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NEWS
August 23, 2014 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
The woman accused of sexually assaulting a 5-year-old girl last year after abducting her from a West Philadelphia elementary school researched child sex crimes on her personal computer, a city prosecutor disclosed Thursday. The new allegations about Christina Regusters, 21, were detailed by Assistant District Attorney Erin O'Brien in a pretrial-motions hearing before Philadelphia Common Pleas Court Judge Jeffrey P. Minehart. Minehart permitted O'Brien to use the evidence at trial over the objections of defense lawyer W. Fred Harrison Jr. Also Thursday, the judge and lawyers completed jury selection with two final alternate jurors.
NEWS
August 14, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
A study that said more money has not helped city schools is flawed and presents a skewed picture of the Philadelphia School District's reality, a local nonprofit says. The conservative Commonwealth Foundation said in an analysis released earlier this month that while the system's budget had grown over the past decade, its students were still struggling, and that "serious reform" was needed to fix the city's schools. But Research for Action, a Philadelphia-based organization whose mission is to strengthen public schools, found the Commonwealth Foundation brief "misleading, inaccurate, and devoid of context needed for an informed understanding of what is happening in the city's schools.
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
On a state-funded trip to Denver last week, Pennsylvania State Sen. Daylin Leach aimed to study every aspect of Colorado's legal marijuana industry. Even the customer side. After touring growers and processors, visiting dispensaries, and talking with the National Conference of State Legislatures, Leach said, he returned to his hotel room and took two marijuana hits off a vaporizer pen. The Montgomery County Democrat has cosponsored a bill to legalize medical marijuana, and said he was optimistic that it will pass in September.
NEWS
July 31, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day - maybe not any day - that scientists disclose their religion and method of circumcision in an academic paper. But that's what University of Pennsylvania researchers Brian Leas and Craig Umscheid did in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. Their topic was the spread of infection through the use of "direct oral suction" during a rare type of Jewish circumcision. Leas and Umscheid found 30 reported cases - two of them fatal - of the spread of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central question in the debate over a Rutgers University-led study of the ocean floor off the coast of Long Beach Island is whether the loud sound waves used to map the sediment will harm dolphins, whales, and other animals. It is an area of scientific research that has been getting more attention since the mid-1990s, when researchers generated loud sounds in the Pacific Ocean to study the effect of water temperature on sound. People began to wonder whether marine mammals could hear the sound and, if so, if that was bad. Since then, scientists have trained some of the more intelligent species, such as dolphins, to tap a paddle when they hear a sound.
NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Loucks Rogers, 92, formerly of Norwood, Delaware County, a retired research chemist, died Thursday, July 10, of heart failure at Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne, Ind. He had lived at Peabody Retirement Center in North Manchester, Ind., since 2009. In 1996, he moved to Indiana to be near family. Born in Wilkinsburg, Pa., he lived in Pittsburgh until he was 9, when he moved to the Loucks family homestead and dairy farm in Scottdale, Pa. It was while working in the dairy that Mr. Rogers' lifelong interest in science was kindled.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University researchers have used state-of-the-art molecular scissors to cut out dormant HIV hiding in human cells, fueling hopes for curing - not just suppressing - the insidious infection that causes AIDS. The HIV removal experiment was conducted in cells in the lab, and the scissors did not work on every cell, so the approach is a long way from use in the clinic. Still, the study, published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows how new genetic editing technologies could be harnessed to conquer the AIDS virus.
NEWS
July 20, 2014 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The AIDS community mourned the loss of one of its top researchers and advocates in the jet crash in Ukraine, a "humanist" whose life - and death - reminded some of the death of another leading AIDS scientist, from Philadelphia, in a plane crash 16 years ago. Six delegates to the 20th International AIDS Conference - down from initial reports of 100 - were confirmed to have been on the plane, shot down en route from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia....
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two new prostate cancer studies have found that many low-risk patients have been receiving more treatment than is needed or helpful - racking up millions of dollars in excess health-care costs and, potentially, causing more physical harm than good. One of the studies, both of which were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, showed that among patients whose cancer was not aggressive, those who received hormone therapy as their primary treatment did not live any longer than those who were merely carefully monitored.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert J. Stunkard, 92, a renowned pioneer in the research and treatment of obesity and eating disorders, died Saturday at his home in Bryn Mawr. Dr. Stunkard died suddenly after recovering from a recent bout of pneumonia, said his wife, Margaret S. Maurin. A professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, Dr. Stunkard, known as Mickey, was a passionate and obsessive researcher. He worked at his office at Penn until he was 90, said his wife.
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