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NEWS
November 19, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
The March of Dimes Foundation and the University of Pennsylvania announced a joint research effort Monday to find some of the causes of premature birth, in the hope that doctors can prevent more infants from being born early. Premature birth is the leading cause of death among newborns, and can also cause lifelong health issues, such as respiratory or organ problems, cerebral palsy, infections, developmental or learning disabilities, and behavioral problems. One in nine U.S. babies is born prematurely - before 37 weeks; in Philadelphia the figure is one in eight.
NEWS
November 4, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Calvin J. Dooley, 89, of Absecon, N.J., a former research physicist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture office in Wyndmoor, died of kidney failure Friday, Oct. 31, at home. Born in Newport News, Va., Mr. Dooley graduated from Lumberton High School and became a fireman on the Pennsylvania Railroad, shoveling coal on steam engines. He was a Navy machinist's mate on a destroyer and a destroyer tender in the South Pacific during World War II. Mr. Dooley was a lineman in the 1946 season for the semiprofessional football team the Gloucester City Mustangs, while being assigned jobs out of a hiring hall for a local of the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, a nephew, Charles Huber, said.
NEWS
October 28, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Many Americans view the poor as a permanent underclass of slackers who dodge work and skate through life on the taxpayer's dime. But recent research shows the poor are anything but monolithic. And poverty is a lot more common experience than people think. More than 40 percent of Americans between ages 25 and 60 will be poor for at least a year, said Mark Rank, a professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis. "It's not that people aren't working hard or trying," Rank said.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like many 11-year-olds, Morgan Laufgraben of Cherry Hill enjoys playing soccer. She is a member of a travel team, the Blades. Morgan's parents, however, unlike other spectators in the stands, are eager not only to watch the team score goals but also to hear their daughter's insulin levels shouted out by the coaches during game breaks. The Beck Middle School sixth-grader was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2012. Through her meal planning and frequent insulin checks for a disease that is currently incurable, Morgan's family said she had maintained a positive outlook.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edgewater Park Township has agreed to pay $1,900 in legal fees incurred by a paid political researcher who sued over a delayed open-records request. Jim Logue, a Medford resident who works for the Burlington County Republican Committee, requested 15 years of public records - 21,500 pages - and filed suit when the township failed to provide them within 14 days. Looking for information on Edgewater Park Mayor Tom Pullion, a Democrat running this fall for the Burlington County Board of Freeholders, Logue asked for electronic copies of meeting minutes, ordinances, resolutions, bills, permits, cellphone records, payroll, property taxes, and grant applications, among other documents dating to 1999, when Pullion was first elected to the council.
NEWS
October 12, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania professor who studies psychopaths has found hope for improving human behavior in a surprising place: fish oil. A new study led by Adrian Raine, a psychologist in Penn's criminology department, found giving children a fruit drink mixed with omega-3 fatty acids - a key ingredient in fish oil - improved their behavior. Strangely, the behavior of parents also improved, even though they weren't taking the supplements. More on that later. Raine's ultimate goal is ambitious: to reduce crime.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research is suing a Camden nonprofit, saying it compromised nearly 26,000 research tubes when a freezer door was left open in March. The tubes of blood and other fluids were stored at the Coriell Institute for Medical Research along Haddon Avenue, and would have been used to study the causes of Parkinson's disease, according to the lawsuit. It was filed Friday in U.S. District Court in New Jersey. Fox's foundation, according to the suit, signed two contracts - one in 2010, the other 2011 - worth a combined $4.3 million to store the tubes at Coriell.
NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bleach-white laboratory on the fifth floor of an austere building at Thomas Jefferson University, Matthias J. Schnell plays with biological grenades. Schnell is a microbiologist who specializes in filoviruses - the microorganisms that cause hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola. For more than a decade, he has been working on vaccines to prevent the kind of tragedy now ravaging thousands of people in West Africa. "Filovirus research was a very unimportant field," said Schnell, director of the Jefferson Vaccine Center.
NEWS
October 3, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUDY Spitzer suffered through two great upheavals in her life, one caused by human venality and the other by nature. As a teenager, she was caught up in the Holocaust, but managed through guts and ingenuity to escape the Nazis, who murdered her father and other family members. Then, 70 years later, Hurricane Katrina drove her and her husband out of New Orleans, where they were teaching at a medical school. Finally settling in the relative peace of the Philadelphia area, Judy could look back on a life of accomplishment realized in the toils of catastrophes that might have wrecked less fearless souls.
NEWS
September 18, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Are you sure you have the right person?" Danielle S. Bassett asked. The University of Pennsylvania brain researcher is just 32, one year into her first faculty position. So when the MacArthur Foundation people called her last week, Bassett figured they were planning to award one of their coveted $625,000 grants to an older colleague, and wanted to ask her opinion. No, they wanted Bassett. The foundation named her and 20 others Wednesday as the winners of its annual fellowships, informally dubbed the "genius grants" by the media in 1981, the first year they were awarded.
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