall and disgrace, died March 11 at the Washington Home hospice. The cause was complications from a stroke last month, said his nephew Steve Marder. Mr. Marder's career spanned nearly eight decades, including World War II service in the South Pacific as a Marine Corps combat correspondent. He joined the Washington Post in 1946 and distinguished himself on the so-called Red Beat, the sensational trials and hearings about the alleged communist infiltration of government, Hollywood, and other industries.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
William J. "Bill" Storm, perhaps the greatest "house-end" reporter who ever worked in Philadelphia, died Saturday of a stroke. He was 76 and lived in Roxborough and in Daytona, Fla. Bill Storm, a police reporter for 36 years for the old Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, was a maestro of the "house-ender. " That is a reporter knocking on the door of a grief-stricken family to get facts that puts faces and feelings into a story about tragedy. He was aggressive, smart and fast, but didn't fit the public's stereotype of the probing reporter - he was a gentleman.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Michael Matza, Staff Writer
If you see something, say something. It is a dictum for terrorizing times, and as the carnage mounts, law enforcement is more urgently pressing the public to turn tipster. But what, exactly, does something mean? That depends. "If I have a friend who all of a sudden starts going to the masjid [mosque] five times a day, is that a sign of radicalization - or of admirable devotion?" said Quasier Abdullah, assistant imam at Quba Institute, a school and mosque in West Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 18, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
The primary author of a national report that calls for a crackdown on low-performing cyber charter schools said Thursday that the goal was to spur conversation. It did. Hours after the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools released the report, critics of online charter schools said they welcomed its findings and recommendations. Companies that manage online schools and some charter advocates dismissed the study and questioned the research on which it was based. Susan DeJarnett, a Temple University law professor who has been researching and writing about problems with Pennsylvania's cyber charter schools for years, said she was intrigued by many points in the report.
SPORTS
June 16, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, Staff Writer
AT THIS POINT, with a little more than a week to go until the 76ers make the first pick in the NBA draft, it really seems as if it is a two-horse race as to whom the selection will be - LSU's Ben Simmons or Duke's Brandon Ingram. We gave our scouting report on Simmons last week and stand by our thought that he most likely will be the choice next Thursday. But if it's not Simmons, and the team doesn't trade the pick, it will most likely be Ingram. Today, we take a look at Ingram, a 6-10, 196-pound 18-year-old with a 7-3 wingspan who earned the ACC Rookie of the Year award after averaging 17.3 points and 6.8 rebounds for the Blue Devils.
NEWS
June 16, 2016 | By Mike Newall, Columnist
ORLANDO - From the moment massacres like the one Sunday morning at Pulse occur, we try to decipher what lay in the heart of the murderers who commit them. We search for motive because motive helps fit these tragedies into categories. We think we can understand them if we can check the right box. Which particular warped worldview did our latest mass killer subscribe to? Sometimes it's clear. Most of the time it's not. Sometimes you get a case like this one, which lies at the very intersection of many of our country's darkest ills.
NEWS
June 13, 2016
Jack Bausman, 92, a Cold War-era correspondent and former Moscow bureau chief for the Associated Press, died Thursday at a hospital in Stamford, Conn., his daughter, Mary-Fred Bausman-Watkins, said. He had heart surgery in April and never fully recovered, she said. Mr. Bausman arrived in Moscow as the news agency's bureau chief in July 1968, about a month before the Soviet Union invaded Czechoslovakia. He also reported from Frankfurt, Germany, from Warsaw, Poland, and from Budapest, Hungary, during a four-decade career with the AP, including his four years in Moscow.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
A Telemundo 62 news reporter was punched, slapped, and pulled to the ground this week while doing a live shot in front of City Hall. Iris Delgado was wrapping up her report on the soda tax proposal at 11:03 p.m. Wednesday when a woman in a green T-shirt tried to interrupt. "Excuse me, excuse me," the woman told Delgado, who appeared to ignore the looming presence to her right. When Delgado finished her presentation, the woman without warning slapped the back of the reporter's head and followed it up with a right to her face, and just as quickly began pulling Delgado's hair to drive her to the ground.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Responding to years of complaints over customer service and billing practices by cable and satellite-TV companies, the U.S. Senate Permanent Subcommittee is poised to release its findings from a year-long probe into the industry, Sen. Claire McCaskill (D., Mo.) and Sen. Rob Portman (R., Ohio) announced on Thursday. The subcommittee - which also has investigated human trafficking and a U.S.-funded counternarcotics program in Afghanistan - subpoenaed documents from pay-TV companies and solicited comments on customer experiences.
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
Scrutiny of the engineer who operated a train that derailed in Philadelphia last year, killing eight passengers, isn't over yet. On Wednesday, the National Transportation Safety Board plans to issue its final report about the May 12, 2015, derailment, and is expected to reiterate its conclusion that engineer Brandon Bostian lost "situational awareness" and accelerated to 106 mph heading into the Frankford Curve, where the speed limit is 50 mph. ...
REAL_ESTATE
June 5, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
On the bookcase in my younger son's bedroom sits a pile of earbuds that would take probably a day or more to unravel to make them usable. What do I need with 20 earbuds, right? Such a task is analogous to writing about the residential real estate market, especially since the housing bubble burst in 2006-2007. Today's example: A report by the Mortgage Bankers Association of America on the reasons why there is what the group calls "an affordability crisis" in rental housing. "Demand for rental housing has greatly outstripped supply, rapidly pushing vacancies down and rents up even as incomes fell," said Lynn Fisher, the group's vice president for research and economics.
SPORTS
June 5, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
Triple-A Lehigh Valley Alec Asher looked to be pushing for a promotion to the majors until he was hit in the leg on May 17 by a ground ball. The righthander is now in Clearwater, Fla., after his shin contusion became a shin fracture that will keep him out for about a month. The 24-year-old had a 1.53 ERA in four starts with the IronPigs. . . . Mario Hollands was optioned to the IronPigs on Thursday after completing a rehab assignment. The lefthanded reliever is working his way back from Tommy John surgery.
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