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Rescue Equipment

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NEWS
May 10, 1990 | By Deborah S. Weiner, Special to The Inquirer
Bryn Athyn's fire and ambulance squad will be getting new equipment, thanks to a $5,000 grant from the state. Fire and ambulance chief Scott Cooper told the Bryn Athyn Borough Council on Monday that the squad will buy oxygen equipment, emergency patient- extrication equipment, and protective helmets, coats and gloves for ambulance personnel. Cooper said that money for the state emergency medical services program is generated through a $10 fee added to all traffic citations in the state, and is distributed through the county to regional districts.
NEWS
August 6, 2003 | By TOM PELIKAN
WISSAHICKON Creek looks great, doesn't it? A nice, long stretch of seemingly clean water, deep enough to wade or even dive into, within a quick walk of so many homes and families and kids. People even fish for trout there. You'd think it's a perfect creek to cool off in the heat of a Philadelphia summer. Think again. One young lady has already lost her life in the Wissahickon this year. She wasn't attacked or playing carelessly. She was a 14-year-old girl who went for a dip, slipped, went under the water and didn't come up again.
NEWS
June 8, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
MARIYA PLEKAN tried to bottle her emotions as she went back in time, back to the suffocating grip of the brick-and-concrete tomb. She was trapped there in the darkness, under the unrecognizable remains of a Center City Salvation Army thrift shop, for nearly 13 hours on June 5, 2013. No one could see her. No one could hear her. Another person might have gone mad in the face of such terror. Plekan said she gulped down air through a small hole in the debris, waiting for the world above her to go quiet before she attempted to cry out for help.
NEWS
February 5, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George R. Gowen Jr., 76, a career Navy rigger who tinkered with and made improvements to rescue equipment, diving gear and parachutes, died of lung cancer Jan. 23 at his son Michael's home in Levittown. He lived in Northeast Philadelphia. Born and raised in Ridley Park, Mr. Gowen graduated from West Catholic High School in 1947. He joined the Marines that year, and went on to enlist in the Navy in 1949. During the next 19 years, Mr. Gowen was a parachutist, a master parachute rigger, a scuba diver, and an inventor of improved search-and-rescue equipment for downed pilots.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The city will spend $56 million more than it takes in this fiscal year, a financial report released yesterday by the Rendell administration projects. The city won't run a deficit, the report says, because the administration began with an $80 million surplus for the fiscal year that ended in June. The figures come from the city's Quarterly Managers Report, and Mayor Rendell said he wasn't surprised. "I said all through the campaign that it would be a mistake to think that (last year's)
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Two duck hunters from Northeast Philadelphia were rescued early yesterday from the Delaware River near Yardley after their boat capsized, leaving them stranded in the cold, swiftly moving current for more than an hour. William Donahue and Steven Ahmid, 57, were pulled from the water into boats operated by members of the West Trenton Volunteer Fire Company, after attempts to get them out by helicopter failed. The rescue occurred near the Interstate 95 bridge in Yardley. Both men were taken to Saint Mary Hospital in Langhorne.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
EVEN IF City Council were to provide the Fire Department with the money needed to end the controversial rotating "brownouts" of fire stations, the Nutter administration said it would still stand by the policy. During his budget presentation to Council yesterday, Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers was asked if given the $3.8 million the city says it saves from brownouts, which began in 2010, would he discontinue the policy? "If Council came up with $3.8 million to eliminate brownouts and I were allowed to?
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Frank May, 59, has served as the chief of Albion Volunteer Fire Company No. 1 for more than 20 years. But today could be his last on the job. That's because May and more than 20 other volunteer firefighters are threatening to quit, contending that the Winslow Township Fire Commission, which oversees the township's seven volunteer squads, plans to give away their new fire truck. The commission is expected to vote on the issue tonight. Fire Commissioner Anthony Sirolli denies that the fate of the truck, a new fire-rescue unit ordered by Albion but sought by other squads, is set. "The Albion people have jumped to conclusions," he said.
NEWS
October 22, 2001 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The volunteers of the Radnor Fire Company were roused from their sleep by a 3:30 a.m. fire on the Main Line yesterday. Went back home at 4:30. Returned to the firehouse at 6:15. Caught a commuter train to Center City at 7. And now, at 10 a.m., Gena Schlegel, 22, was lying flat on her back on the sidewalk across from the north side of City Hall. She was among 21 Radnor volunteer fire officers acting as victims of a simulated train wreck in the Center City Commuter Tunnel.
NEWS
August 22, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A helicopter hovering over a Potomac River channel plunged into the water yesterday, killing photographer William S. Weems and two others, but the pilot jumped out to safety just before impact, officials said. Authorities said the five-seat Bell Jet Ranger was hovering 200 feet above the water about 7:30 a.m. when it apparently lost power, then plunged into the channel about 100 yards from a busy waterfront area of seafood wholesalers and yacht slips. Killed were Weems, 44, and his friend Robert Joy, 45, both of Washington, and Victoria Hinkley, 24, of Alexandria, Va., a realty company secretary.
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NEWS
June 8, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
MARIYA PLEKAN tried to bottle her emotions as she went back in time, back to the suffocating grip of the brick-and-concrete tomb. She was trapped there in the darkness, under the unrecognizable remains of a Center City Salvation Army thrift shop, for nearly 13 hours on June 5, 2013. No one could see her. No one could hear her. Another person might have gone mad in the face of such terror. Plekan said she gulped down air through a small hole in the debris, waiting for the world above her to go quiet before she attempted to cry out for help.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | BY JAN RANSOM, Daily News Staff Writer ransomj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
EVEN IF City Council were to provide the Fire Department with the money needed to end the controversial rotating "brownouts" of fire stations, the Nutter administration said it would still stand by the policy. During his budget presentation to Council yesterday, Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers was asked if given the $3.8 million the city says it saves from brownouts, which began in 2010, would he discontinue the policy? "If Council came up with $3.8 million to eliminate brownouts and I were allowed to?
NEWS
February 5, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George R. Gowen Jr., 76, a career Navy rigger who tinkered with and made improvements to rescue equipment, diving gear and parachutes, died of lung cancer Jan. 23 at his son Michael's home in Levittown. He lived in Northeast Philadelphia. Born and raised in Ridley Park, Mr. Gowen graduated from West Catholic High School in 1947. He joined the Marines that year, and went on to enlist in the Navy in 1949. During the next 19 years, Mr. Gowen was a parachutist, a master parachute rigger, a scuba diver, and an inventor of improved search-and-rescue equipment for downed pilots.
NEWS
August 6, 2003 | By TOM PELIKAN
WISSAHICKON Creek looks great, doesn't it? A nice, long stretch of seemingly clean water, deep enough to wade or even dive into, within a quick walk of so many homes and families and kids. People even fish for trout there. You'd think it's a perfect creek to cool off in the heat of a Philadelphia summer. Think again. One young lady has already lost her life in the Wissahickon this year. She wasn't attacked or playing carelessly. She was a 14-year-old girl who went for a dip, slipped, went under the water and didn't come up again.
NEWS
September 2, 2002
What common experience did most people caught in the horror of Sept. 11 share - whether at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, or aboard a doomed jet crossing the skies of Pennsylvania? As a group, they shared this: They were at their places of work, or heading to work. Many who were destined to die that day - firefighters, police and other emergency staff - did so while "just doing their job," according to a tribute offered last week by the head of the United Auto Workers.
NEWS
October 22, 2001 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The volunteers of the Radnor Fire Company were roused from their sleep by a 3:30 a.m. fire on the Main Line yesterday. Went back home at 4:30. Returned to the firehouse at 6:15. Caught a commuter train to Center City at 7. And now, at 10 a.m., Gena Schlegel, 22, was lying flat on her back on the sidewalk across from the north side of City Hall. She was among 21 Radnor volunteer fire officers acting as victims of a simulated train wreck in the Center City Commuter Tunnel.
NEWS
May 6, 2001 | By Michelle Jeffery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
If last week's weather was any indication, summer will be making an early appearance and soon many people will take to the Schuylkill and other area waterways for fun. But it is already the busy season for local water-rescue squads and dive teams. "As soon as the [spring] rains stop, people want to take their canoes onto the river" even though high waters and a strong current are very dangerous, said Amy Barto, a dive lieutenant with the Friendship Fire Company Dive Rescue Unit in Phoenixville.
NEWS
June 30, 1998 | By Stephanie L. Arnold, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Frank May, 59, has served as the chief of Albion Volunteer Fire Company No. 1 for more than 20 years. But today could be his last on the job. That's because May and more than 20 other volunteer firefighters are threatening to quit, contending that the Winslow Township Fire Commission, which oversees the township's seven volunteer squads, plans to give away their new fire truck. The commission is expected to vote on the issue tonight. Fire Commissioner Anthony Sirolli denies that the fate of the truck, a new fire-rescue unit ordered by Albion but sought by other squads, is set. "The Albion people have jumped to conclusions," he said.
NEWS
November 22, 1995 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
The city will spend $56 million more than it takes in this fiscal year, a financial report released yesterday by the Rendell administration projects. The city won't run a deficit, the report says, because the administration began with an $80 million surplus for the fiscal year that ended in June. The figures come from the city's Quarterly Managers Report, and Mayor Rendell said he wasn't surprised. "I said all through the campaign that it would be a mistake to think that (last year's)
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | By Christine Bahls, Special to The Inquirer
Two duck hunters from Northeast Philadelphia were rescued early yesterday from the Delaware River near Yardley after their boat capsized, leaving them stranded in the cold, swiftly moving current for more than an hour. William Donahue and Steven Ahmid, 57, were pulled from the water into boats operated by members of the West Trenton Volunteer Fire Company, after attempts to get them out by helicopter failed. The rescue occurred near the Interstate 95 bridge in Yardley. Both men were taken to Saint Mary Hospital in Langhorne.
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