CollectionsResearch
IN THE NEWS

Research

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | Susan A. Masino, FOR THE INQUIRER
Susan A. Masino, the Vernon Roosa Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, studies links among metabolism, brain activity, and behavior. Brain disorders are expensive, and their costs to families and society can never be calculated fully. As a neuroscientist, I know that despite heroic research efforts our current medical treatments rarely cure neurological problems - and often can't treat them effectively. Devastating and complex problems with our fragile and amazing nervous system span all ages.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Don Sapatkin, Staff Writer
In the biggest effort yet to find a cure for HIV, the National Institutes of Health on Wednesday named six large scientific teams, one led by Philadelphia's Wistar Institute and the University of Pennsylvania, to tackle different parts of the challenge. The government will commit $30 million a year for five years to the project. The Philadelphia collaboration will get $4.6 million a year. For years, with the world focused on getting treatment to millions of infected people and preventing further spread of the disease, the notion of a "cure seemed naive and overambitious," said Luis J. Montaner, the director of an HIV laboratory at Wistar, who will share leadership of the Philadelphia team.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
Universities are brimming with research, and four in the Philadelphia region rank in the top 50 worldwide for the number of U.S. patents granted for groundbreaking technologies in 2015. The University of Pennsylvania was No. 19 among 600 universities, with 93 patents issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office last year. Rutgers University ranked 27th, with 65 patents. The University of Pittsburgh came in 35th, with 58 patents. Drexel University was No. 49 with 42 patents issued in 2015.
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | Susan A. Masino, FOR THE INQUIRER
Susan A. Masino, the Vernon Roosa Professor of Applied Science at Trinity College, studies links among metabolism, brain activity, and behavior. Brain disorders are expensive, and their costs to families and society can never be calculated fully. As a neuroscientist, I know that despite heroic research efforts our current medical treatments rarely cure neurological problems - and often can't treat them effectively. Devastating and complex problems with our fragile and amazing nervous system span all ages.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | Suzanne Barston
I was dismayed to see the interview with Arnetta Stewart and Katja Pigur of the Maternity Care Coalition (" An effort to increase breast-feeding in Philly " which appreared on June 5). While the breast-feeding initiation rates cited are spot-on (78 percent of mothers initiating breast-feeding), the hand-wringing about their inadequacy is not. These statistics do not take into account the deeply personal reasons the remaining 22 percent do not breast-feed from birth - women who have undergone mastectomies, women on certain contraindicated or borderline medications, and women who have histories of sexual trauma, to name a few. Seen in proper context, 79 percent nationwide is pretty darn impressive.
BUSINESS
May 25, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, Staff Writer
A small biotech company and a global vaccine maker in Southeastern Pennsylvania are among those racing to come up with a vaccine to combat the rise in the spread of the Zika virus in Brazil and other countries. The United States has yet to face a major outbreak, but concern is growing, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday that the number of pregnant women in the U.S. infected with the Zika virus had tripled - from 48 to 157 - due to a change in the way the government counts cases.
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The only NFL player to openly advocate for medical marijuana has donated $80,000 to fund cannabis research on football players at the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University. Eugene Monroe, an offensive tackle for the Baltimore Ravens, previously urged the NFL to remove marijuana from its banned-substances list so players can use it to treat chronic pain. "As a player, I'm not allowed to use cannabis, but I've been prescribed opioids for various injuries," Monroe said Thursday evening.
NEWS
May 13, 2016 | By Stacey Burling, Staff Writer
As a researcher who raised concerns about what antipsychotics can do to the brain, Nancy Andreasen emphasized one message Wednesday in talks with Episcopal Hospital's psychiatric staff and students: The drugs are still worth using in people with schizophrenia, but should be used as sparingly as possible, especially in children and the elderly. "It doesn't mean that we shouldn't be using antipsychotics," said Andreasen, chair of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.
NEWS
May 7, 2016
By Michael O. Leavitt The late Neil Armstrong once said, "Research is creating new knowledge. " In recent years, the world has witnessed unprecedented medical advances that have forever changed how we research and treat debilitating diseases. For example, new discoveries in the field of immunotherapy are helping scientists rethink their approach to cancer. Hepatitis C, which had a cure rate of 40 to 50 percent just five years ago, is curable in nine out of 10 patients today. Even diseases like cystic fibrosis, which deprive most patients of living past their late 20s, are seeing new treatments after decades of having none.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Linda Loyd, STAFF WRITER
GlaxoSmithKline is partnering with a San Diego research institute to study brain function and treatments to potentially reverse or slow down neurodegeneration. The Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla and GlaxoSmithKline, which has operations in the Philadelphia area, will create a center on Sanford Burnham's campus with the goal of finding new medicines for diseases such as Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. Under a three-year agreement, GSK will fund a research laboratory where scientists and staff from Sanford Burnham will work with GSK neuroscientists.
NEWS
April 14, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Billionaire tech guru Sean Parker on Wednesday announced a $250 million effort to accelerate development of revolutionary cancer technology by uniting the University of Pennsylvania and five other leading research centers. Each of the centers has received an initial $10 million to $15 million grant to team with the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy. Among its goals is sharing the kind of data and discoveries that normally are guarded closely as the bases for patents and profits.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|