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NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Editor's note: This is the first in an occasional series about key people and discoveries at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, this year marking its 250th anniversary.   Fifty years ago, most scientists dismissed the idea that cancer could be seeded by the same kind of germ as colds and the flu. Not Gertrude and Werner Henle, husband-and-wife virologists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins reminded biotech executives Wednesday in Philadelphia that the big money they hope to make from drugs, medical devices, and other health care technology often starts with the taxpayers. "NIH is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the world," Collins told a packed conference room at the BIO International 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. He then cautioned them about the political and economic realities of America.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 50 years after the Epstein-Barr virus was discovered to cause human cancers, there are no good treatment options for the 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually, most of them in the world's poorest places. The Wistar Institute aims to change that. The illustrious Philadelphia research center last month received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust in London to continue developing a novel anti-viral drug. "We certainly hope that this first-in-class drug we are developing will slow the progression or - even better - cure these deadly cancers," said Wistar senior scientist Troy Messick.
NEWS
June 12, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
The small shorebird - a ruddy turnstone - was not happy. Moments ago, it had been feasting on horseshoe crab eggs along the waterline of Delaware Bay near Villas, N.J. But now, University of Georgia researcher Deb Carter had a gentle but inescapable grip on the bird, and her colleague Clara Kienzle was sticking a cotton swab down its throat. Next, they swabbed the bird's other end and then jabbed a slim needle into a vein to draw blood before releasing it. Their goal: to see if this healthy bird was carrying a flu virus.
NEWS
June 4, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
SEEMA S. SONNAD was passionate about her researches in the health services field, but she had another passion, running. She was one of those runners who think mere marathons (26.2 miles) are not challenging enough. They go for the big distances. It was while running an ultramarathon in Washington State on May 27 that Seema suffered a cardiac arrhythmia. She died in Valley Medical Center in Renton, Wash. She was 52 and had homes in West Philadelphia and Chadds Ford. Seema S. Sonnad was director of Health Services Research for the Value Institute at Christiana Care Health System in Wilmington, Del., a position to which she was appointed in October 2012.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Russell Turner, 103, of Ardmore, a senior research scientist at the Atlantic Richfield Co. from 1940 to 1971 and a member of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange from 1971 to 1994, died Wednesday, May 20, of respiratory failure at home. Mr. Turner was born in the coal region of Schuylkill County. His father died when he was 6, so he learned to find his way at an early age. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and was first employed by ARCO as an operator in the cracking department of a refinery, where petroleum crude is converted into gasoline and other products.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
May 6, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Wooden is a city resident and registered voter. Yet with two weeks until the mayoral primary election, Wooden has no idea who he is voting for. He is not alone. Like most of the dozen people interviewed during the lunch hour Monday at Dilworth Park, Wooden simply didn't know much about the candidates or even their names. Wooden said he has seen the television ads for a female candidate who said she would sue the state for not providing enough money for the schools.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kellie Woll administered a few squirts of clear liquid to a dish full of wriggling tadpoles and within minutes, the creatures became completely still. A few minutes after that, they started to move again. No surprise, as the liquid contained propofol, a widely used anesthetic. With it and most other anesthetics, however, there is not much difference between the amount needed to put someone to sleep and the amount that will knock one out permanently. Woll works in the University of Pennsylvania lab of Roderic G. Eckenhoff, who is on a long-term quest for better alternatives.
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