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Republican Guard

NEWS
February 28, 1991 | By Aaron Epstein, Andrew Maykuth and Robert S. Boyd, Inquirer Washington Bureau Owen Ullmann and R. A. Zaldivar of the Inquirer Washington Bureau contributed to this article, as did Tom Fiedler of the gulf staff
President Bush declared last night that "Kuwait is liberated" and announced a midnight halt to the war. "Iraq's army is defeated, our military objectives are met," said the President in a televised address to the nation and much of the world. He said that at midnight - just 100 hours after the ground war began and six weeks into Operation Desert Storm - "all United States and coalition forces will suspend offensive combat operations. " Bush warned that the war could resume if Iraqi troops fired on allied forces or if Iraq launched a single Scud missile attack on any country.
NEWS
February 27, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
More than 250 American tanks are locked in a "fierce battle" against 200 Republican Guard tanks west of the Iraqi military city of Basra as allied forces attempt to immobilize the remainder of Saddam Hussein's top-line force, a Pentagon source said today. "They're blocked, they can't get out," said the senior military official, who spoke on condition of anonymity. Two major U.S. Army units, the tank-heavy VII Corps and the 24th Infantry Division (Mechanized), were closing in on three Republican Guard infantry divisions and about one and a half armored divisions some 50 miles west of Basra, the official said.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
For weeks, the Pentagon told Americans that the air war in the Persian Gulf was inflicting heavy damage but would not preclude a long and bloody fight against a huge, resilient, formidable army. The architects of Operation Desert Storm were only half right, some military analysts and historians now believe. The air war has been the most successful in history. However, the United States may have overestimated the willingness of the Iraq army to fight. Together, those two factors help explain the allies' overwhelmingly swift and devastating thrust into Iraq and Kuwait, which apparently prompted an announcement this morning by Baghdad Radio ordering Iraqi troops to leave Kuwait.
NEWS
February 26, 1991 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Saddam Hussein's fiercely loyal and battle-hardened Republican Guard forces are the Iraqi leader's last and only hope to save himself and his government from an imminent and overwhelming military defeat, Pentagon officials say. Yesterday, allied troops were reported battling with several Republican Guard units in what could be the most crucial clashes of the Persian Gulf war. U.S. military spokesmen in Saudi Arabia said yesterday morning...
NEWS
February 21, 1991 | By Larry Copeland, Inquirer Gulf Staff The Associated Press and the Dallas Morning News contributed to this article
More than 450 Iraqi soldiers surprised U.S. troops by surrendering yesterday after four American helicopter gunships destroyed their bunkers. It was the largest surrender of prisoners to U.S. troops in the Persian Gulf war. The Americans had to send CH-47 Chinook transport helicopters with military police units to ferry the prisoners back to Saudi Arabia. In other fighting, one U.S. soldier was killed and seven others wounded in one of four clashes overnight. It was the 14th American combat death reported since fighting broke out Jan. 17. And allied pilots flew 900 sorties over Kuwait, more than on any other day since the war began.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By Juan O. Tamayo, Inquirer Gulf Staff
Everyone expects the invasion of Kuwait to come soon, but nobody is sure what form it will take. Some see tens of thousands of allied troops streaking to the attack. "You are going to see entire corps moving across the battlefield," predicted Col. Leroy R. Goff of the Army's Third Armored Division. "We haven't seen elements of that size moving since the North African campaign in World War II. " But this weekend U.S. Defense Secretary Dick Cheney seemed to raise a second possibility - a series of limited forays, designed not to overrun the Iraqi troops but to lure them out of their deep bunkers and into the bombsights of U.S. pilots.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Two weeks into the Persian Gulf war, the U.S. commander in Saudi Arabia proclaimed yesterday that the allies had gained air supremacy. In the most comprehensive public briefing to date, Army Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf detailed the punishing assault he said Iraq was taking as he showed reporters videotapes of successful bombing runs and aerial combat. But at the same time, Schwarzkopf warned that the Iraqi army remained a threat to allied forces, which he said now include more than 500,000 Americans.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | By Nolan Walters, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf's statement yesterday that allied forces had broken supply and communication lines between Iraq and its troops in southern Kuwait could signal the accomplishment of a significant part of the allies' strategy. By isolating Iraq's large army in Kuwait, the allies have hoped to make it lose the will to fight, or at least put up less resistance, should American and allied troops attack across the desert. But Schwarzkopf's single comment that "I think we've broken both" supply and communications lines leaves many questions, officials in and out of government warned.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | By Frank Greve, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A mile south of the Capitol, inside two vast and virtually windowless buildings, hundreds of American spies are watching Iraq like hawks. They work for the National Photo Interpretation Center, whose round-the- clock job is to retrieve and analyze hundreds of photos transmitted daily from U.S. imaging satellites. Seven of these satellites pass over Iraq, one about every two hours, at heights of 250 to 500 miles. The pictures they take of Iraqi targets are so sharp you could count the oranges on a tabletop.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long shadows of late afternoon cloaked the Iraqi soldier as he sidled up to a foreign visitor. "I have been 10 years in the army," he said. "It's not worth it - to die in Kuwait. " To die in Kuwait or flee Iraq? That weighed heavily on the mind of this soldier on leave from the front. For next he leaned close and whispered an urgent question, one that could earn him a quick date with a firing squad if overheard. Could he find a safe haven across the border in Tehran?
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