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NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
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NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Chicago Blackhawks, it's the Stanley Cup. For the New England Patriots, it was the Super Bowl ring. For Cherry Hill Mall shopper Jennifer Sommers, the moment of glory was the fabulous Michael Kors purse she scored on Memorial Day. Already 35 percent off, the price was slashed another 25 percent in the holiday sale. "It was at least a $300 purse," crowed a triumphant Sommers, 36, a social worker from Northeast Philadelphia. She was back at the mall recently with bags of booty from the semiannual sales at Bath and Body Works - $12.50 body wash for $3.50!
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Editor's note: This is the first in an occasional series about key people and discoveries at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, this year marking its 250th anniversary.   Fifty years ago, most scientists dismissed the idea that cancer could be seeded by the same kind of germ as colds and the flu. Not Gertrude and Werner Henle, husband-and-wife virologists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins reminded biotech executives Wednesday in Philadelphia that the big money they hope to make from drugs, medical devices, and other health care technology often starts with the taxpayers. "NIH is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the world," Collins told a packed conference room at the BIO International 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. He then cautioned them about the political and economic realities of America.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 50 years after the Epstein-Barr virus was discovered to cause human cancers, there are no good treatment options for the 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually, most of them in the world's poorest places. The Wistar Institute aims to change that. The illustrious Philadelphia research center last month received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust in London to continue developing a novel anti-viral drug. "We certainly hope that this first-in-class drug we are developing will slow the progression or - even better - cure these deadly cancers," said Wistar senior scientist Troy Messick.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The small shorebird - a ruddy turnstone - was not happy. Moments ago, it had been feasting on horseshoe crab eggs along the waterline of Delaware Bay near Villas, N.J. But now, University of Georgia researcher Deb Carter had a gentle but inescapable grip on the bird, and her colleague Clara Kienzle was sticking a cotton swab down its throat. Next, they swabbed the bird's other end and then jabbed a slim needle into a vein to draw blood before releasing it. Their goal: to see if this healthy bird was carrying a flu virus.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SEEMA S. SONNAD was passionate about her researches in the health services field, but she had another passion, running. She was one of those runners who think mere marathons (26.2 miles) are not challenging enough. They go for the big distances. It was while running an ultramarathon in Washington State on May 27 that Seema suffered a cardiac arrhythmia. She died in Valley Medical Center in Renton, Wash. She was 52 and had homes in West Philadelphia and Chadds Ford. Seema S. Sonnad was director of Health Services Research for the Value Institute at Christiana Care Health System in Wilmington, Del., a position to which she was appointed in October 2012.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Russell Turner, 103, of Ardmore, a senior research scientist at the Atlantic Richfield Co. from 1940 to 1971 and a member of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange from 1971 to 1994, died Wednesday, May 20, of respiratory failure at home. Mr. Turner was born in the coal region of Schuylkill County. His father died when he was 6, so he learned to find his way at an early age. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and was first employed by ARCO as an operator in the cracking department of a refinery, where petroleum crude is converted into gasoline and other products.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Wooden is a Philadelphia resident and registered voter. With two weeks until the mayoral primary election, he has no idea whom he is voting for. He is not alone. Like most of a dozen people interviewed during the lunch hour Monday at Dilworth Park, Wooden didn't know much about the candidates - even their names. Wooden said he had seen the television ads for a female candidate who said she would sue the state for not providing enough money for the schools. That would be Lynne M. Abraham, the former district attorney.
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