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NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Gov. Christie on Tuesday tapped a new state treasurer, filling one of several vacancies that opened in his cabinet after several officials left the administration in recent months. Ford M. Scudder, chief operating officer of Nashville-based Laffer Associates, will begin as treasurer next month, the governor's office said. He replaces Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff, who left in July. Scudder is also a senior research analyst at Laffer Investments, an investment management firm. The company's founder, Arthur Laffer, who also founded the economic research and consulting firm Laffer Associates, was a key economic adviser to President Ronald Reagan, and is often called the father of supply-side economics - a theory that elevates the role of lowering taxes over government spending in stimulating economic growth.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elizabeth Grice, a University of Pennsylvania assistant professor, embodies the new way that academia and drug companies collaborate on research to generate cash for schools and profitable medicines for manufacturers. Grice, like many researchers, gets most of her funding from government agencies such as the National Institutes of Health and foundations. Like some, she also is doing work for a for-profit pharmaceutical company - in her case, Janssen Pharmaceuticals. What's changed in recent years is the nature of that academic-industry relationship.
NEWS
October 11, 2015 | By Sheena Faherty, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're now luminaries of medical textbooks, but in the 1980s, Paul Offit and Fred Clark were in a Philadelphia lab, elbow-deep in stool samples collected from calves with diarrhea. They were on a mission to develop a vaccine for rotavirus, a deadly disease that filled the hospital beds of pediatric wards, claiming many lives. Without a vaccine, in the first five years of life, four in five children would have symptoms of a viral infection, one in seven would wind up in the ER, and one in 200,000 would die from the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Axalta Coating Systems has selected the Navy Yard as the site of a new international research-and-development hub, drawn by the campus' open green spaces, its existing name-brand tenants, and a generous helping of public funds. The 175,000-square-foot research and development center at the sprawling South Philadelphia site will replace a facility in Wilmington, Axalta chief executive Charles Shaver said Wednesday at a news conference. When fully operational in 2018, the $70 million project will have drawn at least 190 employees north to Philadelphia, according to the company, which makes specialty paint and coatings for the automotive and other industries.
NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Lewis Schotland, 84, of Wynnewood, an internationally known researcher into muscle disorders and for 38 years a leading figure in the University of Pennsylvania's neurology department, died Thursday, Aug. 13, of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Schotland's career as an MD spanned almost 50 years. He arrived at Penn in 1967, rising through the ranks to become professor of neurology and, later, professor emeritus. He closed his lab in 1998 and retired from clinical practice in 2005.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
FRC censures Josh Duggar The conservative Christian lobbying org that once employed Josh Duggar has sent a letter excoriating the reality star of now-canceled 19 Kids and Counting after he admitted he had cheated on wife Anna . "We are grieved by Josh's conduct. . . . His deceitful behavior harms his family, his friends . . . and the cause he has publicly espoused," writes Family Research Council prez Tony Perkins . "Josh's failures serve as a painful reminder of the destructive effects of not living with integrity.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOSEPH TERRANCE Heard had this dream. He would start a program for boys who have had discipline problems at school and encourage them to chase the same dream that led him to a successful career in science. It was part of Joe's lifelong commitment to encourage others to follow his path, which took him from a childhood of poverty in Philadelphia public housing to a fulfilling career in mathematics and science research. His brother, Justin, said Joe spent his "time and efforts mentoring many of the youth of our community trying to light the spark of knowledge and education wherever he could.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Planned Parenthood is under attack by antiabortion activists over secretly recorded videos showing its executives candidly talking about supplying fetal tissue for medical research. This abortion-related controversy is providing grist for the many Republican presidential candidates hitting the trail. But it is also reviving public interest in fetal tissue research, which has yielded advances that have saved the lives of countless babies. Consider rubella. During a U.S. epidemic in the mid-1960s, an estimated 31,000 pregnant women infected with the virus suffered stillbirths, gave birth to severely disabled infants, or decided to end their pregnancies.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new diabetes research project aims to develop medicines by marrying chemistry expertise from Rowan University with animal physiology knowledge at Rutgers-Camden. Researchers at Rowan have begun work on some promising medicines, while Rutgers-Camden professors hope to examine plant-based folk medicines from Africa. Rowan scholars have the background to explore the mechanisms behind the medicines, while Rutgers-Camden will focus on testing them on diabetic mice. "We need each other, because the people at Rowan are unable to test the results of their medicines on the physiology," said Joseph V. Martin, a biology professor and associate dean at Rutgers-Camden, who is one of the primary researchers on the project.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dr. Marvin E. Jaffe joined the former Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in 1970, son Jonathan said, he hit his stride. "During his career at Merck," his son wrote in an appreciation of his father, "he was responsible for bringing a number of first-in-class drugs" to market, such as Sinemet for Parkinson's disease and Mevacor for cholesterol treatment. And referring to the joint venture with the firm AB Astra, his son said, Dr. Jaffe "had an integral role in the Astra-Merck alliance, which resulted in the development" of the heartburn drug Prilosec.
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