CollectionsResearch
IN THE NEWS

Research

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2014 | BY DANA DIFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
THE WAY David M. Jacobs sees it, aliens from outer space have been kidnapping humans for aeons and sexually molesting them to create human-alien hybrids that walk among us today undetected and will soon take over Earth. He knows that sounds crazy. But he long ago quit caring what people think of him. As director of the International Center for Abduction Research, Jacobs, 71, has made it his life's mission to investigate claims of extraterrestrial abduction. "What I'm doing will either be an interesting but nonessential footnote to popular culture or the most important thing that's ever happened to humankind.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central question in the debate over a Rutgers University-led study of the ocean floor off the coast of Long Beach Island is whether the loud sound waves used to map the sediment will harm dolphins, whales, and other animals. It is an area of scientific research that has been getting more attention since the mid-1990s, when researchers generated loud sounds in the Pacific Ocean to study the effect of water temperature on sound. People began to wonder whether marine mammals could hear the sound and, if so, if that was bad. Since then, scientists have trained some of the more intelligent species, such as dolphins, to tap a paddle when they hear a sound.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Loucks Rogers, 92, formerly of Norwood, Delaware County, a retired research chemist, died Thursday, July 10, of heart failure at Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne, Ind. He had lived at Peabody Retirement Center in North Manchester, Ind., since 2009. In 1996, he moved to Indiana to be near family. Born in Wilkinsburg, Pa., he lived in Pittsburgh until he was 9, when he moved to the Loucks family homestead and dairy farm in Scottdale, Pa. It was while working in the dairy that Mr. Rogers' lifelong interest in science was kindled.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University researchers have used state-of-the-art molecular scissors to cut out dormant HIV hiding in human cells, fueling hopes for curing - not just suppressing - the insidious infection that causes AIDS. The HIV removal experiment was conducted in cells in the lab, and the scissors did not work on every cell, so the approach is a long way from use in the clinic. Still, the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how new genetic editing technologies could be harnessed to conquer the AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The AIDS community mourned the loss of one of its top researchers and advocates in the jet crash in Ukraine, a "humanist" whose life - and death - reminded some of the death of another leading AIDS scientist, from Philadelphia, in a plane crash 16 years ago. Six delegates to the 20th International AIDS Conference - down from initial reports of 100 - were confirmed to have been on the plane, shot down en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia....
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert J. Stunkard, 92, a renowned pioneer in the research and treatment of obesity and eating disorders, died Saturday at his home in Bryn Mawr. Dr. Stunkard died suddenly after recovering from a recent bout of pneumonia, said his wife, Margaret S. Maurin. A professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, Dr. Stunkard, known as Mickey, was a passionate and obsessive researcher. He worked at his office at Penn until he was 90, said his wife.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
The surgeon delivered the bad news on Elizabeth Koniz's lumpectomy: "We didn't get clean margins. " Stunned, she couldn't think of anything else. "The words rang in my head," said Koniz, a 48-year-old admissions coordinator at Temple University School of Medicine. "I had terrible anxiety. I was nervous at medical appointments. I had tremendous trouble sleeping and cried for weeks after the diagnosis. " About a third of cancer patients experience high levels of anxiety - intense distress, although not typically to the level of post-traumatic stress disorder - after getting the diagnosis or during a difficult moment in treatment.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melinda H. Keefe shared the world's horror when a painting by Mark Rothko, one of her favorite artists, was defaced with graffiti. Along with her initial shock at the vandalism came another emotion: a determination to do something about it. Keefe, a senior research scientist at the Dow Chemical Co., volunteered her expertise in researching what solvents might work best at removing the vandal's ink. More than a year and a half later, the successfully...
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey sought an injunction Thursday to halt research off the coast that the state says "could adversely impact" marine life and the state's tourism and fishing industries. The complaint, filed in U.S. District Court in Trenton, seeks to prevent a National Science Foundation-owned research vessel from conducting studies that would involve aiming loud pulses of sound deep into the ocean floor. Special acoustic equipment would capture the reflected sound waves and convert them into images that would allow scientists to discern sea-level changes from as long ago as 50 million years.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David W. Taylor was eager to go bodysurfing with his son, Jonathan, but thought the waves at Cape May would be too tame for a good ride. Instead, he ended up getting a ride to the emergency room. Caught off-guard by a wave that hit him from behind that day in August 2007, the Lansdale resident suffered a broken neck - a type of injury that is all too familiar for physicians near New Jersey and Delaware beaches. In a single week in July 2012, for example, the AtlantiCare Regional Trauma Center in Atlantic City saw eight patients with spinal cord injuries sustained on the beach or in the water.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|