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NEWS
July 15, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albert J. Stunkard, 92, a renowned pioneer in the research and treatment of obesity and eating disorders, died Saturday at his home in Bryn Mawr. Dr. Stunkard died suddenly after recovering from a recent bout of pneumonia, said his wife, Margaret S. Maurin. A professor emeritus of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, Dr. Stunkard, known as Mickey, was a passionate and obsessive researcher. He worked at his office at Penn until he was 90, said his wife.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
The surgeon delivered the bad news on Elizabeth Koniz's lumpectomy: "We didn't get clean margins. " Stunned, she couldn't think of anything else. "The words rang in my head," said Koniz, a 48-year-old admissions coordinator at Temple University School of Medicine. "I had terrible anxiety. I was nervous at medical appointments. I had tremendous trouble sleeping and cried for weeks after the diagnosis. " About a third of cancer patients experience high levels of anxiety - intense distress, although not typically to the level of post-traumatic stress disorder - after getting the diagnosis or during a difficult moment in treatment.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Melinda H. Keefe shared the world's horror when a painting by Mark Rothko, one of her favorite artists, was defaced with graffiti. Along with her initial shock at the vandalism came another emotion: a determination to do something about it. Keefe, a senior research scientist at the Dow Chemical Co., volunteered her expertise in researching what solvents might work best at removing the vandal's ink. More than a year and a half later, the successfully...
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
New Jersey sought an injunction Thursday to halt research off the coast that the state says "could adversely impact" marine life and the state's tourism and fishing industries. The complaint, filed in U.S. District Court in Trenton, seeks to prevent a National Science Foundation-owned research vessel from conducting studies that would involve aiming loud pulses of sound deep into the ocean floor. Special acoustic equipment would capture the reflected sound waves and convert them into images that would allow scientists to discern sea-level changes from as long ago as 50 million years.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
David W. Taylor was eager to go bodysurfing with his son, Jonathan, but thought the waves at Cape May would be too tame for a good ride. Instead, he ended up getting a ride to the emergency room. Caught off-guard by a wave that hit him from behind that day in August 2007, the Lansdale resident suffered a broken neck - a type of injury that is all too familiar for physicians near New Jersey and Delaware beaches. In a single week in July 2012, for example, the AtlantiCare Regional Trauma Center in Atlantic City saw eight patients with spinal cord injuries sustained on the beach or in the water.
NEWS
June 15, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Welch, 92, of Springfield, Delaware County, a research chemist for the DuPont Co. who helped develop a rugged coating for pots and pans, died Wednesday, June 11, of pneumonia at Riddle Memorial Hospital. Early in his career, Mr. Welch worked in the company's paints and coatings division, based at Marshall Laboratories in Philadelphia. It was while working in Wilmington for the new product division in 1976 that he helped create Teflon II, SilverStone, a three-coat fluoropolymer application that made for a more durable finish on cookware than the nonstick coating Teflon, according to a company history.
NEWS
June 13, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Score a big hit - and a tip of the yarmulke - for persistent sleuthing to Mary O'Connor Ward-Donegan, 87, of Ridley Park, the youngest sister of Cardinal John J. O'Connor, the dynamic former Catholic archbishop of New York. Ward-Donegan used the family-tree tracing service Ancestry.com - and her own dogged research - to unearth a fact even her now-deceased brother apparently never knew: Their mother was born Jewish. Hebraic law holds that any child born of a Jewish mother is a Jew. That means O'Connor, an influential prelate who for six years led the nation's second-largest archdiocese, could be considered one, too. "I think it might interest some people to look into their own roots.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Army Pvt. Ed Gondolf was killed in fighting outside Lemberg, France, during World War II, his family in Camden wasn't told much about what happened. But they never gave up trying to find out. Relatives gathered information on their own over the years, then Gondolf's niece Lynne Gill asked a military casualty researcher to help and was stunned by the results. Gill received more than 300 pages of documents that laid out her uncle's service, provided details of his last day - and stirred in Gondolf's surviving brother and other relatives feelings of pride.
NEWS
June 10, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple University is investigating an ethics complaint that two of its professors did not properly disclose funding from the private prison industry for their research on the cost of incarceration. Simon Hakim and Erwin Blackstone, economists on Temple's faculty since the mid-1970s, argued that they had been doing similar research for decades and always disclosed their funding when their work was completed. They said sometimes their research favors the funder and sometimes it does not. In this case, it did. The professors concluded that private prisons save money while performing as well as or better than government-operated prisons and generate much-needed competition.
NEWS
June 5, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marye H. Godinez, 68, of Bryn Mawr, a medical researcher and mother of six, died of lung cancer Thursday, May 29, at her home. Dr. Godinez, an early multitasker, pursued a passion for medical research on the biochemical nature of the lung while raising her children in Bryn Mawr. Son Paul said Dr. Godinez was a master at finding the balance between work and family. At one point, she told her children it was time for them to take on some of the responsibilities of running a home.
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