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NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
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NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline is partnering with a San Diego research institute to study brain function and treatments to potentially reverse or slow down neurodegeneration. The Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla and GlaxoSmithKline, which has operations in the Philadelphia area, will create a center on Sanford Burnham's campus with the goal of finding new medicines for diseases such as Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Under a three-year agreement, GSK will fund a research laboratory where scientists and staff from Sanford Burnham will work with GSK neuroscientists.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Billionaire tech guru Sean Parker on Wednesday announced a $250 million effort to accelerate development of revolutionary cancer technology by uniting the University of Pennsylvania and five other leading research centers. Each of the centers has received an initial $10 million to $15 million grant to team with the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Among its goals is sharing the kind of data and discoveries that normally are guarded closely as the bases for patents and profits.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Vickie and Jack Farber, longtime supporters of Thomas Jefferson University and Jefferson Health, are giving the Center City institution $20 million to expand the Vickie and Jack Farber Institute for Neuroscience. The institute, which was founded in 2002 with a $10 million lead gift from the Farber Family Foundation, will unite Jefferson's departments of neurology, neurosurgery, psychiatry, and neuroscience, said Robert Rosenwasser, president of the institute. "It breaks down the silos that exist in every university and every medical center," said Rosenwasser, who also is chair of neurological surgery at Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Philly should be throwing a parade for Scott Kesterson, or at least buying him a snort of his favorite bourbon, Michter's. It's not every day that a small business moves across the country to Philadelphia. Even more rare is when the owner of that business has no personal ties here. "I never thought I'd be a Northeast guy," said the native of southern Oregon. Research is what led Kesterson, 51, to relocate his Spatial Terra, a four-year-old company specializing in a complex blend of market research, risk-mitigation analysis, and consulting, from Portland - a city often associated with progressiveness - to Philadelphia - a city that consistently does not score well in national rankings of best places for small business.
REAL_ESTATE
March 28, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
I would be remiss if I didn't take some time to talk about the annual Better Homes and Gardens survey of consumers' attitudes about their homes. The results come from brand executive editor Jill Waage, who reports on the surveys at the National Association of Home Builders shows every January in places much warmer than Philadelphia. The latest research focused on the millennial generation and its preferences regarding customization and smart technology in home design. In October 2015, more than 1,600 U.S. female owners of single-family homes shared their thoughts on home-improvement spending, the importance of functional design, and value in home technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, STAFF WRITER
Temple University researchers used a gene-editing technique to remove HIV DNA from the type of human immune cells where the virus can maintain a simmering reservoir of infection. The experiment, building on the researchers' previous HIV gene-editing work, was conducted in T cells growing in lab dishes. Whether it works in actual patients remains to be seen. Still, the study bolsters the concept that HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, can be cured, not just controlled in a latent stage by antiviral drugs.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Stanley S. Spiegel was about to open his firm, his wife, Sheila, said, he decided to name it as an engineer might. The firm, Esscube Engineering, used his initials - SSS - and for folks like him, she said, "three means a cube. " And so, in naming the firm, as in other matters, "he thought everything in mathematical terms. " On Friday, March 4, Mr. Spiegel, 83, of Marlton, former president of the research firm, based in Haddonfield and then in Southampton, Bucks County, died of kidney failure at his home.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Research options for gifted students According to the letter, "Funds for charters" (Feb. 22), "Like regular school districts, charter schools have individualized education programs for gifted students . . . . " Charter schools are exempt from Pennsylvania's regulations for gifted education. While public school districts are required to identify and meet the needs of gifted students through Gifted Individualized Education Plans, charter and private schools may assist - or ignore - gifted students.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors alleged Wednesday that corrupt officials in the Chinese government financially supported and may have benefited from a scheme to steal trade secrets worth billions from a GlaxoSmithKline research facility in Montgomery County. But lawyers representing one of the five defendants accused of pilfering information from the British-based pharmaceutical giant's Upper Merion Township location called such claims a "fantastical assertion. " The dispute - which boiled over at a detention hearing in federal court in Philadelphia - struck at the heart of debate over the Justice Department's recent checkered history in prosecuting cases of alleged theft of trade secrets involving Chinese American scientists.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Wills Eye Hospital, which said last month that it is trying to raise $30 million for a new research and medical-care facility, on Monday announced the hiring of Leslie G. Hyman to spearhead the expansion of the hospital's research program. Hyman, currently a head of the epidemiology faculty and professor at Stony Brook University Medical Center in Stony Brook, New York, is scheduled to start at Wills this summer, Will said. In addition to the job at Wills, she will hold the Thomas D. Duane Endowed Chair in the Department of Ophthalmology at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and will become co-director of the Wills Vision Research Center at Jefferson.
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