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BUSINESS
January 13, 2016
Scholars, shareholders, the newly separated, and the long-frustrated have plenty to say about cuts to the central research and business units at DuPont Co. by new CEO Edward Breen . Some highlights: "DuPont struggled with return on R&D over the years," notes Ben duPont , a shareholder and past manager at the chemical giant that bears his ancestor's name. "For 40 years, like a drumbeat, every few years DuPont introduced a new blockbuster product - nylon, Teflon, Tyvek, Delrin, Kevlar, Lycra, Kapton, Neoprene, Mylar . " (They weren't all blockbusters; duPont still has a pair of Corfam shoes - the Edsel of leather.)
NEWS
November 30, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
A week after 22-year-old Nicholas Peter Zizzamia disappeared from his Cherry Hill home May 12, 1979, the body of a young man of similar build and appearance was found 580 miles away in a Richmond, Ind., motel room. The city's Palladium-Item newspaper reported that the man had apparently slashed his right wrist and bled to death watching TV. Authorities did not find a driver's license or other identification in the room, for which the deceased had anonymously paid $13.52 in cash the day before.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Solar panels accounted for one-third of all new electricity generation installed in the United States in 2014, up from just 10 percent two years earlier. With interest expected to keep rising, many research groups are on the hunt for ways to boost efficiency. Among them is a team at the University of Delaware, which is developing materials to harness portions of the sun's spectrum that in today's conventional solar panels are largely wasted. The key is a property of a panel's semiconductor material called the band gap, an electronic hurdle of sorts.
NEWS
November 19, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When it comes to a still-mysterious condition known as Castleman disease, David Fajgenbaum, a professor of hematology/oncology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, is more than an advocate or a physician/scientist: He is also a patient. Addressing a team of volunteers for the Castleman Disease Collaborative Network (CDCN), Fajgenbaum quickly details on a white board what is known about CD, a group of poorly understood inflammatory disorders that can vary from a single enlarged lymph node to life-threatening multiple organ failure.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Tuesday tapped a new state treasurer, filling one of several vacancies that opened in his cabinet after several officials left the administration in recent months. Ford M. Scudder, chief operating officer of Nashville-based Laffer Associates, will begin as treasurer next month, the governor's office said. He replaces Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff, who left in July. Scudder is also a senior research analyst at Laffer Investments, an investment management firm. The company's founder, Arthur Laffer, who also founded the economic research and consulting firm Laffer Associates, was a key economic adviser to President Ronald Reagan, and is often called the father of supply-side economics - a theory that elevates the role of lowering taxes over government spending in stimulating economic growth.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Grice, a University of Pennsylvania assistant professor, embodies the new way that academia and drug companies collaborate on research to generate cash for schools and profitable medicines for manufacturers. Grice, like many researchers, gets most of her funding from government agencies such as the National Institutes of Health and foundations. Like some, she also is doing work for a for-profit pharmaceutical company - in her case, Janssen Pharmaceuticals. What's changed in recent years is the nature of that academic-industry relationship.
NEWS
October 11, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're now luminaries of medical textbooks, but in the 1980s, Paul Offit and Fred Clark were in a Philadelphia lab, elbow-deep in stool samples collected from calves with diarrhea. They were on a mission to develop a vaccine for rotavirus, a deadly disease that filled the hospital beds of pediatric wards, claiming many lives. Without a vaccine, in the first five years of life, four in five children would have symptoms of a viral infection, one in seven would wind up in the ER, and one in 200,000 would die from the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Axalta Coating Systems has selected the Navy Yard as the site of a new international research-and-development hub, drawn by the campus' open green spaces, its existing name-brand tenants, and a generous helping of public funds. The 175,000-square-foot research and development center at the sprawling South Philadelphia site will replace a facility in Wilmington, Axalta chief executive Charles Shaver said Wednesday at a news conference. When fully operational in 2018, the $70 million project will have drawn at least 190 employees north to Philadelphia, according to the company, which makes specialty paint and coatings for the automotive and other industries.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Lewis Schotland, 84, of Wynnewood, an internationally known researcher into muscle disorders and for 38 years a leading figure in the University of Pennsylvania's neurology department, died Thursday, Aug. 13, of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Schotland's career as an MD spanned almost 50 years. He arrived at Penn in 1967, rising through the ranks to become professor of neurology and, later, professor emeritus. He closed his lab in 1998 and retired from clinical practice in 2005.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
FRC censures Josh Duggar The conservative Christian lobbying org that once employed Josh Duggar has sent a letter excoriating the reality star of now-canceled 19 Kids and Counting after he admitted he had cheated on wife Anna . "We are grieved by Josh's conduct. . . . His deceitful behavior harms his family, his friends . . . and the cause he has publicly espoused," writes Family Research Council prez Tony Perkins . "Josh's failures serve as a painful reminder of the destructive effects of not living with integrity.
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