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Research Paper

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NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Suproteem Sarkar has coauthored two scientific papers on cancer treatments, been a presenter at an international nanoscience conference, and won accolades as a pianist. But perhaps the most notable entry on his resumé is the birth date - Sarkar is 17, just entering his senior year at Conestoga High School in Berwyn, Chester County. "He's definitely a highflier here," said Conestoga principal Amy Meisinger. "He's on the fast track for something. " Family members say his precocity was evident almost from the beginning.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Seleeke Flingai
Jenny McCarthy is not necessarily a bad person. Yet when Barbara Walters announced recently that the anti-vaccination advocate would become the newest cohost of ABC's daytime talk show The View , my scientific colleagues and I cringed. McCarthy's hiring and the reaction to the news were the talk of our vaccine research lab. My coworkers initially laughed at the absurdity of the announcement but eventually settled into a state of unease. Sherri Shepherd of The View had this to say about her new cohost: "Jenny McCarthy is fearless.
NEWS
April 17, 2007 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In honor of the Philadelphian who founded the local firms Braun Labs and Decor Bulbs Inc., the Honolulu-based Pacific Telecommunications Council has created an award to be presented to an outstanding telecommunications and information technology student. The O.S. Braunstein Prize - which will total $1,700 and include a $500 cash award, registration, and up to $1,000 for travel and accommodations at the annual PTC conference in Honolulu from Jan. 13 to 16 - will be given to a student whose research paper is recognized for excellence in the field of telecommunications.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. food manufacturers have long opposed labeling foods that contain genetically modified ingredients. They fear that consumers would interpret the label as a warning. That fear is well-founded, according to a paper being presented today at a St. Joseph's University conference on global perceptions of biotechnology. After meetings with focus groups, researchers at St. Joseph's and Rutgers University concluded that many consumers would avoid buying products if they knew they contained genetically engineered ingredients.
NEWS
October 11, 2011
Article questions anthrax finding HAGERSTOWN, Md. - A scientific journal plans to publish a research paper questioning the government's conclusion that an Army microbiologist at Fort Detrick was the sole perpetrator of the 2001 anthrax attacks that killed five people and sickened 17, two of the article's authors said Monday. The article will be published in the Journal of Bioterrorism & Biodefense, said the chief author, Louisiana State University epidemiologist Martin Hugh-Jones.
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | From Inquirer Wire Services
A scientific journal said yesterday that it would retract a research paper bearing the name of a Nobel Prize-winning biologist after a government report said the paper was partly based on faked data. The molecular biologist, David Baltimore, now president of Rockefeller University in New York, had long defended the study, which has been criticized since its publication in the journal Cell in 1986. A National Institutes of Health report, which was leaked to news organizations Wednesday, does not implicate Baltimore in the alleged fraud, but criticizes him for defending the paper's integrity despite evidence to the contrary.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Alease Gardler began her day at St. Charles Borromeo School in Drexel Hill listening to an in-school television broadcast on the plight of those starving in Somalia. Afterward, Alease, a 13-year-old from Lansdowne, headed to the school library to learn more about the African country - not from a standard reference book, but by placing a compact disc into the library's computer. That's one way St. Charles is integrating technology with traditional school lessons, librarian Pat Kirlin said.
NEWS
February 8, 1999 | By Candace Heckman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Hitler's mustache was itchy. But that was a trifling note in Tom Weise's serious attempt to portray an important "bad guy" to remember. History was alive last week as sixth graders at Harrison Elementary School donned costumes and the identities of 147 famous figures in a living time line. Families filed into the school auditorium to meet heroes, villains and celebrities - from Cleopatra (Sherry Hignutt) in white and gold to Shirley Temple (Lauren Black) in pink baby-doll dress and short, red curls.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | By John Corcoran, Special to The Inquirer
Mention research paper to a classroom of high school students, and chances are you'll hear more than just a few sighs of exasperation and discontent. But students at Penn Wood High School are beginning to discover that research isn't as boring and time-consuming as it used to be. A new computerized, talking encyclopedia that the school recently installed has piqued the curiosity of more than a few students, and school officials predict it will quickly become the most popular resource in the library.
NEWS
November 19, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann has donated $100,000 to help fund undergraduate student research, the university announced yesterday. It's the second gift that Gutmann and her husband, Michael Doyle, have made to the university since she became president in June 2004, bringing their total donation to $250,000. "It's one of the experiences that makes students at Penn really excited about their undergraduate time here and I thought that it would be important to make a gift that supported students having the kind of undergraduate experiences I had," she said in an interview yesterday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 23, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Suproteem Sarkar has coauthored two scientific papers on cancer treatments, been a presenter at an international nanoscience conference, and won accolades as a pianist. But perhaps the most notable entry on his resumé is the birth date - Sarkar is 17, just entering his senior year at Conestoga High School in Berwyn, Chester County. "He's definitely a highflier here," said Conestoga principal Amy Meisinger. "He's on the fast track for something. " Family members say his precocity was evident almost from the beginning.
NEWS
January 3, 2014
IF YOU RESOLVED to save more for your retirement in 2014, you may be happy to hear about some new research on estimating the income you'll need. To have enough money for when you are no longer working, you have to know your "number. " That is a calculation based on various factors such as the rate of inflation, how much you are expecting from Social Security, an estimate of how much your investments might earn and how long you think you might live. The calculation also estimates the percentage of pre-retirement income you'll need to replace.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Seleeke Flingai
Jenny McCarthy is not necessarily a bad person. Yet when Barbara Walters announced recently that the anti-vaccination advocate would become the newest cohost of ABC's daytime talk show The View , my scientific colleagues and I cringed. McCarthy's hiring and the reaction to the news were the talk of our vaccine research lab. My coworkers initially laughed at the absurdity of the announcement but eventually settled into a state of unease. Sherri Shepherd of The View had this to say about her new cohost: "Jenny McCarthy is fearless.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Barbara Baals von Franzke
Next week, both of my children will be confirmed. They will come together in the very spot where my parents were married, where my dear aunt's casket rested, where so many of our family members, including me and three of my children's four godparents, also stood as awkward, unsure 14-year-olds. Together, my twins, now 14 themselves, will make a public profession of their faith and a lifelong pledge of faithfulness to Christ during the Lutheran rite of Confirmation. Actually, only one of my children will.
SPORTS
August 15, 2012 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
NORTH CAROLINA is investigating how what appears to be a transcript for former football star Julius Peppers surfaced on the university's website. In a statement Monday, the school said it has removed the link and that it couldn't discuss confidential student information covered by federal privacy laws. The school didn't confirm the authenticity of the partial grade summary, which lists Peppers' name at the top. "Student academic records should never be accessible to the public, and the university is investigating reports of what appears to be a former student transcript on the university's website," the school said.
NEWS
December 25, 2011
Kat Aaron is a project editor with the Investigative Reporting Workshop at American University in Washington Some call this moment the Great Recession. As the hardship has lingered, others have begun calling it the Little Depression. But equating the hard times of the 1930s with the hard times of today is mostly overblown rhetoric. Or is it? On the surface, the comparisons are obvious: a period of great wealth and exuberance followed by a stock market crash. After the crash, widespread economic pain.
NEWS
October 11, 2011
Article questions anthrax finding HAGERSTOWN, Md. - A scientific journal plans to publish a research paper questioning the government's conclusion that an Army microbiologist at Fort Detrick was the sole perpetrator of the 2001 anthrax attacks that killed five people and sickened 17, two of the article's authors said Monday. The article will be published in the Journal of Bioterrorism & Biodefense, said the chief author, Louisiana State University epidemiologist Martin Hugh-Jones.
NEWS
November 19, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
University of Pennsylvania president Amy Gutmann has donated $100,000 to help fund undergraduate student research, the university announced yesterday. It's the second gift that Gutmann and her husband, Michael Doyle, have made to the university since she became president in June 2004, bringing their total donation to $250,000. "It's one of the experiences that makes students at Penn really excited about their undergraduate time here and I thought that it would be important to make a gift that supported students having the kind of undergraduate experiences I had," she said in an interview yesterday.
NEWS
April 17, 2007 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In honor of the Philadelphian who founded the local firms Braun Labs and Decor Bulbs Inc., the Honolulu-based Pacific Telecommunications Council has created an award to be presented to an outstanding telecommunications and information technology student. The O.S. Braunstein Prize - which will total $1,700 and include a $500 cash award, registration, and up to $1,000 for travel and accommodations at the annual PTC conference in Honolulu from Jan. 13 to 16 - will be given to a student whose research paper is recognized for excellence in the field of telecommunications.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2005 | By Harold Brubaker INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
U.S. food manufacturers have long opposed labeling foods that contain genetically modified ingredients. They fear that consumers would interpret the label as a warning. That fear is well-founded, according to a paper being presented today at a St. Joseph's University conference on global perceptions of biotechnology. After meetings with focus groups, researchers at St. Joseph's and Rutgers University concluded that many consumers would avoid buying products if they knew they contained genetically engineered ingredients.
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