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NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You wouldn't buy a car without negotiating, would you? Health care is the same now. Feb. 15 is the last day to sign up for a health-insurance policy and avoid a tax penalty to Uncle Sam that could total 2 percent of your income. If you don't have coverage, today's the day. If you have insurance, there are ways to save money on your medical bills. Because, let's face it, even the new insurance isn't that affordable. Silver and bronze plans under the Affordable Care Act carry median family deductibles of roughly $2,500 and $5,100, respectively, according to data from management-consulting firm McKinsey & Co. As health-care costs shift to consumers, we need to negotiate services at fair prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
NEW YORK - John Oliver began his HBO show last spring without much of a plan. And as "Last Week Tonight" returns at 11 p.m. Sunday, he's sticking with it. "I wouldn't really credit us with much thought or strategy," Oliver said of his satirical news show, which quickly won attention for its deep dives into topics as diverse - and unexpectedly entertaining - as net neutrality, the Miss America pageant and FIFA, the governing body for...
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Jackson, 81, and his partner of more than 40 years, Myrna Roach, 74, are the kind of older people many of us would like to be one day. Both still work and are energetic enough to travel extensively. They take medicine for high blood pressure and he has diabetes, but they feel healthy. They like to join clinical trials and know from one that their mental abilities have been stable for years. Still, Roach has a strong family history of Alzheimer's disease. Jackson doesn't, but Alzheimer's is the disease he dreads above all others.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO will let a Florida king snake crawl through one sleeve of his robe and out the other is a man to be reckoned with. And then there was the iguana that had free rein of his home in Wayne and later Berwyn. In fact, the king snake had free rein, too, until his wife put her foot down. It is now in a tank. But Joel M. Kauffman was a man to be reckoned with for many other reasons, as well. A prominent chemist, researcher and medical writer, he would receive several hundred emails daily from people who just wanted to pick his brain.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
From beautiful office space in Radnor, Manuel Brocke-Benz, 56, heads an 8,700-employee, $4.4 billion company that's a market leader in its field. Ever heard of VWR International L.L.C.? "We are a little hidden," acknowledged Brocke-Benz, "And there's nothing wrong with that, to be very frank, because I know our potential customers and suppliers, and they all know us. " VWR essentially supplies labs - mostly with equipment, but also with people and services. On the equipment side, it distributes equipment made by others; customers know that VWR chooses its vendors carefully.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Perhaps you already gave money or charitable gifts in 2014 - or you plan to before year's end. Either way, here are helpful tips in setting up a vehicle for your gift and documenting your donation. First: Keep all paperwork and photos, or face the wrath of the Tax Man. Second: Do your homework on the charity of your choice. Third: Don't wait until the last day of the year. Your gift needs to be in the hands of your chosen charity by December 31 in order for you to reap the tax deduction; donating stocks and bonds, for instances, can take three days to settle.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. co-founder and philanthropist Paul G. Allen is giving $100 million to establish the Allen Institute for Cell Science in Seattle. The donation was announced Monday in Philadelphia at the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology. Allen's new nonprofit group will focus on the relationship between human genetic information, cell development, and cell behavior. The goal, Allen said in a news release, is to create a "comprehensive, predictive model of the cell.
NEWS
December 7, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
For decades, researchers have been seeking a blood test that could diagnose a concussion and tell whether it is severe enough to cause lasting brain damage. In a big step toward that holy grail, University of Pennsylvania scientists have found that a blood protein called SNTF surged and stayed elevated in professional hockey players with persistent concussion symptoms, but not in players who recovered within a few days. "These results show that SNTF has promise as a blood biomarker for sports-related concussion," said Robert Siman, a research professor of neurosurgery at Penn and lead author of the study in last month's Journal of Neurotrauma.
NEWS
December 4, 2014 | By Marcus Biddle, Inquirer Staff Writer
Howard Holtzer, 92, of West Philadelphia, a longtime professor and researcher in cell and developmental biology at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, died Wednesday, Nov. 5, at his home. Dr. Holtzer remained active in his research at Penn until a few years before his death. He is survived by his wife and research collaborator of 64 years, Sybil Holtzer. His research into the ways cells communicate was described as groundbreaking. "While doing research in the laboratory of Dr. Paul Weiss in Chicago, he did his first extraordinary experiments and made observations that historically are the foundation of much of the molecular work on inductive signals between tissues and how cells communicate during development," said Bernice J. Koplin, his estate lawyer.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
So far, the search for a treatment that will save our oldest generation from the scourge of Alzheimer's disease has been a long, frustrating slog. Paul Aisen, an Alzheimer's expert from the University of California, San Diego, explained why. For decades, researchers were dealing with a deadly disease that had no apparent symptoms for the first 15 years or so. When the symptoms started, they were not specific to Alzheimer's. By the time they got bad, the brain was already severely damaged.
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