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BUSINESS
January 22, 2016 | By Chris Mondics and Sam Wood, STAFF WRITERS
Two GlaxoSmithKline scientists and three others were charged by a federal grand jury in Philadelphia on Wednesday with conspiracy to steal promising cancer research secrets from the pharmaceutical giant and market them to companies in China backed by the Chinese government. U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said Yu Xue, 45, of Wayne; Tao Li, 42, and Yan Mei, 36, both of Nanjing China; Tian Xue, 45, of Charlotte, N.C.; and Lucy Xi, 38, of West Lake Village, Calif., were named in the indictment.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
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SPORTS
January 30, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
Matt Klentak, in his first winter at the head of a baseball operations department, wanted to learn how companies manage information. The 35-year-old Phillies general manager surveyed people in baseball, other sports, and some with zero connections to the game. How, he asked, do you implement analytics into decisions? Those talks led him to Andy Galdi, a 30-year-old Google employee who was hired Thursday as the Phillies' first-ever director of baseball research and development. "He's the perfect guy to help grow us forward in this area," Klentak said.
NEWS
January 30, 2016
By Mary Woolley and Robert L. Bixby In passing a spending bill for 2016, Congress seemed to acknowledge that medical research had been cut too deeply for over a decade and agreed to boost funding for it in the coming months. But without reforms to address the basic structural problems in the federal budget, downward pressures on research and other important national priorities can be expected to continue. Consider what's at stake: Cutting-edge immunotherapy work at Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center to help achieve the goals of the "moonshot" initiative to cure cancer.
NEWS
January 28, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
After four - failed - auditions for American Idol , Junhow Wei got the message that he probably wasn't going to be a pop star. But Wei, who is now on the verge of getting his Ph.D. in sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, has found a way to turn his rejection into something positive: a study on how Idol losers deal with bad news. Wei's own reaction the first time he was rejected - anger - was a common one, he said. But, like lots of others, he also decided to try again, a tack he considers more in line with the "meritocratic" ideal that hard work and talent can triumph over lousy odds.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2016 | By Chris Mondics and Sam Wood, STAFF WRITERS
Two GlaxoSmithKline scientists and three others were charged by a federal grand jury in Philadelphia on Wednesday with conspiracy to steal promising cancer research secrets from the pharmaceutical giant and market them to companies in China backed by the Chinese government. U.S. Attorney Zane David Memeger said Yu Xue, 45, of Wayne; Tao Li, 42, and Yan Mei, 36, both of Nanjing China; Tian Xue, 45, of Charlotte, N.C.; and Lucy Xi, 38, of West Lake Village, Calif., were named in the indictment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2016
Vice President Biden is scheduled to spend part of Friday afternoon at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center, the first stop on his quest for the United States to cure cancer. President Obama announced the new "Moon Shot" mission during his State of the Union address Tuesday night, comparing it with John F. Kennedy's 1961 declaration to Congress that the nation would land a man on the moon by the end of the decade.Biden's 3 p.m. visit includes a tour of laboratories and a roundtable discussion with researchers at the Smilow Center for Translational Research and the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, both 3400 Civic Center Blvd.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2016
Scholars, shareholders, the newly separated, and the long-frustrated have plenty to say about cuts to the central research and business units at DuPont Co. by new CEO Edward Breen . Some highlights: "DuPont struggled with return on R&D over the years," notes Ben duPont , a shareholder and past manager at the chemical giant that bears his ancestor's name. "For 40 years, like a drumbeat, every few years DuPont introduced a new blockbuster product - nylon, Teflon, Tyvek, Delrin, Kevlar, Lycra, Kapton, Neoprene, Mylar . " (They weren't all blockbusters; duPont still has a pair of Corfam shoes - the Edsel of leather.)
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A week after 22-year-old Nicholas Peter Zizzamia disappeared from his Cherry Hill home May 12, 1979, the body of a young man of similar build and appearance was found 580 miles away in a Richmond, Ind., motel room. The city's Palladium-Item newspaper reported that the man had apparently slashed his right wrist and bled to death watching TV. Authorities did not find a driver's license or other identification in the room, for which the deceased had anonymously paid $13.52 in cash the day before.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Solar panels accounted for one-third of all new electricity generation installed in the United States in 2014, up from just 10 percent two years earlier. With interest expected to keep rising, many research groups are on the hunt for ways to boost efficiency. Among them is a team at the University of Delaware, which is developing materials to harness portions of the sun's spectrum that in today's conventional solar panels are largely wasted. The key is a property of a panel's semiconductor material called the band gap, an electronic hurdle of sorts.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to a still-mysterious condition known as Castleman disease, David Fajgenbaum, a professor of hematology/oncology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, is more than an advocate or a physician/scientist: He is also a patient. Addressing a team of volunteers for the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), Fajgenbaum quickly details on a white board what is known about CD, a group of poorly understood inflammatory disorders that can vary from a single enlarged lymph node to life-threatening multiple organ failure.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Tuesday tapped a new state treasurer, filling one of several vacancies that opened in his cabinet after several officials left the administration in recent months. Ford M. Scudder, chief operating officer of Nashville-based Laffer Associates, will begin as treasurer next month, the governor's office said. He replaces Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff, who left in July. Scudder is also a senior research analyst at Laffer Investments, an investment management firm. The company's founder, Arthur Laffer, who also founded the economic research and consulting firm Laffer Associates, was a key economic adviser to President Ronald Reagan, and is often called the father of supply-side economics - a theory that elevates the role of lowering taxes over government spending in stimulating economic growth.
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