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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
August 31, 2010 | Daily News Staff Report
Lisa Hillary has joined Comcast SportsNet Philadelphia as the Flyers reporter. She replaces John Boruk, who has becomes a full-time anchor and reporter. Hillary spent three seasons as CSN Mid-Atlantic's Capitals reporter. She previously worked as a reporter and anchor with several major television outlets in Canada, where she spent time covering the NHL for two national sports networks, The Sports Network (TSN) and The Score. Boruk spent four seasons as CSN's Flyers reporter.
NEWS
October 27, 2011
PHILADELPHIA Police yesterday met with Fox 29 reporter Claudia Gomez and a criminal-defense attorney representing her regarding alleged removal of ID cards belonging to Jean McIntosh from the Tacony house where McIntosh lived, Philly.com reported. Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey wants a grand jury to look into the alleged incident, the website's "The Gossip with Marnie Hall" said. Meanwhile, CBS 3 reported last night that cops are looking into the possibility that Linda Ann Weston might be linked to the 2005 death of a woman in Castor Gardens.
NEWS
February 15, 2000 | ELWOOD P. SMITH/ DAILY NEWS
Daily News staffer Julie Knipe Brown was honored last night by the Philadelphia Firefighters Union, Local 22, for her series of stories on hepatitis-C. With Brown are union president George Casey (left) and vice president Tom O'Drain.
NEWS
January 1, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert A. Thomas, 75, a trailblazing reporter with The Philadelphia Inquirer who went on to a career in the foreign service, died of heart failure Dec. 21 at his home in Folsom, Calif. In 1952, Mr. Thomas joined the staff of The Inquirer as a copyboy. Two years later, he wrote a story about a black street gang and was promoted to staff reporter. "He was the first black reporter to work at The Inquirer," said Inquirer Associate Editor and columnist Acel Moore, who joined the paper in 1962.
NEWS
September 3, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gaeton Fonzi, 76, an investigative reporter for Philadelphia Magazine from 1959 to 1972 who later published his own conspiracy theory of the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy, died Thursday, Aug. 30, of Parkinson's disease at his home in Satellite Beach, Fla. "He was relentless," D. Herbert Lipson, chairman of Metrocorp, owner of Philadelphia and Boston Magazines, recalled. That intensity carried on after Mr. Fonzi left Philadelphia. "His whole obsession was the Kennedy assassination," Marie, his wife of 55 years, said.
NEWS
June 21, 2012 | Letters to the Daily News Editor
I GUESS THE LIBERAL press will be building it own "wailing wall" because of one reporter asking President Obama a question. All the reporters there chased him down to the Washington Monument, like the villagers going after Frankenstein's monster. I suppose they forgot how they hounded Richard Nixon, or Sam Donaldson yelling questions at Ronald Reagan, probably even as he was trying to go to the bathroom. They say Richard Nixon broke the law, but not as much as Obama has tried to destroy our Constitution.
NEWS
September 9, 2011
A reporter for the liberal online news service OpEdNews filed suit Thursday in U.S. District Court alleging that Philadelphia police improperly targeted her for arrest during a demonstration against military recruiting at Franklin Mills Mall in 2009. The demonstration attracted counter-demonstrators, and the two groups were monitored by the Philadelphia Police Department's Civil Affairs Unit. Photographer and writer Cheryl Biren-Wright said she was taking photographs for the news service when police singled her out from among other media representatives, seized her camera, and placed her under arrest.
NEWS
September 20, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Doris B. Wiley, 91, a Philadelphia newspaper reporter for more than 40 years who covered hard news with the best of them, "interviewed" Morris the cat of 9Lives cat food fame, and parachuted from a plane to write about a New Jersey flight school, died of pancreatic cancer Monday at Paoli Hospital. She was a longtime resident of Rosemont. Born in 1916, the former Doris Boyer was the daughter of Mabel and Carl Boyer - he was director of the Wagner Free Institute of Science in Philadelphia.
NEWS
March 16, 2013
Murrey Marder, 93, a Washington Post reporter whose tenacious coverage of Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist crusade foreshadowed the senator's downfall and disgrace, died March 11 at the Washington Home hospice. The cause was complications from a stroke last month, said his nephew Steve Marder. Mr. Marder's career spanned nearly eight decades, including World War II service in the South Pacific as a Marine Corps combat correspondent. He joined the Washington Post in 1946 and distinguished himself on the so-called Red Beat, the sensational trials and hearings about the alleged communist infiltration of government, Hollywood, and other industries.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
THE LIFE of a reporter can be pretty tough sometimes. For example, you try taking notes while participating in a swim meet. KYW Newsradio's Jim Melwert knows how hard it is firsthand. Last week, with a little help from the Gift of Life program, Melwert was in Houston reporting on and participating in the Transplant Games of America, an Olympics-style event for people who have donated or received an organ. In 2006, Melwert stepped in to give his aunt Jean DelMuto , who had polycystic kidney disease, one of his kidneys.
NEWS
July 19, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A report on a proposed $1.6 billion South Jersey light-rail line has been delayed by extended studies of historical resources and threatened and endangered species along the planned route. The proposed 18-mile-long Glassboro-Camden Line would restore passenger service to a corridor now used only by freight trains. A "draft environmental impact statement" on the effects of construction and operation of the rail line was supposed to be published in June, as a required step in the process of getting federal and state approvals for building it. The $8.1 million environmental assessment is to examine effects of noise and vibration, air pollution, social and economic changes, and historic-preservation efforts.
NEWS
July 18, 2014 | By Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writer
  The president of the Philadelphia lodge of the Fraternal Order of Police assailed the Philadelphia Daily News on Wednesday, saying there were credible allegations that two of the newspaper's reporters paid for utility bills, food, diapers, and other gifts to a woman whose story was told in their Pulitzer Prize-winning series on police misconduct. In an interview later in the day, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey raised similar criticisms of the reporters, saying that if the allegations were true, the reporters crossed an ethical line.
SPORTS
July 17, 2014 | DAILY NEWS STAFF
VILLANOVA OFFICIALS last night could not confirm details in a release from the University of Michigan that the Wildcats and Wolverines would meet in the Legends Classic at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Nov. 25. Although the 'Cats are scheduled to play in the event, a Villanova spokesperson said last evening that athletic department officials were unaware that any pairings had been set. Villanova, Michigan, Virginia Commonwealth and Oregon...
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Inspectors surveying Philadelphia's Veterans Affairs benefits center in June found two stunning signs of disarray: mail bins brimming with claims dating to 2011 and other benefits that had been paid twice. More alarming, the team from the VA Office of Inspector General found evidence that staff tasked with managing pensions for the eastern United States were manipulating dates to make old claims appear new, according to a report obtained by The Inquirer. The findings are the first clear evidence that the city's VA system is not immune from controversies that have plagued other centers and sparked a growing scandal over delayed care and services affecting veterans nationwide.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former director of a now-defunct West Chester charter school is being investigated for theft after an employee reported finding scores of questionable transfers in the school's bank accounts, court documents show. LaMont McKim, who in 2005 founded Sankofa Academy Charter School with his wife, had sole control of finances at the grades 5-12 institution, a board member told borough police. Police executed a warrant last week to seize the school's financial records. McKim does not have a publicly listed phone number and could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
July 12, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Rutgers University professor who has twice attempted to run for president of Iran says he is disappointed, but not angry or surprised, that the United States reportedly has monitored his e-mail. The online news outlet the Intercept reported Wednesday that e-mail addresses linked to Hooshang Amirahmadi, along with four other prominent Muslim Americans, appeared on a list of more than 7,000 monitored by the FBI and National Security Agency beginning between 2002 and 2008. It remains unclear whether monitoring continues.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The homeownership rate in Philadelphia declined sharply between 2000 and 2012, primarily as a consequence of the prolonged and sweeping real estate downturn that followed the bursting of the housing bubble in 2006-07, according to a study released Wednesday by the Pew Charitable Trusts. Although Philadelphia's homeownership rate remains high among the nation's 30 largest cities, the 7.1 percentage-point drop in owner-occupied units - from 59.3 percent to 52.2 percent, or by 47,082 - was surpassed only by Phoenix, which suffered record foreclosures and price declines when the market swooned, the Pew study shows.
NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
SOME OF Philadelphia's charter schools have taken heed of recommendations put forth in a stinging 2010 controller's report and, according to a follow-up report, have been able to improve their governance practices. Harambee Institute of Science and Technology Charter School in West Philadelphia, for example, had a few irregular practices that have been resolved since the 2010 report. The school was once home to Club Damani, a dance venue that served alcoholic beverages, and had a chief financial officer, Rhonda Sharif, who collected salaries from various schools, all of whom contributed to her pension.
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