CollectionsResearch
IN THE NEWS

Research

NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donald Lewis Schotland, 84, of Wynnewood, an internationally known researcher into muscle disorders and for 38 years a leading figure in the University of Pennsylvania's neurology department, died Thursday, Aug. 13, of a stroke at Bryn Mawr Hospital. Dr. Schotland's career as an MD spanned almost 50 years. He arrived at Penn in 1967, rising through the ranks to become professor of neurology and, later, professor emeritus. He closed his lab in 1998 and retired from clinical practice in 2005.
NEWS
August 23, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
FRC censures Josh Duggar The conservative Christian lobbying org that once employed Josh Duggar has sent a letter excoriating the reality star of now-canceled 19 Kids and Counting after he admitted he had cheated on wife Anna . "We are grieved by Josh's conduct. . . . His deceitful behavior harms his family, his friends . . . and the cause he has publicly espoused," writes Family Research Council prez Tony Perkins . "Josh's failures serve as a painful reminder of the destructive effects of not living with integrity.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOSEPH TERRANCE Heard had this dream. He would start a program for boys who have had discipline problems at school and encourage them to chase the same dream that led him to a successful career in science. It was part of Joe's lifelong commitment to encourage others to follow his path, which took him from a childhood of poverty in Philadelphia public housing to a fulfilling career in mathematics and science research. His brother, Justin, said Joe spent his "time and efforts mentoring many of the youth of our community trying to light the spark of knowledge and education wherever he could.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Planned Parenthood is under attack by antiabortion activists over secretly recorded videos showing its executives candidly talking about supplying fetal tissue for medical research. This abortion-related controversy is providing grist for the many Republican presidential candidates hitting the trail. But it is also reviving public interest in fetal tissue research, which has yielded advances that have saved the lives of countless babies. Consider rubella. During a U.S. epidemic in the mid-1960s, an estimated 31,000 pregnant women infected with the virus suffered stillbirths, gave birth to severely disabled infants, or decided to end their pregnancies.
NEWS
July 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
A new diabetes research project aims to develop medicines by marrying chemistry expertise from Rowan University with animal physiology knowledge at Rutgers-Camden. Researchers at Rowan have begun work on some promising medicines, while Rutgers-Camden professors hope to examine plant-based folk medicines from Africa. Rowan scholars have the background to explore the mechanisms behind the medicines, while Rutgers-Camden will focus on testing them on diabetic mice. "We need each other, because the people at Rowan are unable to test the results of their medicines on the physiology," said Joseph V. Martin, a biology professor and associate dean at Rutgers-Camden, who is one of the primary researchers on the project.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Dr. Marvin E. Jaffe joined the former Merck, Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories in 1970, son Jonathan said, he hit his stride. "During his career at Merck," his son wrote in an appreciation of his father, "he was responsible for bringing a number of first-in-class drugs" to market, such as Sinemet for Parkinson's disease and Mevacor for cholesterol treatment. And referring to the joint venture with the firm AB Astra, his son said, Dr. Jaffe "had an integral role in the Astra-Merck alliance, which resulted in the development" of the heartburn drug Prilosec.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the Chicago Blackhawks, it's the Stanley Cup. For the New England Patriots, it was the Super Bowl ring. For Cherry Hill Mall shopper Jennifer Sommers, the moment of glory was the fabulous Michael Kors purse she scored on Memorial Day. Already 35 percent off, the price was slashed another 25 percent in the holiday sale. "It was at least a $300 purse," crowed a triumphant Sommers, 36, a social worker from Northeast Philadelphia. She was back at the mall recently with bags of booty from the semiannual sales at Bath and Body Works - $12.50 body wash for $3.50!
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Editor's note: This is the first in an occasional series about key people and discoveries at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, this year marking its 250th anniversary.   Fifty years ago, most scientists dismissed the idea that cancer could be seeded by the same kind of germ as colds and the flu. Not Gertrude and Werner Henle, husband-and-wife virologists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
National Institutes of Health director Francis Collins reminded biotech executives Wednesday in Philadelphia that the big money they hope to make from drugs, medical devices, and other health care technology often starts with the taxpayers. "NIH is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the world," Collins told a packed conference room at the BIO International 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. He then cautioned them about the political and economic realities of America.
NEWS
June 14, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly 50 years after the Epstein-Barr virus was discovered to cause human cancers, there are no good treatment options for the 200,000 new cases diagnosed annually, most of them in the world's poorest places. The Wistar Institute aims to change that. The illustrious Philadelphia research center last month received a three-year, $5.6 million grant from the Wellcome Trust in London to continue developing a novel anti-viral drug. "We certainly hope that this first-in-class drug we are developing will slow the progression or - even better - cure these deadly cancers," said Wistar senior scientist Troy Messick.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|