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NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITER
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump told a handful of African Americans in North Philadelphia on Friday that he is not a bigot, and blamed the media for portraying him that way, according to people who attended a private event. "He does not see himself as a racist and neither did the people around the table," said Renee Amoore, deputy chairwoman of the Pennsylvania GOP. Trump supporter James Jones, the Republican nominee for the Second Congressional District seat, said he was one of 12 to 14 African Americans at the luncheon at the View, a catering hall run by People for People, a nonprofit operated by Greater Exodus Baptist Church at Broad and Brown Streets.
BUSINESS
June 2, 1999 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A committee of 61 Republican leaders from around the nation will oversee the mounting of the presidential nominating convention in Philadelphia next year. Yesterday, Republican National Committee chairman Jim Nicholson, a Colorado builder, named most of the rank-and-file members of the committee on arrangements. The leaders had been appointed earlier this year. The committee will hold its first meeting in Philadelphia when the Republican National Committee gathers here for its annual summer meeting July 8 through 10. That's when "they'll get a chance to see why the site-selection committee was so impressed with Philadelphia," said Tim Fitzpatrick, spokesman for the GOP's convention staff in Philadelphia.
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
Call them the counter-conventions. When Republicans arrive at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland on Monday to nominate a presidential candidate, Democratic National Committee staffers will be setting up a temporary office less than a mile away. And when the Democrats arrive at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia next Monday to select their nominee, Republican National Committee staffers will be doing the same thing about a mile and a half away. Behind enemy lines, the parties will push forth for media interviews their members of Congress and other elected officials to rebut and attack whatever is being said at the opposition's convention.
NEWS
September 3, 2011 | By Paul Davenport, Associated Press
PHOENIX - Gov. Jan Brewer on Friday decided against moving up the state's presidential primary by nearly a month from its current Feb. 28 date, avoiding what could have been a high-profile spat in the Republican Party over the schedule of the 2012 White House election. The Republican governor said, however, that she still wanted to leave open the option of moving the primary to a date later than Jan. 31 but earlier than Feb. 28. She also said the state had been tentatively allotted a Republican presidential candidates' debate by the Republican National Committee.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | By Tom Infield, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
How did the Republican Party get the nickname GOP? On the approach of its 37th presidential nominating convention, the Republican National Committee dug into this question. The answer is: Not sure. Researchers found mentions of "grand old party" and "gallant old party" in newspapers of the 1870s and 1880s. The New York Herald used the abbreviation on Oct. 15, 1884. "Perhaps the use of 'the G.O.M.' for Britain's Prime Minister William E. Gladstone in 1882 as 'the Grand Old Man' stimulated the use of GOP in the United States soon after," the party says in its official summary of the derivation of the nickname.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
As Donald Trump plumbed new depths of self-destructive behavior over the past week, the Republican freak-out felt more intense than the nervous vapors that infect almost every campaign at some point. Serious people dusted off Rule 9, the procedures by which the GOP would replace a presidential nominee in the event he or she dies, becomes incapacitated - or quits. The most likely scenario: the 168 members of the Republican National Committee (a state chairman, national committeeman and national committeewoman from each state and territory)
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
Ohio Gov. John Kasich on Thursday declared Donald Trump unfit to be president and warned that if the New York real estate developer wins the Republican nomination, it would put at risk the reelection of Sen. Pat Toomey. Kasich, speaking before a fund-raiser at the Union League, said a recent string of intemperate comments by Trump had pushed him to take that stand. He had previously left the political bickering to Trump and Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas. "There are things that you just can't look away," Kasich said.
NEWS
August 17, 1992 | By Carl M. Cannon, INQUIRER CONVENTION BUREAU
Fearful that the coalition Ronald Reagan put together 12 years ago is coming apart, President Bush and the Republican National Committee went looking for some of that old Reagan magic - and decided to return to the source. Tonight, former President Reagan will take the convention podium amid high hopes he can energize a demoralized party. GOP officials say they expect Reagan to be his old self - the man who kindled modern conservatism on the night of Oct. 27, 1964, with a nomination speech for Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater.
NEWS
September 13, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
An outspoken feminist who has disagreed with President Reagan on abortion and the Equal Rights Amendment has his backing for a top Republican Party job. She's his daughter Maureen. Republican National Chairman Frank Fahrenkopf, saying he was acting at the President's request, yesterday endorsed Maureen Reagan as co-chair of the party. Fahrenkopf said Reagan backed his daughter for the party post on Wednesday during a meeting in the Oval Office. The post will be filled at the January meeting of the Republican National Committee in Washington.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Philip Elliott, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Reeling from back-to-back presidential losses and struggling to cope with the country's changing racial and ethnic makeup, the Republican National Committee plans to spend $10 million this year to send hundreds of party workers into Hispanic, black, and Asian communities to promote its brand among voters who overwhelmingly supported Democrats in 2012. RNC chairman Reince Priebus on Sunday also proposed shortening the presidential nominating calendar in 2016 and limiting the number of primary-season debates to avoid the self-inflicted damage from inside-party squabbling on the eventual nominee.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, STAFF WRITER
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump told a handful of African Americans in North Philadelphia on Friday that he is not a bigot, and blamed the media for portraying him that way, according to people who attended a private event. "He does not see himself as a racist and neither did the people around the table," said Renee Amoore, deputy chairwoman of the Pennsylvania GOP. Trump supporter James Jones, the Republican nominee for the Second Congressional District seat, said he was one of 12 to 14 African Americans at the luncheon at the View, a catering hall run by People for People, a nonprofit operated by Greater Exodus Baptist Church at Broad and Brown Streets.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, POLITICS WRITER
As Donald Trump plumbed new depths of self-destructive behavior over the past week, the Republican freak-out felt more intense than the nervous vapors that infect almost every campaign at some point. Serious people dusted off Rule 9, the procedures by which the GOP would replace a presidential nominee in the event he or she dies, becomes incapacitated - or quits. The most likely scenario: the 168 members of the Republican National Committee (a state chairman, national committeeman and national committeewoman from each state and territory)
NEWS
July 19, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Columnist
Call them the counter-conventions. When Republicans arrive at Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland on Monday to nominate a presidential candidate, Democratic National Committee staffers will be setting up a temporary office less than a mile away. And when the Democrats arrive at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia next Monday to select their nominee, Republican National Committee staffers will be doing the same thing about a mile and a half away. Behind enemy lines, the parties will push forth for media interviews their members of Congress and other elected officials to rebut and attack whatever is being said at the opposition's convention.
NEWS
June 24, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's conservative provocateur-in-chief, never at a loss for an irascible word, hates what he's hearing from his party's presumptive presidential nominee. Steve Lonegan, who often annoys fellow Republicans as much as Democrats, has lately and improbably become the loudest voice of the Dump Trump movement in the New Jersey GOP. Lonegan is pushing the cause through fiery takedowns of top Donald Trump loyalists, as on CNN recently, when he and Jeffrey Lord accused each other of running a political suicide mission.
NEWS
April 2, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Staff Writer
Ohio Gov. John Kasich on Thursday declared Donald Trump unfit to be president and warned that if the New York real estate developer wins the Republican nomination, it would put at risk the reelection of Sen. Pat Toomey. Kasich, speaking before a fund-raiser at the Union League, said a recent string of intemperate comments by Trump had pushed him to take that stand. He had previously left the political bickering to Trump and Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas. "There are things that you just can't look away," Kasich said.
NEWS
November 6, 2015 | Thomas Fitzgerald, Chris Palmer, and Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writers
Pennsylvania and New Jersey were blue anomalies on Tuesday night's electoral map, offering some victories for Democrats to celebrate amid the red of losses elsewhere in the country. The party took control of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, increased its dominance of once-Republican Montgomery County, and elected Jim Kenney mayor of Philadelphia with a historic 85 percent of the vote. And New Jersey Democrats swept to their biggest Assembly majority in nearly four decades, rebuking Republican Gov. Christie.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the army of 18 Democratic National Committee representatives arrive in Philadelphia Wednesday, they will be greeted with plenty of Philadelphia swag and treated to a tour of the city's most treasured sites. As the 2016 Democratic National Convention site-selection committee arrived to a red carpet in New York City Monday, Philadelphia operatives were putting final touches to their plan to woo the committee later this week. Members of the selection committee will receive their own Sixers, Eagles, Phillies, and Union jerseys with their last names printed on the back, according to Kevin Washo, who is involved in the planning.
NEWS
January 14, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democrats continued to ask Sunday whether Gov. Christie had more knowledge than he has let on of a plot by aides and appointees to jam traffic on the George Washington Bridge because Fort Lee's mayor failed to endorse him for reelection. Republicans defended the governor, though some of the party's leading 2016 presidential contenders declined to speculate about Christie, a potential opponent in the party's primary elections. Assemblyman John Wisniewski, the Democratic chair of the Transportation Committee leading the investigation into the closures, said on CBS's Face the Nation : "It strains credibility" that Christie's advisers who were involved in or aware of the situation did not let him know about it. Last week, Christie fired his deputy chief of staff, Bridget Anne Kelly, after documents emerged showing she had urged one of the governor's appointees at the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to cause traffic problems in Fort Lee. Christie also severed ties with his campaign manager, Bill Stepien, who also has been linked to the controversy.
NEWS
August 21, 2013 | By E. J. Dionne, For The Inquirer
"We are not a debating society. We are a political operation that needs to win. " Thus did Gov. Christie offer one of the most pregnant statements yet in the GOP argument over the party's future. I'd argue that these 15 words, spoken to a Republican National Committee meeting in Boston last week, raise more questions than they answer. Here are a few. How do you decide on a winning strategy without debating it first? What is wrong with debating differences on policy and philosophy?
NEWS
May 6, 2013 | Dan Balz, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - President Obama passed the 100-day mark of his second term facing questions about whether his political capital is already disappearing. Republicans took delight in his discomfort. But they have their own 100-day question to answer: What have they done since November to turn around their fortunes? The president has had a difficult spring. His gun legislation, though it mustered more than 50 votes, was blocked in the Senate. His advisers are more optimistic about immigration reform, but the measure still faces serious obstacles, especially in the House.
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