CollectionsResearch
IN THE NEWS

Research

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Wooden is a Philadelphia resident and registered voter. With two weeks until the mayoral primary election, he has no idea whom he is voting for. He is not alone. Like most of a dozen people interviewed during the lunch hour Monday at Dilworth Park, Wooden didn't know much about the candidates - even their names. Wooden said he had seen the television ads for a female candidate who said she would sue the state for not providing enough money for the schools. That would be Lynne M. Abraham, the former district attorney.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kellie Woll administered a few squirts of clear liquid to a dish full of wriggling tadpoles and within minutes, the creatures became completely still. A few minutes after that, they started to move again. No surprise, as the liquid contained propofol, a widely used anesthetic. With it and most other anesthetics, however, there is not much difference between the amount needed to put someone to sleep and the amount that will knock one out permanently. Woll works in the University of Pennsylvania lab of Roderic G. Eckenhoff, who is on a long-term quest for better alternatives.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth Rowen Heimlich, 82, of West Chester, former director of research for Merck, Sharp & Dohme, died Tuesday, March 17, of Alzheimer's disease at his home. Born to Herman and Lula Heimlich in Rockford, Ill., Dr. Heimlich grew up in Indiana. He earned a bachelor of science degree in 1954, a master's degree in 1956, and a doctorate in 1958, all in pharmaceutical chemistry from Purdue University. Dr. Heimlich was director of pharmaceutical research and development for Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in West Point.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a few days, surgeons at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are scheduled to operate on the heart of Graziella Nobile's newborn baby, fixing a grave arterial defect that, if left unrepaired, would be fatal. The hospital lately has a stellar record on that type of operation, in the sense of getting patients home alive. From 2009 to 2012, the most recent data available, 60 infants had this surgery, called an arterial switch, and all survived. The part that doctors have yet to figure out completely is the brain.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Simon's Fund, the local nonprofit that highlights the dangers of sudden cardiac death in children, has invested about $200,000 to build the first national registry for adolescent hearts. HeartBytes will collect data and imaging at screenings of students and young athletes nationwide and make it available for research into the puzzle of sudden cardiac arrest. Current plans call for academics to have free use of the data. But if "someone comes along who does have funds, like Pharma, I would entertain a fee for access," said Darren Sudman, cofounder of the fund named for his late son, Simon.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You wouldn't buy a car without negotiating, would you? Health care is the same now. Feb. 15 is the last day to sign up for a health-insurance policy and avoid a tax penalty to Uncle Sam that could total 2 percent of your income. If you don't have coverage, today's the day. If you have insurance, there are ways to save money on your medical bills. Because, let's face it, even the new insurance isn't that affordable. Silver and bronze plans under the Affordable Care Act carry median family deductibles of roughly $2,500 and $5,100, respectively, according to data from management-consulting firm McKinsey & Co. As health-care costs shift to consumers, we need to negotiate services at fair prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
NEW YORK - John Oliver began his HBO show last spring without much of a plan. And as "Last Week Tonight" returns at 11 p.m. Sunday, he's sticking with it. "I wouldn't really credit us with much thought or strategy," Oliver said of his satirical news show, which quickly won attention for its deep dives into topics as diverse - and unexpectedly entertaining - as net neutrality, the Miss America pageant and FIFA, the governing body for...
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|