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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When she found out early in her pregnancy that one of her identical twins would die at birth, Sarah Gray began a five-year journey that culminated last week in Philadelphia. She had to carry the sick baby to term in order to protect his healthy twin. And she also looked into organ and tissue donation. "Instead of thinking of our son as a victim," she said, "I started thinking of him as a contributor to research, to science. " On March 23, 2010, Thomas and Callum Gray were born at Fairfax Hospital in Virginia.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
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NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
FRC censures Josh Duggar The conservative Christian lobbying org that once employed Josh Duggar has sent a letter excoriating the reality star of now-canceled 19 Kids and Counting after he admitted he had cheated on wife Anna . "We are grieved by Josh's conduct. . . . His deceitful behavior harms his family, his friends . . . and the cause he has publicly espoused," writes Family Research Council prez Tony Perkins . "Josh's failures serve as a painful reminder of the destructive effects of not living with integrity.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOSEPH TERRANCE Heard had this dream. He would start a program for boys who have had discipline problems at school and encourage them to chase the same dream that led him to a successful career in science. It was part of Joe's lifelong commitment to encourage others to follow his path, which took him from a childhood of poverty in Philadelphia public housing to a fulfilling career in mathematics and science research. His brother, Justin, said Joe spent his "time and efforts mentoring many of the youth of our community trying to light the spark of knowledge and education wherever he could.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Planned Parenthood is under attack by antiabortion activists over secretly recorded videos showing its executives candidly talking about supplying fetal tissue for medical research. This abortion-related controversy is providing grist for the many Republican presidential candidates hitting the trail. But it is also reviving public interest in fetal tissue research, which has yielded advances that have saved the lives of countless babies. Consider rubella. During a U.S. epidemic in the mid-1960s, an estimated 31,000 pregnant women infected with the virus suffered stillbirths, gave birth to severely disabled infants, or decided to end their pregnancies.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new diabetes research project aims to develop medicines by marrying chemistry expertise from Rowan University with animal physiology knowledge at Rutgers-Camden. Researchers at Rowan have begun work on some promising medicines, while Rutgers-Camden professors hope to examine plant-based folk medicines from Africa. Rowan scholars have the background to explore the mechanisms behind the medicines, while Rutgers-Camden will focus on testing them on diabetic mice. "We need each other, because the people at Rowan are unable to test the results of their medicines on the physiology," said Joseph V. Martin, a biology professor and associate dean at Rutgers-Camden, who is one of the primary researchers on the project.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dr. Marvin E. Jaffe joined the former Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in 1970, son Jonathan said, he hit his stride. "During his career at Merck," his son wrote in an appreciation of his father, "he was responsible for bringing a number of first-in-class drugs" to market, such as Sinemet for Parkinson's disease and Mevacor for cholesterol treatment. And referring to the joint venture with the firm AB Astra, his son said, Dr. Jaffe "had an integral role in the Astra-Merck alliance, which resulted in the development" of the heartburn drug Prilosec.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Chicago Blackhawks, it's the Stanley Cup. For the New England Patriots, it was the Super Bowl ring. For Cherry Hill Mall shopper Jennifer Sommers, the moment of glory was the fabulous Michael Kors purse she scored on Memorial Day. Already 35 percent off, the price was slashed another 25 percent in the holiday sale. "It was at least a $300 purse," crowed a triumphant Sommers, 36, a social worker from Northeast Philadelphia. She was back at the mall recently with bags of booty from the semiannual sales at Bath and Body Works - $12.50 body wash for $3.50!
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Editor's note: This is the first in an occasional series about key people and discoveries at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, this year marking its 250th anniversary.   Fifty years ago, most scientists dismissed the idea that cancer could be seeded by the same kind of germ as colds and the flu. Not Gertrude and Werner Henle, husband-and-wife virologists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins reminded biotech executives Wednesday in Philadelphia that the big money they hope to make from drugs, medical devices, and other health care technology often starts with the taxpayers. "NIH is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the world," Collins told a packed conference room at the BIO International 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. He then cautioned them about the political and economic realities of America.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 50 years after the Epstein-Barr virus was discovered to cause human cancers, there are no good treatment options for the 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually, most of them in the world's poorest places. The Wistar Institute aims to change that. The illustrious Philadelphia research center last month received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust in London to continue developing a novel anti-viral drug. "We certainly hope that this first-in-class drug we are developing will slow the progression or - even better - cure these deadly cancers," said Wistar senior scientist Troy Messick.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The small shorebird - a ruddy turnstone - was not happy. Moments ago, it had been feasting on horseshoe crab eggs along the waterline of Delaware Bay near Villas, N.J. But now, University of Georgia researcher Deb Carter had a gentle but inescapable grip on the bird, and her colleague Clara Kienzle was sticking a cotton swab down its throat. Next, they swabbed the bird's other end and then jabbed a slim needle into a vein to draw blood before releasing it. Their goal: to see if this healthy bird was carrying a flu virus.
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