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NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Score a big hit - and a tip of the yarmulke - for persistent sleuthing to Mary O'Connor Ward-Donegan, 87, of Ridley Park, the youngest sister of Cardinal John J. O'Connor, the dynamic former Catholic archbishop of New York. Ward-Donegan used the family-tree tracing service Ancestry.com - and her own dogged research - to unearth a fact even her now-deceased brother apparently never knew: Their mother was born Jewish. Hebraic law holds that any child born of a Jewish mother is a Jew. That means O'Connor, an influential prelate who for six years led the nation's second-largest archdiocese, could be considered one, too. "I think it might interest some people to look into their own roots.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University is investigating an ethics complaint that two of its professors did not properly disclose funding from the private prison industry for their research on the cost of incarceration. Simon Hakim and Erwin Blackstone, economists on Temple's faculty since the mid-1970s, argued that they had been doing similar research for decades and always disclosed their funding when their work was completed. They said sometimes their research favors the funder and sometimes it does not. In this case, it did. The professors concluded that private prisons save money while performing as well as or better than government-operated prisons and generate much-needed competition.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Army Pvt. Ed Gondolf was killed in fighting outside Lemberg, France, during World War II, his family in Camden wasn't told much about what happened. But they never gave up trying to find out. Relatives gathered information on their own over the years, then Gondolf's niece Lynne Gill asked a military casualty researcher to help and was stunned by the results. Gill received more than 300 pages of documents that laid out her uncle's service, provided details of his last day - and stirred in Gondolf's surviving brother and other relatives feelings of pride.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marye H. Godinez, 68, of Bryn Mawr, a medical researcher and mother of six, died of lung cancer Thursday, May 29, at her home. Dr. Godinez, an early multitasker, pursued a passion for medical research on the biochemical nature of the lung while raising her children in Bryn Mawr. Son Paul said Dr. Godinez was a master at finding the balance between work and family. At one point, she told her children it was time for them to take on some of the responsibilities of running a home.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two young girls arrived at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia 11 years apart with the same kind of cancer. One, 4-year-old Edie Gilger, lived to see her tumors shrink because of an innovative new drug therapy. Edie is in complete remission. For that, she can thank the other girl, Alexandra Scott. Ten years ago this month, Alex, weakened from cancer, sold lemonade for the last time at her Wynnewood elementary school. Lemonade stands were her way to raise money for doctors "to help other kids, like they helped me. " By the time Alex died that August, the Lower Merion Township girl had raised nearly $1 million and set in motion what would become an international effort.
SPORTS
May 21, 2014 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Until four years ago, medical professionals across Major League Baseball were not speaking the same language. The league finally installed an injury surveillance system, and in 2011 Michael Ciccotti was appointed to lead an elbow study group under baseball's medical advisory committee. Ciccotti, the Phillies' head team physician and director of sports medicine at the Rothman Institute, initiated research on the ulnar collateral ligament, now the most-discussed tissue in baseball.
NEWS
April 20, 2014 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
Sometimes, it takes one angry accountant to get things done. Doctors have been aware of anosmia - the inability to smell - "as far as I know, forever," says Gary Beauchamp, director of the Monell Chemical Senses Center in West Philadelphia. But they've never been able to do much about it. Monell scientists are working to change that. In February, they began a campaign to find a treatment for anosmia. And the campaign was spurred, in large part, by a letter Beauchamp received from one fed-up, anosmic accountant about a year ago. "He had lost his sense of smell.
NEWS
March 24, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
When Denise Savarese, 60, of Sicklerville learned that she had a progressive form of multiple sclerosis in 1992, she feared breaking the news to her mother. Yet before she could, her mother pointed to herself and said, "I heard you have this. " She could not bear to say out loud that her daughter shared the MS that had severely limited her own life. But given major advances in MS care over the last 20 years, Savarese's path would differ greatly from her mother's. In 1993, Savarese was put on the first injectable drug for MS, betaseron, a form of interferon that can prevent flare-ups.
NEWS
March 20, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
GLASSBORO Rowan University announced Tuesday that it had entered an agreement with Lockheed Martin to have the company collaborate with the university's students and faculty on research and development of radar technology. The move builds on a project begun last fall and, Rowan administrators said, is a new model for universities working with industry. The school has made high-profile pledges to expand, especially its research enterprise, with the engineering school seen as a core part of that mission.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
HARRISBURG The Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape (PCAR) on Wednesday awarded its annual Vision of Hope grant to Chiara Sabina to assess the current knowledge and attitudes of Pennsylvanians regarding child sexual abuse. Sabina, an assistant professor of social sciences at Penn State Harrisburg, is also an independent researcher of interpersonal violence, particularly sexual assault, intimate partner violence, and teen dating violence. PCAR grants up to $50,000 each year from its Vision of Hope Fund to support prevention projects in Pennsylvania and across the country to help teach adults how to create safer environments for children.
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