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BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Philly should be throwing a parade for Scott Kesterson, or at least buying him a snort of his favorite bourbon, Michter's. It's not every day that a small business moves across the country to Philadelphia. Even more rare is when the owner of that business has no personal ties here. "I never thought I'd be a Northeast guy," said the native of southern Oregon. Research is what led Kesterson, 51, to relocate his Spatial Terra, a four-year-old company specializing in a complex blend of market research, risk-mitigation analysis, and consulting, from Portland - a city often associated with progressiveness - to Philadelphia - a city that consistently does not score well in national rankings of best places for small business.
REAL_ESTATE
March 28, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
I would be remiss if I didn't take some time to talk about the annual Better Homes and Gardens survey of consumers' attitudes about their homes. The results come from brand executive editor Jill Waage, who reports on the surveys at the National Association of Home Builders shows every January in places much warmer than Philadelphia. The latest research focused on the millennial generation and its preferences regarding customization and smart technology in home design. In October 2015, more than 1,600 U.S. female owners of single-family homes shared their thoughts on home-improvement spending, the importance of functional design, and value in home technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, STAFF WRITER
Temple University researchers used a gene-editing technique to remove HIV DNA from the type of human immune cells where the virus can maintain a simmering reservoir of infection. The experiment, building on the researchers' previous HIV gene-editing work, was conducted in T cells growing in lab dishes. Whether it works in actual patients remains to be seen. Still, the study bolsters the concept that HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, can be cured, not just controlled in a latent stage by antiviral drugs.
NEWS
March 19, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Stanley S. Spiegel was about to open his firm, his wife, Sheila, said, he decided to name it as an engineer might. The firm, Esscube Engineering, used his initials - SSS - and for folks like him, she said, "three means a cube. " And so, in naming the firm, as in other matters, "he thought everything in mathematical terms. " On Friday, March 4, Mr. Spiegel, 83, of Marlton, former president of the research firm, based in Haddonfield and then in Southampton, Bucks County, died of kidney failure at his home.
NEWS
March 2, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Research options for gifted students According to the letter, "Funds for charters" (Feb. 22), "Like regular school districts, charter schools have individualized education programs for gifted students . . . . " Charter schools are exempt from Pennsylvania's regulations for gifted education. While public school districts are required to identify and meet the needs of gifted students through Gifted Individualized Education Plans, charter and private schools may assist - or ignore - gifted students.
NEWS
February 26, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors alleged Wednesday that corrupt officials in the Chinese government financially supported and may have benefited from a scheme to steal trade secrets worth billions from a GlaxoSmithKline research facility in Montgomery County. But lawyers representing one of the five defendants accused of pilfering information from the British-based pharmaceutical giant's Upper Merion Township location called such claims a "fantastical assertion. " The dispute - which boiled over at a detention hearing in federal court in Philadelphia - struck at the heart of debate over the Justice Department's recent checkered history in prosecuting cases of alleged theft of trade secrets involving Chinese American scientists.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Wills Eye Hospital, which said last month that it is trying to raise $30 million for a new research and medical-care facility, on Monday announced the hiring of Leslie G. Hyman to spearhead the expansion of the hospital's research program. Hyman, currently a head of the epidemiology faculty and professor at Stony Brook University Medical Center in Stony Brook, New York, is scheduled to start at Wills this summer, Will said. In addition to the job at Wills, she will hold the Thomas D. Duane Endowed Chair in the Department of Ophthalmology at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and will become co-director of the Wills Vision Research Center at Jefferson.
NEWS
February 8, 2016 | By Marie McCullough, Staff Writer
Most experts say colon cancer is a multistage disease driven by the accumulation of genetic mutations. Not Scott A. Waldman. The Thomas Jefferson University researcher has spent decades bolstering the iconoclastic idea that colon cancer is basically a hormone-deficiency disease - one that can be reversed or even prevented by restoring the hormone. Now, Waldman's team has also linked that hormone, called guanylin, to obesity, offering a clue to why obese people are at increased risk of colon cancer.
NEWS
January 30, 2016
By Mary Woolley and Robert L. Bixby In passing a spending bill for 2016, Congress seemed to acknowledge that medical research had been cut too deeply for over a decade and agreed to boost funding for it in the coming months. But without reforms to address the basic structural problems in the federal budget, downward pressures on research and other important national priorities can be expected to continue. Consider what's at stake: Cutting-edge immunotherapy work at Penn Medicine's Abramson Cancer Center to help achieve the goals of the "moonshot" initiative to cure cancer.
SPORTS
January 30, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
Matt Klentak, in his first winter at the head of a baseball operations department, wanted to learn how companies manage information. The 35-year-old Phillies general manager surveyed people in baseball, other sports, and some with zero connections to the game. How, he asked, do you implement analytics into decisions? Those talks led him to Andy Galdi, a 30-year-old Google employee who was hired Thursday as the Phillies' first-ever director of baseball research and development. "He's the perfect guy to help grow us forward in this area," Klentak said.
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