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NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kellie Woll administered a few squirts of clear liquid to a dish full of wriggling tadpoles and within minutes, the creatures became completely still. A few minutes after that, they started to move again. No surprise, as the liquid contained propofol, a widely used anesthetic. With it and most other anesthetics, however, there is not much difference between the amount needed to put someone to sleep and the amount that will knock one out permanently. Woll works in the University of Pennsylvania lab of Roderic G. Eckenhoff, who is on a long-term quest for better alternatives.
NEWS
April 16, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stuart G. Younkin was an Iowa farm boy whose skills in milking cows helped put him through college. While studying for bachelor's and master's degrees at Iowa State University in the late 1930s, "he was living on a farm" near campus, his daughter, Rebecca Kotrba said. "He was milking cows in the morning and at night" for the farm family, and tending to his studies the rest of the time. "Pretty incredible," she said. It was during the Depression, and his family's crop farm didn't produce enough to pay for his education.
NEWS
April 4, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kenneth Rowen Heimlich, 82, of West Chester, former director of research for Merck, Sharp & Dohme, died Tuesday, March 17, of Alzheimer's disease at his home. Born to Herman and Lula Heimlich in Rockford, Ill., Dr. Heimlich grew up in Indiana. He earned a bachelor of science degree in 1954, a master's degree in 1956, and a doctorate in 1958, all in pharmaceutical chemistry from Purdue University. Dr. Heimlich was director of pharmaceutical research and development for Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in West Point.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a few days, surgeons at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia are scheduled to operate on the heart of Graziella Nobile's newborn baby, fixing a grave arterial defect that, if left unrepaired, would be fatal. The hospital lately has a stellar record on that type of operation, in the sense of getting patients home alive. From 2009 to 2012, the most recent data available, 60 infants had this surgery, called an arterial switch, and all survived. The part that doctors have yet to figure out completely is the brain.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Simon's Fund, the local nonprofit that highlights the dangers of sudden cardiac death in children, has invested about $200,000 to build the first national registry for adolescent hearts. HeartBytes will collect data and imaging at screenings of students and young athletes nationwide and make it available for research into the puzzle of sudden cardiac arrest. Current plans call for academics to have free use of the data. But if "someone comes along who does have funds, like Pharma, I would entertain a fee for access," said Darren Sudman, cofounder of the fund named for his late son, Simon.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
You wouldn't buy a car without negotiating, would you? Health care is the same now. Feb. 15 is the last day to sign up for a health-insurance policy and avoid a tax penalty to Uncle Sam that could total 2 percent of your income. If you don't have coverage, today's the day. If you have insurance, there are ways to save money on your medical bills. Because, let's face it, even the new insurance isn't that affordable. Silver and bronze plans under the Affordable Care Act carry median family deductibles of roughly $2,500 and $5,100, respectively, according to data from management-consulting firm McKinsey & Co. As health-care costs shift to consumers, we need to negotiate services at fair prices.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
NEW YORK - John Oliver began his HBO show last spring without much of a plan. And as "Last Week Tonight" returns at 11 p.m. Sunday, he's sticking with it. "I wouldn't really credit us with much thought or strategy," Oliver said of his satirical news show, which quickly won attention for its deep dives into topics as diverse - and unexpectedly entertaining - as net neutrality, the Miss America pageant and FIFA, the governing body for...
NEWS
January 16, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Jackson, 81, and his partner of more than 40 years, Myrna Roach, 74, are the kind of older people many of us would like to be one day. Both still work and are energetic enough to travel extensively. They take medicine for high blood pressure and he has diabetes, but they feel healthy. They like to join clinical trials and know from one that their mental abilities have been stable for years. Still, Roach has a strong family history of Alzheimer's disease. Jackson doesn't, but Alzheimer's is the disease he dreads above all others.
NEWS
January 14, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
A MAN WHO will let a Florida king snake crawl through one sleeve of his robe and out the other is a man to be reckoned with. And then there was the iguana that had free rein of his home in Wayne and later Berwyn. In fact, the king snake had free rein, too, until his wife put her foot down. It is now in a tank. But Joel M. Kauffman was a man to be reckoned with for many other reasons, as well. A prominent chemist, researcher and medical writer, he would receive several hundred emails daily from people who just wanted to pick his brain.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
From beautiful office space in Radnor, Manuel Brocke-Benz, 56, heads an 8,700-employee, $4.4 billion company that's a market leader in its field. Ever heard of VWR International L.L.C.? "We are a little hidden," acknowledged Brocke-Benz, "And there's nothing wrong with that, to be very frank, because I know our potential customers and suppliers, and they all know us. " VWR essentially supplies labs - mostly with equipment, but also with people and services. On the equipment side, it distributes equipment made by others; customers know that VWR chooses its vendors carefully.
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