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July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
NEWS
July 29, 1992
President Bush illustrated his slavish obedience to the anti-abortion fringe when he vetoed a law that would have permitted federal funding of fetal tissue research. And "fringe" it is. Even such a committed abortion foe as Sen. Strom Thurmond recognizes that fetal tissue research offers potential for treatment of debilitating diseases like Parkinson's, Huntingdon's and Alzheimer's. There is a difference between abortion and using fetal tissue, regardless of personal views.
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NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When Denise Savarese, 60, of Sicklerville learned that she had a progressive form of multiple sclerosis in 1992, she feared breaking the news to her mother. Yet before she could, her mother pointed to herself and said, "I heard you have this. " She could not bear to say out loud that her daughter shared the MS that had severely limited her own life. But given major advances in MS care over the last 20 years, Savarese's path would differ greatly from her mother's. In 1993, Savarese was put on the first injectable drug for MS, betaseron, a form of interferon that can prevent flare-ups.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO Rowan University announced Tuesday that it had entered an agreement with Lockheed Martin to have the company collaborate with the university's students and faculty on research and development of radar technology. The move builds on a project begun last fall and, Rowan administrators said, is a new model for universities working with industry. The school has made high-profile pledges to expand, especially its research enterprise, with the engineering school seen as a core part of that mission.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
HARRISBURG The Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape (PCAR) on Wednesday awarded its annual Vision of Hope grant to Chiara Sabina to assess the current knowledge and attitudes of Pennsylvanians regarding child sexual abuse. Sabina, an assistant professor of social sciences at Penn State Harrisburg, is also an independent researcher of interpersonal violence, particularly sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and teen dating violence. PCAR grants up to $50,000 each year from its Vision of Hope Fund to support prevention projects in Pennsylvania and across the country to help teach adults how to create safer environments for children.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG Auditor General Eugene DePasquale announced Wednesday that he was undertaking an audit of the state health department's handling of nearly $800 million in research funding provided by the national tobacco settlement. "These funds are intended to fuel health-care research that could help people live longer, healthier, and more rewarding lives," DePasquale said. "We have to make sure these research programs are meeting expectations so that nothing jeopardizes their vital mission or erodes public confidence.
NEWS
March 13, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO Months after it became the second state-recognized public research university in New Jersey, Rowan University on Tuesday announced a new effort to connect faculty and student research initiatives with the dollars needed to kick-start them. The Rowan University Foundation, a fund-raising branch of the university, has allocated $5 million to the new program, called the Rowan Venture Fund. University officials said that the new fund was unique in the region and that it would help research ideas get started at "their earliest stages," potentially breeding job growth and economic activity.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
With surgery and chemotherapy, Roberta Bash, 67, of Downingtown beat advanced-stage ovarian cancer in 2010. Then, it came back. "Cancer can go dormant, and I didn't know that," she said. The second time, Bash wanted to explore all her options - including an experimental treatment at Penn Medicine that manipulates a patient's tumor cells to trigger an immune response. So, during her surgery last March, instead of allowing her tumor to be tossed out or donated for research, she saved it. The company StoreMyTumor, which markets itself as a concierge service for tumors, negotiated the tissue's harvest, processing, and cryopreservation.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
University of Pennsylvania researchers have snipped out a single gene in patients' immune cells to make them partly resistant to infection with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The study, in this week's New England Journal of Medicine, bolsters hope for controlling HIV without daily antiviral drugs - a so-called functional cure. But even more important, as the first paper to report the modification of an exact spot in human DNA, it marks the arrival of the age of gene editing.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wind turbines have been lauded as carbon-free energy sources, and denounced as whirring monsters that kill birds, bats, and scenic views. The twain have yet to meet. But what if wind energy could do more than just crank out electricity? What if it could blow away Mother Nature with a massive offshore array of turbines powerful enough to blunt the force of hurricanes? Researchers from the University of Delaware and Stanford University have concluded it is possible. Their computer model showed that a large wind farm off the East Coast could have have reduced the wind speed of Hurricane Sandy about 80 m.p.h., and lessened the storm surge - the flooding that ruined so many homes and businesses - up to 21 percent.
NEWS
March 2, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Last fall, the director of the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center briefed the legislative cancer caucus on the center's groundbreaking research on a variety of potentially deadly forms of the disease. In one case detailed by Chi Dang, doctors with Penn and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia used a novel cell-engineering treatment on a young leukemia patient as part of a clinical trial involving acute forms of leukemia. That was two years ago. The little girl remains cancer-free.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Personalized medicine is all the rage in cancer treatment, as doctors increasingly tailor medicines to specific mutations in patients' tumors. Now, the approach is making its way into addiction treatment. A new study from the University of Pennsylvania found that heavy drinkers significantly reduced their drinking when they took the anticonvulsant drug topiramate - but only if they had a specific genetic profile. Henry R. Kranzler, director of Penn's Center for Studies of Addiction and the study's lead author, said researchers also have found that genes affect response to two other drugs being tested in alcoholics: naltrexone and ondansetron, an antinausea drug.
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