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Reproductive Health

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NEWS
July 6, 1989 | SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
Pro-life demonstrators sing and pray in the rain yesterday morning outside the Northeast Women's Center on Comly Road in Northeast Philadelphia. Their protest closed the clinic for a while until they were threatened with arrest and dispersed. Some then joined a demonstration at the Reproductive Health and Counseling Center in Chester, where nearly 100 people were arrested. The protests came two days after the Supreme Court ruling that permits tighter restrictions on abortion.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Kathryn Kolbert argued Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the 1992 Supreme Court case that has been widely credited with saving Roe v. Wade In 1973 and the first years after the Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade , abortion was legal, accessible in most states, and low-income women could pay for it with Medicaid. Today, there are more than 1,000 laws against abortion on the books nationwide and federal laws ban Medicaid and federal insurance or health plans from paying for it, affecting low-income Americans, government workers, and members of the military.
NEWS
January 22, 2012 | By Dayle Steinberg
Jan. 22 marks the 39th anniversary of the landmark Roe v. Wade decision. This Supreme Court ruling guaranteed that the constitutional right to privacy encompasses a woman's right to choose whether to continue a pregnancy to term. The decision is one of the most emotional and difficult a woman will ever make, and she must be free to decide. Yet, today, lawmakers across the country remain committed to denying women that right by rolling back the only law that keeps abortion care safe and legal.
NEWS
December 3, 2004
IN HER LATEST op-ed piece for the Daily News, Christine Flowers is dead wrong in belittling the possible reversal of Roe v. Wade. "If I don't get my way, I'll die" is not melodramatic hyperbole from the abortion-rights movement. If Roe is reversed, women - and in particular poor women - will again be forced by circumstance to seek illegal back-alley abortions. According to the World Health Organization, illegal abortions are a leading cause of death for women, especially in developing nations.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The federal government almost shut down Friday, not over fiscal policy but over concerns of taxpayers funding abortion. We don't. "If you want an abortion, you go to Planned Parenthood, and that's well over 90 percent of what Planned Parenthood does," said Republican Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona. Well, no. Abortion constitutes 3 percent of what Planned Parenthood does. More than 90 percent of the organization's services, 96 percent if you prefer specifics - Kyl, apparently, does not - are for contraception, cancer screening, detection and treatment of sexually transmitted disease, and other health issues.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | By Fawn Vrazo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women who come to Hahnemann University's new Sports Gynecology and Women's Life Cycle Center may not be sure if they have entered a doctor's office, or a gym. The center will have the usual gynecological trappings: weight scales, speculums and examination tables with foot stirrups. But one separate small room will be furnished with a weight-lifting machine, a treadmill, an exercycle, some barbells. During her visit, a patient might find herself working out on a rowing machine. The center, which will be fully operational in the next three to four months, is the creation of Mona Shangold, Hahnemann's new director of reproductive endocrinology.
LIVING
October 12, 1998 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After years of conflicting studies and controversies about whether human sperm counts are falling, a Scottish infertility expert says the bottom line is men are probably as fertile as ever. "There is as yet no evidence for any adverse change in male fertility," D. Stewart Irvine of the Center for Reproductive Biology in Edinburgh said last week. But Stewart's presentation at the annual meeting of the International Federation of Infertility Societies and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine in San Francisco was far from reassuring.
NEWS
April 30, 2002 | By Csar Chelala
The Bush administration's recent decision to cut funds appropriated by Congress to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) will seriously hurt that agency's support for reproductive health in developing countries. UNFPA is accused of condoning forced abortions in China, and of making abortion in general part of its policy. This accusation came originally from the Population Research Institute, an anti-abortion group with branches worldwide. PRI officials indicated that American funds were being used "illegally" by UNFPA to pay for coercive practices in China.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
A way to protect mother and child The column "Why Roe is the keystone of rights" (Sunday) brought up many good points for people of conscience to consider. Questions about prenatal care, early-childhood development, and the need to provide support for pregnant women and newborns all need to be raised. I was reminded of different questions raised by the late Gov. Robert P. Casey, in his 1996 autobiography, Fighting for Life , which tells the story of the double transplant he underwent, as well as his advocacy for the unborn.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | By Joan S. Coombs
In October, Congress recognized that our friends in developing countries need help. Faced with millions of unintended pregnancies and abortions, thousands of deaths because of AIDS, thousands of pregnancy related illnesses and horribly unsafe abortion practices, Congress and President Clinton negotiated a bill that offered a small amount for family planning services in these countries. Please do not confuse family planning with abortion; U.S. law prohibits spending these funds on abortion.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Kathryn Kolbert argued Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the 1992 Supreme Court case that has been widely credited with saving Roe v. Wade In 1973 and the first years after the Supreme Court decided Roe v. Wade , abortion was legal, accessible in most states, and low-income women could pay for it with Medicaid. Today, there are more than 1,000 laws against abortion on the books nationwide and federal laws ban Medicaid and federal insurance or health plans from paying for it, affecting low-income Americans, government workers, and members of the military.
NEWS
February 20, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Melissa Weiler Gerber became executive director of the Family Planning Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania in 2010, she called it "a challenging time. " The nonprofit council - which administers public funding for reproductive health services in the region - was operating in the red. Nationally, family planning funding was under renewed political attack. And Gerber, 45, was following a tough act: Dorothy Mann, 71, known during her 33-year tenure for her vision and brash style.
NEWS
January 25, 2013
A way to protect mother and child The column "Why Roe is the keystone of rights" (Sunday) brought up many good points for people of conscience to consider. Questions about prenatal care, early-childhood development, and the need to provide support for pregnant women and newborns all need to be raised. I was reminded of different questions raised by the late Gov. Robert P. Casey, in his 1996 autobiography, Fighting for Life , which tells the story of the double transplant he underwent, as well as his advocacy for the unborn.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
Oh, my. Here we are in 2012 and talking about the role(s) of women, equal pay and opportunities, coverage for reproductive health, and #bindersfullofwomen, though, really, that meme is the least of our problems. Let's start with some good news: The second debate was watched by 65.5 million viewers, half the number of Americans who voted in 2008, which demonstrates a pretty engaged electorate (or one that will watch if nothing else is on television). The candidates discussed issues of importance to residents of cities and suburbs, not merely the problems of small-town folks in a John Mellencamp song.
NEWS
July 8, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
To allay community concerns that religious rules would trump patients' rights, Abington Health on Friday issued a statement promising that it would continue all reproductive health services except abortion after partnering with Holy Redeemer Health System. Abington chief executive Laurence M. Merlis has been barraged by vitriolic e-mails, letters, and Facebook posts from clergy, women's groups, professional organizations, and residents since last week, when he announced that in deference to Catholic moral teachings, abortions would no longer be provided at Abington.
NEWS
July 7, 2012 | By Marie McCullough, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To allay community concerns that religious rules would trump patients' rights, Abington Health on Friday issued a statement promising that it would continue all reproductive health services except abortion after partnering with Holy Redeemer Health System. Abington chief executive Laurence M. Merlis has been barraged by vitriolic e-mails, letters, and Facebook posts from clergy, women's groups, professional organizations, and residents since last week, when he announced that in deference to Catholic moral teachings, abortions would no longer be provided at Abington.
NEWS
June 21, 2012
An obituary Wednesday for former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Kevin Tucker wrongly described a part of his background. Mr. Tucker worked as a Rahway, N.J., police officer while in college. Also, the family has suggested contributions to the Albert R. Taxin Brain Tumor Research Center of the Wistar Institute, 3601 Spruce St., Suite 242, Philadelphia 19104. The director of the institute is Dr. Russel E. Kaufman. A story Wednesday about a bill to transfer oversight of church-based day-care facilities from the Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare to the Department of Education misstated the response of DPW spokesperson Cary Miller when asked about Gov. Corbett's position on the legislation.
NEWS
June 4, 2012 | Inquirer Editorial
Republicans in Harrisburg have launched another misguided attack on women's reproductive health care with a bill to defund Planned Parenthood in Pennsylvania.   Legislation introduced by a small band of GOP lawmakers would bar all federal and state funding to Planned Parenthood. The bill's chief sponsor, Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R., Butler), claims overall public funding for women's health services would not be reduced, but that the bill would prioritize funding so that hospitals, health centers, and other clinics would receive money first.
NEWS
May 24, 2012 | By Karen Heller, Inquirer Columnist
The Women's Law Project just released a massive, two-year study, "Through the Lens of Equality," examining the role gender bias plays in the physical, emotional, and financial health of Pennsylvania women. The diagnosis? Not so good. Actually, the report states, "the health consequences of inequality truly shocked us. " Really, can we be shocked about gender inequality in a commonwealth whose governor, in defending a bill requiring an ultrasound prior to an abortion (plus two souvenir photos)
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | Michele Vaughn
Michele Vaughn is chair of the Chester County Democratic Committee Women are under attack in Pennsylvania. At a time when our governor and our legislature should be fixing unemployment, improving education, and repairing our crumbling infrastructure, they have instead focused their political and personal agenda on attacking women's rights. House Bill 1077, which is intended to humiliate, intimidate, and punish women who seek abortions, is one of the most reprehensible pieces of legislation Harrisburg has ever produced.
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