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NEWS
July 27, 2013 | By Jim Salter, Associated Press
ST. LOUIS - Virginia Johnson, 88, the Missouri farm girl who helped redefine the understanding of human sexuality as half of the husband-wife team whose sex studies in the 1960s turned them into worldwide celebrities and best-selling authors, died Wednesday. The pioneering researcher, who was at an assisted-living facility in St. Louis, suffered complications from various illnesses, her son Scott Johnson told the Associated Press on Thursday. He said the family was planning a private funeral.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | BY TOM FERRICK, AxisPhilly.org
PHILADELPHIA is turning the corner on crime. The latest statistics show sharp decreases in almost every major offense, led by homicide, which is down 30 percent this year compared to the same period in 2012. It does not end there. The city has seen double-digit decreases in other major crimes, including robbery and auto theft, and smaller but significant declines in such crimes as aggravated assault and burglary. At the beginning of July, of the 14 types of major crimes that police track on a weekly basis, nine were at their lowest levels in the last five years.
NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert P. Perry, 82, of Churchville, Bucks County, a scientist whose early research helped unravel the mysteries of DNA, died Monday, July 15, at home of complications from neuropathy. Born in Chicago, he graduated from Northwestern University with a degree in mathematics in 1951 and earned his doctorate in biophysics at the University of Chicago in 1956. At the time, the helical structure of DNA had just been discovered. Dr. Perry devoted his career to studying how the structural and functional characteristics of living cells are determined by the information encoded in their genes.
NEWS
July 14, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thomas I. Haigh Jr., 76, of Holland, a research director at the Franklin Institute for 20 years, died Monday, July 8, of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at St. Mary Medical Center in Langhorne. He was a resident of Holland for the last 49 years. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Haigh was a 1954 graduate of Northeast High School and a 1968 graduate of Temple University with a bachelor's degree in physics. Mr. Haigh came from humble circumstances and believed in the importance of higher education.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Calling for more public money to be spent on scientific research, Newark Mayor Cory Booker brought his U.S. Senate campaign to South Jersey on Wednesday, outlining proposals he said would foster innovation and job growth. With declining federal investment in research and development initiatives, "America is going in the wrong direction," Booker told an invited audience of 50 during a town-hall event at Rowan University's South Jersey Technology Park in Mullica Hill. "We cannot have a first-class economy with a second-rate commitment to the priorities that we know empower us, and empower innovations, and empower growth and new jobs," Booker said.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard "Dick" Mortimer, 77, a Drexel University researcher, educator, and administrator, died Tuesday, July 2, of cardiac arrest at Paoli Memorial Hospital. In 1967, Dr. Mortimer became the first student to earn a Ph.D. at Drexel after completing his dissertation: "Axisymmetric motions of nearly flat shells of revolution. " "That moment was merely the midpoint of Dr. Mortimer's long and distinguished association with Drexel," said a January 2012 newsletter in the school's online archives.
NEWS
July 6, 2013 | By Keith Collins and Kathy Matheson, Associated Press
PRINCETON - With a 3-D printer, a petri dish, and some cells from a cow, Princeton University researchers are growing synthetic ears that can receive - and transmit - sound. The scientists send bovine cells mixed in a liquid gel through the printer, followed by tiny particles of silver. The printer is programmed to shape the material into a "bionic ear," and forms the silver particles into a coiled antenna. Like any antenna, this one can pick up radio signals that the ear will interpret as sound.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2013
First Hospital Foundation, a Philadelphia group that supports nonprofit organizations whose programs address the health needs of the most vulnerable and underserved populations, elected the following members to its board: Ronnie L. Bloom , partner at Opportunities Exchange; Joan K. King , senior integration consultant for the National Council for Behavioral Health; Estelle B. Richman , former senior adviser to the secretary of the...
NEWS
July 2, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Irma H. Russo, 71, of Rydal, a dedicated and innovative researcher at Fox Chase Cancer Center, died Tuesday, June 25, of ovarian cancer at the hospital. For the last 22 years, Dr. Russo worked at Fox Chase, first as director of surgical and clinical pathology, and then as director of the molecular endocrinology section of the Breast Cancer Research Laboratory. She and husband Dr. Jose Russo founded the lab in 1975. "She will be remembered not only by her many friends, colleagues, and the more than 50 physicians and scientists she trained and mentored over the years, but also by [those]
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