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NEWS
December 15, 2013 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Losing weight may be a matter not only of what you eat, but when you eat. Evidence is mounting that abnormally timed meals - those consumed in conflict with the normal three meals a day - may result in gaining fat. In a study this year in the International Journal of Obesity, researchers found participants in a weight-loss program who ate earlier in the day lost significantly more weight. The observational study followed 420 individuals who adhered to a 20-week weight-loss program in Spain.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nicholas C. Montegna, 93, of Cherry Hill, a chemical company research director who grew exotic azaleas as a hobby, died of heart failure Friday, Nov. 29, at home. Mr. Montegna grew up in an Italian neighborhood in Germantown and in later years enjoyed reunions with childhood friends, son Nicholas said. After graduating from Northeast Catholic High School, Mr. Montegna worked for Rohm & Haas Co. in Philadelphia. During World War II, he served in the Army and was commissioned a first lieutenant at 21. He was deployed to southern England, where he was an administrator in an Army hospital.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Meeri Kim, For The Inquirer
Being just a kid himself, 7-year-old Sam Hornikel isn't concerned about his ability to have children of his own yet. He's thinking more about the soccer game he missed, or his math homework. But researchers around the world are working to give boys like Sam - who fought off cancer when he was only 3 years old - the opportunity to have their own family one day. Often, chemotherapy or radiation treatments can harm fertility. Typically, older patients can bank sperm, but for those who haven't gone through puberty yet, researchers are deep-freezing tiny pieces of their testicular tissue.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
At least one investment research firm is calling for a correction in the stock market, and advising us to get ready to sell stocks. That gives us a chance to explain the difference between a "correction" and a "bear market" in equities. Corrections come in three sizes: small (3 percent to 5 percent), medium (5 percent to 10 percent), and bear market (more than 20 percent). "Small ones are hard to predict and rebound quickly," said Jean-Yves Dumont, of GaveKal Research, headquartered in New York.
NEWS
November 3, 2013 | By Reuben Kramer, For The Inquirer
It's a scene that might be repeated dozens of times on Drexel University's campus today: A student, sitting at a table, eating pizza. But Annie Feng is different. The sophomore nibbles on a mini pizza while wearing a headband designed to measure her brain activity. And unlike many brain-imaging machines, this device can be used at a table. By monitoring the brains of people during meals, researchers hope to learn about the cognitive aspects of eating, and why some people stop at a single slice while others devour the pie. This portable device has sparked the interest of researchers worldwide.
NEWS
November 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jeremy J. Fischer, 52, of Kimberton, who publicized his two-year battle with pancreatic cancer to help raise research funds and gracefully modeled how patients can live with cancer, died Sunday, Oct. 27, of the disease at his home. Mr. Fischer spoke on the air last year as part of the Stand Up to Cancer campaign supporting researchers here and across the country whose focus is hard-to-treat cancers. Before the report, Mr. Fischer's weight had dropped to 119 pounds, but he described his illness to CBS3 reporter Stephanie Stahl as "like a crouching tiger in a room.
NEWS
October 31, 2013 | BY JAD SLEIMAN, Daily News Staff Writer sleimaj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
YEARLY trick-or-treat safety guides urge parents to keenly scan each candy wrapper to spot signs of hidden poisons or razor blades. But has any kid ever actually been hurt or killed by a nefarious neighbor's ricin-laced Snickers? Joel Best, a University of Delaware sociology and criminal-justice professor, found that the candy-coated threat is about as likely as real vampires and witches going door-to-door each Oct. 31. He has studied newspaper articles going back 25 years, looking for the sensational tale of a child collapsing after eating a handful of poison Skittles.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Hurricane Sandy hit the Jersey Shore a year ago today, the wetlands-monitoring equipment of Tracy Quirk, an Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University researcher, was in its path. If the storm washed everything away, two years of painstaking work - not to mention hours of slogging through marsh muck in hip waders to install the devices - would be compromised. She'd have to start over to get continuous, long-term data. The equipment, it turned out, did more than survive.
NEWS
October 8, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert J. Miller, 63, of Elkins Park, who created the Office for Research and Planning in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and ran it for two decades, died Monday, Sept. 30, of cancer at Holy Redeemer Hospice. In 1990, Dr. Miller devised a system for the handling and collection of data about the archdiocese and drew up training documents so others could use it. It was a daunting task. The archdiocese had never had an official planning office, and the catchment area for data collection was huge, including parishes, schools, human service agencies, and other groups serving 1.4 million Catholics in the Philadelphia area.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Congress does not pass funding legislation and much of the federal government shuts down Tuesday, scientific research and drug approvals will be among the activities curtailed or halted. The Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, are among the agencies whose functions are funded each year through 12 bills passed by lawmakers in Washington. In 1995, when the last government shutdown occurred because of similar Republican-Democratic discord, Congress had already passed the legislation funding the FDA, so the agency continued to operate.
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