CollectionsReproductive Rights
IN THE NEWS

Reproductive Rights

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 21, 1998 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sally Thacker McCormick, 69, of Yardley, a retired education director for a social service agency and an active volunteer for reproductive rights, died Tuesday at St. Mary Medical Center in Middletown Township, Bucks County, after a battle against breast cancer. A native of Dayton, Ohio, she was raised in Pasadena, Calif., where she was educated. She graduated from Smith College and got married in 1951. When she and her family moved to Bucks County from Florida in 1967, she became an active volunteer for the Planned Parenthood Association of Bucks County.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
NOTED FEMINIST Gloria Steinem took the podium at the National Constitution Center on Tuesday night, addressing a crowd of 500 spanning four generations at Planned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania's annual Spring Gathering. Steinem's talk came at a time when illegal-abortion doc Kermit Gosnell's trial is highlighting the uglier side of the abortion issue in Philadelphia, and as state legislators are considering measures to limit abortion access under future government-funded health-insurance plans.
NEWS
February 4, 2002
Last week, a new chapter in the war was announced - not by President Bush, but by Tommy Thompson, secretary of Health and Human Services. Not the war in Afghanistan, but the domestic war over women's reproductive rights. Thompson announced that the Bush administration is changing the word fetus to "unborn child" so that low-income pregnant women can be eligible for prenatal care under CHIP, the Children's Health Insurance Program that benefits poor children. While we support extending health coverage to low-income pregnant women, this is a stunningly blatant attempt to ultimately criminalize abortion by attempting to confer rights to a fetus, which contradicts the Supreme Court's intent its original Roe v. Wade decision.
NEWS
September 27, 2004
W IS FOR WOMEN, indeed. That may be what the campaign slogan says, but President George W. Bush certainly isn't for women exercising their rights to make their own medical decisions. From his very first business day in office, Bush made it clear that his moderate pose on reproductive rights during the 2000 campaign was a ruse. On Jan. 22, 2001, Bush reinstalled the "global gag rule," which denies U.S. aid to family planning programs abroad that, using their own funds, provide abortions, counseling or advocate for changes in abortion laws.
NEWS
January 20, 2006
WITH ALL DUE respect to Mr. Alito, his past opinions on a wide range of issues - ranging from reproductive rights to the limits of presidential power - are alarming. Even more alarming is the fact that he stonewalled the Senate, refusing to answer legitimate questions that would have elucidated his current positions. With a White House running roughshod over civil rights and abusing the power of the executive branch, we cannot afford to have a Supreme Court justice who has shown so little regard for individual rights and separation of powers.
NEWS
April 8, 2005
WHAT SUPPORTERS of reproductive rights need to remember is that with Republicans in charge of Congress and the White House, all reproductive choices are in jeopardy. Regaining control of the Senate means Democrats can stop extremist conservative activists from getting on the federal bench and ward off radical legislation without using the filibuster. A pro-choice Republican like Arlen Specter has no impact on his party's position on the issue. One or two anti-choice Democrats would have no net effect on the party position, but could allow the party to attract voters who agree on other issues but get hung up on the "choice thing.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | By Lem Lloyd, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Both are women. Both have taught at West Chester University and both consider themselves advocates for women's rights. That, however, is where the similarities end when comparing the two candidates running for the 156th Legislative District seat in eastern Chester County. Democratic challenger Robin Garrett, 43, is a teacher of nursing who says her top priority, if elected, will be to overhaul a state government system that she believes has lost touch with the people. Republican State Rep. Elinor Taylor, 71, is a 16-year veteran of that system, someone who prides herself on knowing how the game in Harrisburg works and who is not shy about using her seniority.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | Associated Press
PHOENIX - Arizona's ban on abortions starting at 20 weeks of pregnancy will take effect this week as scheduled after a federal judge ruled Monday that the new law is constitutional. U.S. District Judge James Teilborg said the statute may prompt a few pregnant women who are considering abortion to make the decision earlier. But he said the law is constitutional because it does not prohibit women from making the decision to end their pregnancies. He also wrote that the state had provided "substantial and well-documented" evidence that a fetus has the capacity to feel pain during an abortion by at least 20 weeks.
NEWS
July 27, 1998 | BY SARA ECKEL
When you write about reproductive rights in America, you're never short of material. A new state or federal restriction is always along to limit women's access to abortion. Just this month, for example, the House voted on a bill that restricts the rights of young women to get abortions and one that limits certain late-term abortions. We have been seeing such measures for years, and their sheer volume can make even the most ardent reproductive-rights supporter feel weary. For years we've been saying that conservatives are eroding the right to choose.
NEWS
November 24, 2004 | CAROL TOWARNICKY
EVEN NOW, with religious Rumpelstiltskins claiming their payback for spinning the Bush campaign into gold, some analysts say reproductive rights are safe. They claim Roe v. Wade will stand despite a hailstorm of pray-ins against Sen. Arlen Specter's suggestion that the Senate might actually fulfill its responsibility to "advise and consent" - and even when Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist threatens to "go nuclear" and eliminate the filibuster if Senate Democrats raise objections to judicial nominees.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 18, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
OK, WHO WAS Ebenezer Maxwell? Turns out he was a wealthy Philadelphia cloth merchant in the mid-19th century, but his main claim to local fame is the house he built in West Germantown for $10,000. The Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion is a remarkable masonry structure, 2 1/2 stories high with a three-story tower. It's on the National Register of Historic Places. Trouble is, hardly anybody visits it, although it's open to the public as a museum. And over the years, its very existence had been threatened by the nonprofit that manages it. A director once described Ebenezer Maxwell as a "nobody" and the museum as something nobody wanted.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
IN "THE EMPEROR'S New Clothes," a preening monarch is hoodwinked into believing that he's just bought a magnificent outfit when all he's been sold is a bill of (dry) goods. Prancing around in what he thinks is cloth of gold, the emperor is complimented by his obsequious subjects. They all would have lived happily ever after had a young boy not pointed his finger and said "he's naked!" I love that story for what it tells us about the human capacity for self-delusion. We often believe what our hearts suggest despite the clear and urgent message relayed by facts.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
NOW THAT THE legislation for further background checks for gun control has failed, where are we going? I think this proposal was just a smokescreen to make people think that something was actually going to happen. Expanded background checks are not the answer to controlling gun violence. What we really need are controls on semiautomatic weapons and high-capacity magazines. We should also have automatic jail sentences for those caught with an unregistered gun. If you want a licensed handgun in your home, that's certainly your right, and I have no objection.
NEWS
April 18, 2013 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
NOTED FEMINIST Gloria Steinem took the podium at the National Constitution Center on Tuesday night, addressing a crowd of 500 spanning four generations at Planned Parenthood Southeastern Pennsylvania's annual Spring Gathering. Steinem's talk came at a time when illegal-abortion doc Kermit Gosnell's trial is highlighting the uglier side of the abortion issue in Philadelphia, and as state legislators are considering measures to limit abortion access under future government-funded health-insurance plans.
NEWS
December 31, 2012
By Darryl Lorenzo Wellington Fifty years ago this month, the black gay novelist James Baldwin penned his powerful essay "A Letter to My Nephew. " In it, he wrote: "You were born into a society which spelled out with brutal clarity and in as many ways as possible that you were a worthless human being. " First published in the Progressive magazine and then reprinted in his book of essays The Fire Next Time , Baldwin's letter outlined what he called "the crux" of his dispute with America.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
RICHARD Mourdock, a conservative Republican who is favored to win a U.S. Senate seat in Indiana, pulled a Todd Akin on Monday night, pontificating that pregnancies from rape or incest are "something God intended" - and therefore the victims should not be able to obtain abortions. But this time, the reaction of the Republican Party establishment was quite different from the reaction to Missouri Senate candidate Todd Akin's assertion in August that, if a rape is "legitimate" (that is, the woman didn't secretly want it)
NEWS
October 8, 2012 | BY CAROL TRACY AND KATE MICHELMAN
AT A RECENT meeting a colleague of ours presented us with a challenge and posed the following questions: Imagine if every woman of voting age participated in this upcoming presidential election? How would that determine the outcome of the election and the legislation and policy coming out of Washington? What would happen - would anything really change? The implications of such a reality are staggering. For one, you would never hear any politician utter the phrase "legitimate rape" nor would a "transvaginal ultrasound" be prescribed by anyone other than a woman's doctor; equal pay for equal work would be obvious; our reproductive rights would be championed by politicians, not jeopardized; support for efforts to end violence against women would be expanded; Social Security and Medicare would be stabilized and strengthened, not privatized and minimized.
NEWS
July 31, 2012 | Associated Press
PHOENIX - Arizona's ban on abortions starting at 20 weeks of pregnancy will take effect this week as scheduled after a federal judge ruled Monday that the new law is constitutional. U.S. District Judge James Teilborg said the statute may prompt a few pregnant women who are considering abortion to make the decision earlier. But he said the law is constitutional because it does not prohibit women from making the decision to end their pregnancies. He also wrote that the state had provided "substantial and well-documented" evidence that a fetus has the capacity to feel pain during an abortion by at least 20 weeks.
NEWS
February 27, 2012
LAST WEDNESDAY, Virginia Gov. Bob O'Donnell backed off signing a law that would have required invasive, trans-vaginal ultrasounds for many women seeking abortions, but only after his state became a national laughingstock. Now Pennsylvania's state legislators apparently want to bask in ridicule and protest. A bill in the state House of Representatives, with 120 co-sponsors, would require any woman who wants an abortion to first get an ultrasound at her own expense. Some of the bill's supporters argue that H.B. 1077 doesn't specifically call for probes into private parts.
NEWS
September 15, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Volunteering was always a part of life for Babs Rhodes. Last year, she told Retirement Living magazine, "This is the way I pay back society," and, "it keeps me young. " Roslyn G. Babbit "Babs" Rhodes, 84, a retired apparel firm manager and community activist, died of kidney cancer Saturday, Sept. 4, at Attleboro Retirement Village in Langhorne. Before becoming ill last year, Mrs. Rhodes took the train to Philadelphia twice a week, on Wednesdays to prepare meals for Manna, which provides meals for those afflicted with HIV and AIDS, and on Thursdays to give tours of City Hall.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|