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Resentment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 29, 1986
There is a singular obtuseness about the federal proposal that targets government workers as potential drug addicts. Government workers, as a group, evidence no record of drug abuse. To spend $52 million - the start-up sum - to confirm the obvious is a waste of the taxpayers' money. This proposal can only have one consequence: It will foster a deep resentment by federal employees against their employer. They, like everybody else, oppose being treated as presumptive addicts. It is one thing to test someone because he evidences the signs of drug abuse; it is quite another to test someone just because he happens to be a federal employee.
SPORTS
June 6, 1988 | By Ron Reid, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Olympic boycott movement that induced Tommie Smith and John Carlos to take their memorable action 20 years ago originated during the turbulent mid- 1960s as the brainchild of Harry Edwards. Smith today has little admiration and considerable resentment for the man who coordinated their activities. "Harry Edwards was a mouthpiece and still is," Smith said. "We talked a lot then. Now we don't talk at all, unless I call him. He's involved in baseball and football. "In 1968, Tommie Smith and John Carlos were the persons who got booed.
NEWS
March 11, 1995
The new Masters of the Universe in Washington have declared war on the "cultural elite," starting with moves to cut funds to public broadcasting and to cripple the National Endowments for the Arts and for the Humanities. It plays well among many voters. It's no coincidence that this year's most popular movie has been "Dumb and Dumber," and that last year's biggest hit - critically as well as at the box office - glorified a simpleton. Not that our new leaders are dopes. On the contrary, Newt Gingrich is a very smart guy. Apparently, so are Phil Gramm, Rush Limbaugh and that frightening array of bright young people forming the New Right brain trust.
NEWS
July 23, 2002 | By Michael Eric Dyson
Allen Iverson is in trouble again. For some that's old news. For others, it's big business: Newspapers sell, news broadcast ratings soar, punditry proliferates. But with Iverson, what we see is always what we get. That's because what we see is largely shaped - maybe distorted - by the lens through which we view the controversial hoopster. We cannot divorce the recent accusations against Iverson from what we already believe about him. When some people look at Iverson, they see a thug: braids, tattoos, swagger and defiance.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
I work part time in the schools, and my husband travels a lot for his job. When he's out of town, I hate it when he calls and describes in detail what he had for dinner at some fancy restaurant while I'm eating leftovers with a 4- year-old. There's only one emotion I have, and it's resentment. How can I get over these unreasonable feelings? Though some business travel certainly may be necessary, if the stay-at-home spouse - husband or wife - is cavalierly left behind to tend both job and children, resentment can flourish.
NEWS
August 13, 1990 | By CLAUDE LEWIS
In the 21st century - and that's a mere 10 years away - racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. will outnumber whites for the first time. Everything in society, from education to industry and from apartment renting to politics, is going to be altered. The use of diverse languages will take place, no matter how many "English- only" signs are posted in the workplace. Change, not only in language but in values and culture, will be a natural consequence in the makeup of the "new" America.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2012
DEAR ABBY: Several years ago you printed a poem about forgiveness in your column. I clipped the column and saved it, but over time I seem to have lost it. Could you please run this piece again? - Daniela in Toronto DEAR DANIELA: I'm glad to oblige. The poem you have requested, "Decide to Forgive," was written by the late Robert Muller, former assistant secretary-general of the United Nations. Now, with so much turmoil going on in the nation and in the world, its sentiments are particularly relevant: DECIDE TO FORGIVE Decide to forgive For resentment is negative Resentment is poisonous Resentment diminishes and devours the self.
NEWS
September 18, 2008 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
Not long into "Lakeview Terrace," I was thinking about Jesse Jackson's open-mike comments about Barack Obama. It wasn't like I was bored. Far from it. I was engrossed in the movie's central character - a black man (Samuel J. Jackson) who resents the interracial couple next door - and I was trying to account for his resentment. Which brought me back to Jackson and Obama. There's been tension between the two men, a tension some pundits ascribe to the way the old-guard civil-rights warriors feel about the freedoms they've won - they have battle scars, and they resent how comparatively easy things have come to succeeding generations.
NEWS
June 15, 1995 | By Mark Randall
It's frustrating that whenever white males oppose affirmative action on principle, they are nevertheless suspected of being mostly concerned about their own interests and the imagined threat of reverse discrimination. Defenders of affirmative action, who once believed that color-blind equal opportunity was the proper national goal, now view the principle facetiously and suspect that it is only trotted out, like a choir boy's cassock, to cover mischievous instincts with a look of sanctimony.
NEWS
November 3, 1991 | By Karen Auge, Special to The Inquirer
They do not agree on much. Supporters and critics of the plan to reopen the Maple Point High School cannot agree on costs for renovating buildings, on the future tab for operating the schools, on what impact a proposed bond issue would have on tax bills or even on how many students a given school can house. But in the Neshaminy School District, where the emotionally charged debate over a second high school has ripped the community apart, virtually everyone agrees on one point: The first chapter in the history of Maple Point was not a happy one. "We have a lot of people that remember Maple Point being open before, and it was a disaster for the community.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2016 | $util.encode.html($!item.byline), $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
ARIES (March 21-April 19). To bring full attention to dressing, eating, walking and the rest is a form of meditation. It's almost impossible to execute, but you'll learn how easily and often we fall out of the moment. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). You're not looking for love, but love is looking for you, and it will finally make eye contact this afternoon. The attention will trigger contradictory emotions; you may feel like fighting the attraction. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You want to learn, but you don't like the feeling of being managed by an authority figure.
NEWS
July 22, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My beloved father passed away three years ago. One of my older sisters moved in with Mom to help take care of her and be her companion. My sister has a boyfriend my father absolutely disliked, and the rest of our family doesn't like him either. My issue (and I'm not the only family member who feels this way) is that when her boyfriend is at the house, he sits in Dad's chair. It's hard enough not seeing Dad there anymore, but seeing the boyfriend sitting there is offensive.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I live with my parents and am not fond of children. My father volunteers me to baby-sit my nieces while they are right in front of us and before I have a chance to discuss anything. If I stand up for myself and say no, my father lays a guilt trip on me and tells the kids that their aunt is "being mean. " I'm grateful that my parents took me in after I graduated from university, which has allowed me to work on a second degree. However, when I am volunteered to do something I don't enjoy -- like entertain the kids -- my father somehow always manages to leave the house.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2016
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I have been married for almost six years to a great guy and have three small children. My widowed mother-in-law, "Nancy," recently had a stroke and needs daily care, so she moved in with us. I love her and am glad to be there for her, but, even though I'm a stay-at-home mom and we have hired a part-time aide, it is a lot. My husband and his younger brother work long hours in the family business, plus there is a limited amount Nancy is comfortable having her sons do for her. I asked my sister-in-law, "Lena," whom I have a great relationship with, to pitch in with Mom's care.
NEWS
February 28, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I grew up in a poor family on a farm in the South. I worked very hard during my childhood. Throughout my childhood, I was told I was a "bad girl" who always did the wrong things or who would never stop talking. When I was 16, I moved more than 1,000 miles away. My mother happily drove me to the airport to go and live with my 21-year-old boyfriend. I am 29 now and still live more than 1,000 miles away. To this day, when I try to discuss (with my mother) why she sent me away so young, she tells me I was "too difficult of a child" and that was what I wanted, so she signed me over at the end of 10th grade before summer break.
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | By Carolyn Hax
Adapted from a recent online discussion.   Question: I've been with my husband for 16 years, married 10. We were friends at first, and it grew into a mutual love. Generally, we're great. The not-so-great part is he stopped wanting sex, and it has been a source of contention for a few years now. Even with all the friendship and ability to talk issues out, this is one thing he just hasn't improved on. No doctor visits for it, no therapy, nothing. We were going to try for kids.
NEWS
August 25, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
For decades, Gloucester Township has yearned to earn a place on the regional retailing map. But the construction of an upscale discount shopping complex in the Blackwood section is provoking mixed emotions. Gloucester Premium Outlets "will be the largest economic development project in the history of our community," says Mayor David Mayer, who describes the center as "a $40 million [property tax] ratable, when all is said and done. " The mayor's choice of words is important. While he expects the township ultimately will collect $1.4 million annually, the outlets between Route 42 and the Black Horse Pike will not pay property taxes in full for five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
IF YOU'RE PLANNING to attend the Beyonce-Jay Z "On the Run" show at Citizens Bank Park on Saturday night, be prepared for some fireworks. And we don't mean up in the sky. From the Solange vs. Jay Z elevator battle in May until now, there have been widespread rumors of trouble in the marriage of Solange's older sister and her husband. Was Jay unfaithful? And if so, how much of a dog do you have to be to cheat on Beyonce? What could you be looking for somewhere else except for someone who's less attractive, less talented and less successful?
NEWS
June 26, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
For more than two years, Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane hounded Gov. Corbett with the suggestion that he slowed the Sandusky child sex-abuse investigation for political gain when he was the state's top law enforcement official. Yet when Kane released a report Monday that concluded there was no evidence of that, Corbett stayed silent. There was no I-told-you-so news conference, just a muted statement from the governor's office. Corbett's advisers calculated that neither the report nor any response he might make would change minds on the emotionally charged issues surrounding Pennsylvania State University, where Jerry Sandusky was an assistant football coach and founder of a charity for wayward boys.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2013
DEAR ABBY: My husband's stepmother and father send religious-themed gifts for every holiday. We have an abundance of unused books, DVDs, stickers, coloring books, dolls, bookmarks, etc., purchased from local Christian stores for a hefty price. We don't see them often during the year because we live in different states, but we would like our kids to have a good relationship with them. The kids don't seem to be fazed by it, but they also don't get excited about opening and using these gifts.
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