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July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
July 29, 1992
President Bush illustrated his slavish obedience to the anti-abortion fringe when he vetoed a law that would have permitted federal funding of fetal tissue research. And "fringe" it is. Even such a committed abortion foe as Sen. Strom Thurmond recognizes that fetal tissue research offers potential for treatment of debilitating diseases like Parkinson's, Huntingdon's and Alzheimer's. There is a difference between abortion and using fetal tissue, regardless of personal views.
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NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. co-founder and philanthropist Paul G. Allen is giving $100 million to establish the Allen Institute for Cell Science in Seattle. The donation was announced Monday in Philadelphia at the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology. Allen's new nonprofit group will focus on the relationship between human genetic information, cell development, and cell behavior. The goal, Allen said in a news release, is to create a "comprehensive, predictive model of the cell.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, researchers have been seeking a blood test that could diagnose a concussion and tell whether it is severe enough to cause lasting brain damage. In a big step toward that holy grail, University of Pennsylvania scientists have found that a blood protein called SNTF surged and stayed elevated in professional hockey players with persistent concussion symptoms, but not in players who recovered within a few days. "These results show that SNTF has promise as a blood biomarker for sports-related concussion," said Robert Siman, a research professor of neurosurgery at Penn and lead author of the study in last month's Journal of Neurotrauma.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Holtzer, 92, of West Philadelphia, a longtime professor and researcher in cell and developmental biology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at his home. Dr. Holtzer remained active in his research at Penn until a few years before his death. He is survived by his wife and research collaborator of 64 years, Sybil Holtzer. His research into the ways cells communicate was described as groundbreaking. "While doing research in the laboratory of Dr. Paul Weiss in Chicago, he did his first extraordinary experiments and made observations that historically are the foundation of much of the molecular work on inductive signals between tissues and how cells communicate during development," said Bernice J. Koplin, his estate lawyer.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, the search for a treatment that will save our oldest generation from the scourge of Alzheimer's disease has been a long, frustrating slog. Paul Aisen, an Alzheimer's expert from the University of California, San Diego, explained why. For decades, researchers were dealing with a deadly disease that had no apparent symptoms for the first 15 years or so. When the symptoms started, they were not specific to Alzheimer's. By the time they got bad, the brain was already severely damaged.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia's Board of Directors of City Trusts will honor three researchers with the 2014 John Scott Award for their discoveries, which led to a new cancer treatment and understanding of how people age. Susan Band Horwitz, Leonard Hayflick, and Paul Moorhead will be awarded cash prizes and the Scott Medal on Friday at the American Philosophical Society. Horwitz, who co-chairs the department of molecular pharmacology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, got a letter from the National Cancer Institute in 1977 asking her to work on Taxol.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
While Pennsylvania's education secretary mulls applications for three new cyber charter schools, a Philadelphia research group has released a paper stating that none of the 14 existing cybers meets state academic standards. The results of the state's school performance profiles, released this month, show that cybers "continue to lag far behind both traditional public and charter schools," according to a policy brief that Research for Action released Monday. Kate Shaw, executive director of the independent research organization, said she hoped the analysis would be considered by Carolyn C. Dumaresq as the acting education secretary reviews proposals for the three new cybers.
NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
The March of Dimes Foundation and the University of Pennsylvania announced a joint research effort Monday to find some of the causes of premature birth, in the hope that doctors can prevent more infants from being born early. Premature birth is the leading cause of death among newborns, and can also cause lifelong health issues, such as respiratory or organ problems, cerebral palsy, infections, developmental or learning disabilities, and behavioral problems. One in nine U.S. babies is born prematurely - before 37 weeks; in Philadelphia the figure is one in eight.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calvin J. Dooley, 89, of Absecon, N.J., a former research physicist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture office in Wyndmoor, died of kidney failure Friday, Oct. 31, at home. Born in Newport News, Va., Mr. Dooley graduated from Lumberton High School and became a fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad, shoveling coal on steam engines. He was a Navy machinist's mate on a destroyer and a destroyer tender in the South Pacific during World War II. Mr. Dooley was a lineman in the 1946 season for the semiprofessional football team the Gloucester City Mustangs, while being assigned jobs out of a hiring hall for a local of the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, a nephew, Charles Huber, said.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many Americans view the poor as a permanent underclass of slackers who dodge work and skate through life on the taxpayer's dime. But recent research shows the poor are anything but monolithic. And poverty is a lot more common experience than people think. More than 40 percent of Americans between ages 25 and 60 will be poor for at least a year, said Mark Rank, a professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. "It's not that people aren't working hard or trying," Rank said.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many 11-year-olds, Morgan Laufgraben of Cherry Hill enjoys playing soccer. She is a member of a travel team, the Blades. Morgan's parents, however, unlike other spectators in the stands, are eager not only to watch the team score goals but also to hear their daughter's insulin levels shouted out by the coaches during game breaks. The Beck Middle School sixth-grader was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2012. Through her meal planning and frequent insulin checks for a disease that is currently incurable, Morgan's family said she had maintained a positive outlook.
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