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July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
February 18, 2007 | By Teresa Anicola FOR THE INQUIRER
Trina Gipson-Jones, a registered nurse, has focused her career on helping minorities - not just locally, but also nationally and abroad. She conducts research for the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Health Disparities. On Feb. 3, she was honored for her work by the National Black Nurses Association and was the recipient of a research excellence award. Gipson-Jones has worked at the center, within the university's school of nursing, for two years. She holds a master's degree in nursing administration and a doctorate in nursing.
NEWS
August 12, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
One of the most controversial alternatives to using animals in scientific research involves the bodies of brain-dead people, or "neomorts. " Proposals to use neomorts "could revolutionize research, toxicity testing and education and thereby greatly reduce our reliance on laboratory animals," said Martin Stephens, an associate director of the Humane Society of the United States. Each year, more than two million people die in the United States; 150,000 die from accidents, suicides and other causes that leave their bodies intact, Stephens said.
NEWS
February 20, 2003 | By Kristin E. Holmes INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. David B.P. Goodman, 60, of Wynnewood, a medical school professor, researcher, and director of the endocrinology laboratory at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, died of septic shock Monday at Lankenau Hospital. Dr. Goodman decided on a career in research when he was a student at Harvard University, where scientist James Watson, a discoverer of the structure of DNA, was a member of the faculty. A biology major, Dr. Goodman was inspired by Watson's groundbreaking achievement and resolved to focus his future medical career on research science, said his wife, Kathleen Greenacre Goodman.
NEWS
August 21, 1987 | By Dale Mezzacappa, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jung Kim, 15, and Hermina Paczynski, 16, hovered over their thick, black desk-top machine - a double-beam spectrophotometer - and checked their vials of bubbly yellow liquid. Kim dropped a vial into a small compartment of the machine that contained a light and a mirror, and the students watched as squiggly lines on the connected printer told them what they needed to know: how much light passes through the substance in the vial. For Kim and Paczynski, this is exciting work.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By Lisa Scheid, Special to The Inquirer
The eight-month-old Weston Institute, founded by the man who started the environmental management firm of Roy F. Weston Inc., is up and running with more than a half-million dollars in funding and a plan to encourage research in the environmental industry. The institute, based in West Chester, will develop a catalogue of potential research projects generated by professionals working for companies in the environmental and health-safety fields. "The professionals have a unique perspective on the environmentalresearch," said Weston Institutepresident William Gaither, the former president of Drexel University.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | By GENE SEYMOUR, Daily News Staff Writer
Trying to tie together the known forces of the universe isn't much different than achieving perfection in body and mind, Linc Gotshalk figures. For sure, they're both fairly impossible goals. No matter. To Gotshalk, strength and weightlifting coach at Temple University, it's the trying that counts. That's why, with all the available athletic role models in existence, Gotshalk's main man among men is a bespectacled, internationally renowned British physicist named Stephen Hawking, who is bound to a wheelchair by amyotrophic lateral sclerosi, more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | By LARRY KRAMER
I know that many of you believe that hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent wisely and well on conquering AIDS, that the battle against this scourge is in good hands and that we are close to finding a cure. Well, I must disillusion you. I recently attended a meeting of America's leading AIDS doctors and researchers, convened by the National Institutes of Health. It was a very depressing meeting. There is no good news about any treatment to conquer HIV, the human immuno- deficiency virus that causes acquired immune-deficiency syndrome.
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leon Salganicoff, 86, of Center City, a professor emeritus of pharmacology at the Temple University School of Medicine who dealt with challenges on two continents to pursue important medical research, died of heart failure Sunday, April 17, at Montgomery Hospital Medical Center in Norristown. A native of Argentina, Dr. Salganicoff earned a degree in pharmacy and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Buenos Aires. He refused to take a political propaganda course and was denied his diploma until after dictator Juan Peron was overthrown in 1955.
NEWS
July 29, 1992
President Bush illustrated his slavish obedience to the anti-abortion fringe when he vetoed a law that would have permitted federal funding of fetal tissue research. And "fringe" it is. Even such a committed abortion foe as Sen. Strom Thurmond recognizes that fetal tissue research offers potential for treatment of debilitating diseases like Parkinson's, Huntingdon's and Alzheimer's. There is a difference between abortion and using fetal tissue, regardless of personal views.
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NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
The March of Dimes Foundation and the University of Pennsylvania announced a joint research effort Monday to find some of the causes of premature birth, in the hope that doctors can prevent more infants from being born early. Premature birth is the leading cause of death among newborns, and can also cause lifelong health issues, such as respiratory or organ problems, cerebral palsy, infections, developmental or learning disabilities, and behavioral problems. One in nine U.S. babies is born prematurely - before 37 weeks; in Philadelphia the figure is one in eight.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calvin J. Dooley, 89, of Absecon, N.J., a former research physicist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture office in Wyndmoor, died of kidney failure Friday, Oct. 31, at home. Born in Newport News, Va., Mr. Dooley graduated from Lumberton High School and became a fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad, shoveling coal on steam engines. He was a Navy machinist's mate on a destroyer and a destroyer tender in the South Pacific during World War II. Mr. Dooley was a lineman in the 1946 season for the semiprofessional football team the Gloucester City Mustangs, while being assigned jobs out of a hiring hall for a local of the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, a nephew, Charles Huber, said.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many Americans view the poor as a permanent underclass of slackers who dodge work and skate through life on the taxpayer's dime. But recent research shows the poor are anything but monolithic. And poverty is a lot more common experience than people think. More than 40 percent of Americans between ages 25 and 60 will be poor for at least a year, said Mark Rank, a professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. "It's not that people aren't working hard or trying," Rank said.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many 11-year-olds, Morgan Laufgraben of Cherry Hill enjoys playing soccer. She is a member of a travel team, the Blades. Morgan's parents, however, unlike other spectators in the stands, are eager not only to watch the team score goals but also to hear their daughter's insulin levels shouted out by the coaches during game breaks. The Beck Middle School sixth-grader was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2012. Through her meal planning and frequent insulin checks for a disease that is currently incurable, Morgan's family said she had maintained a positive outlook.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgewater Park Township has agreed to pay $1,900 in legal fees incurred by a paid political researcher who sued over a delayed open-records request. Jim Logue, a Medford resident who works for the Burlington County Republican Committee, requested 15 years of public records - 21,500 pages - and filed suit when the township failed to provide them within 14 days. Looking for information on Edgewater Park Mayor Tom Pullion, a Democrat running this fall for the Burlington County Board of Freeholders, Logue asked for electronic copies of meeting minutes, ordinances, resolutions, bills, permits, cellphone records, payroll, property taxes, and grant applications, among other documents dating to 1999, when Pullion was first elected to the council.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania professor who studies psychopaths has found hope for improving human behavior in a surprising place: fish oil. A new study led by Adrian Raine, a psychologist in Penn's criminology department, found giving children a fruit drink mixed with omega-3 fatty acids - a key ingredient in fish oil - improved their behavior. Strangely, the behavior of parents also improved, even though they weren't taking the supplements. More on that later. Raine's ultimate goal is ambitious: to reduce crime.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research is suing a Camden nonprofit, saying it compromised nearly 26,000 research tubes when a freezer door was left open in March. The tubes of blood and other fluids were stored at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research along Haddon Avenue, and would have been used to study the causes of Parkinson's disease, according to the lawsuit. It was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in New Jersey. Fox's foundation, according to the suit, signed two contracts - one in 2010, the other 2011 - worth a combined $4.3 million to store the tubes at Coriell.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bleach-white laboratory on the fifth floor of an austere building at Thomas Jefferson University, Matthias J. Schnell plays with biological grenades. Schnell is a microbiologist who specializes in filoviruses - the microorganisms that cause hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola. For more than a decade, he has been working on vaccines to prevent the kind of tragedy now ravaging thousands of people in West Africa. "Filovirus research was a very unimportant field," said Schnell, director of the Jefferson Vaccine Center.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUDY Spitzer suffered through two great upheavals in her life, one caused by human venality and the other by nature. As a teenager, she was caught up in the Holocaust, but managed through guts and ingenuity to escape the Nazis, who murdered her father and other family members. Then, 70 years later, Hurricane Katrina drove her and her husband out of New Orleans, where they were teaching at a medical school. Finally settling in the relative peace of the Philadelphia area, Judy could look back on a life of accomplishment realized in the toils of catastrophes that might have wrecked less fearless souls.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Are you sure you have the right person?" Danielle S. Bassett asked. The University of Pennsylvania brain researcher is just 32, one year into her first faculty position. So when the MacArthur Foundation people called her last week, Bassett figured they were planning to award one of their coveted $625,000 grants to an older colleague, and wanted to ask her opinion. No, they wanted Bassett. The foundation named her and 20 others Wednesday as the winners of its annual fellowships, informally dubbed the "genius grants" by the media in 1981, the first year they were awarded.
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