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Residence Hall

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NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Ashley Nguyen, PHILLY.COM
In the spring, St. Joseph's University began building a residence hall for freshmen; when it opens next fall, there will be more spots in existing dorms for upperclassmen who want to live closer to campus. On the Main Line, Villanova University and Haverford College also are working on dorm projects to accommodate ever-changing student needs. It's not just a local phenomenon. Loren Rullman of the Society for College and University Planning said similar projects were under way around the country.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Valley Forge Christian College plans to begin construction by summer on its first new residence hall. The $4.3 million building will house 124 students. About 580 of the college's 666 students live in 10 buildings that were already on the grounds when the college moved to the site of the former Valley Forge General Hospital in 1976. College president Don Meyer said that projected enrollment for the fall is nearly 800 students and that in five years it could reach 1,100. In the last four years, enrollment has increased 52 percent, he said.
LIVING
September 3, 1999 | By Diane Goldsmith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philomena Marino was describing the tomato sauce she had whipped up from scratch at her place on the Villanova campus. "My grandmother brought the tomatoes," said the junior, who hails from West Philly. "All you add is oil, garlic and basil. " Are undergraduates cooking in their rooms these days? Not quite. They're cooking in the apartments and microwaving in the apartment-style suites that colleges are building to lure this affluent generation. "Apartment-style or pod-style facilities are going like hotcakes," said Patrick Bradley, president of the Association of College and University Housing Officers International.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Tim McCracken, a junior at St. Joseph's University, logged onto his computer one recent morning, he found a message in his electronic "mailbox. " An instructor had used the campuswide electronic mail system to notify students they could use their books during a test scheduled for that morning at 11. Most of his classmates discovered the note when they began using computers in one of the campus terminal rooms and then scrambled to round up their books. But McCracken got the news without leaving his dorm room in McShain Hall.
SPORTS
November 23, 2010 | By the Inquirer Staff
Philadelphia police are investigating the alleged sexual assault of a woman in a Temple University residence hall early Saturday. According to CBS3 and 6ABC, the student told police that two Temple football players raped her in a dormitory room. Philadelphia police told The Inquirer Monday that they are investigating a sexual assault on Temple's campus but gave no further information. An athletic department spokesman deferred comment to a university spokesman. "We received a report of a sexual assault from a student on Saturday that took place on our campus in a residence hall," said Ray Betzner, an assistant vice president for university communications at Temple.
NEWS
June 23, 1998 | by Jeremy Moore, Daily News Staff Writer
For Temple University, the decision is between preserving its history or preserving its appeal for incoming students. Built in 1886, Thomas Hall is Temple's oldest free-standing building and the former location of WRTI student radio. It is scheduled to be demolished at the end of the summer to make way for a five-story residence hall. Martin Dorph, Temple's chief financial officer and treasurer, said students who refuse Temple admission do so because of a lack of residence life on campus.
NEWS
August 27, 2002 | By Jake Wagman INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The border war is over. To the delight of residents who did not want 140 college students in their neighborhood, Rowan University has scrapped plans to open a dormitory in neighboring Washington Township. The Glassboro university had an oral agreement to buy the Gardens at Cross Keys, a 59-room complex built for a now-bankrupt nursing-home management company, school officials said. But an appraisal commissioned by Rowan put the facility's value at a half-million dollars below the asking price.
NEWS
October 7, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Area campuses have shown a commitment to green living with a variety of green dorm projects. Here's a sampling: Villanova University renovated an 80-year-old residence hall - the school's first green dorm. It boasts furniture made of recycled materials, two rain gardens that capture roof runoff (with displays that show the quantity), and lights fitted with motion sensors. Showers automatically shut off after eight minutes, though students can pull a cord to continue. "But it's a reminder that you've been in there for a while," said Robert Morro, associate vice president for facilities management.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple's ongoing construction will be substantial but will not push further into residential areas of North Philadelphia, university president Ann Weaver Hart said Tuesday. Hart, in a meeting with the Inquirer Editorial Board, disclosed details of the $1.2 billion expansion of Temple's main campus, saying the size of the university's footprint in North Philadelphia will not increase. As The Inquirer reported last year, Temple's expansion will develop the university's Broad Street corridor.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 9, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
The number in Michael Dausch's head is 66 - that's how many work days separate graduation at the University of Pennsylvania and the arrival of students for the fall semester. "We count it down," said Dausch, executive director of design and construction management at Penn. And with good reason. When 25,000 Penn students head home for the summer, Dausch's department goes into hyper-blitz. This summer - a typical one - 40 projects with a price tag of $60 million are underway at Penn, the city's largest private employer.
NEWS
July 5, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cheyney University abruptly announced on Thursday the retirement of its president, Michelle R. Howard-Vital, and said her successor would take over Monday. Vital led the historically black university on the Delaware and Chester county line for seven years. The university's deficit has grown under her watch, and enrollment has not increased - trends that are exacerbating the school's already troubled position. "I think that Dr. Vital was absolutely an academician who did a lot of good things at Cheyney," said Robert Bogle, chair of Cheyney's board of trustees.
NEWS
March 7, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Martin Overline doesn't like to brag, so he leaves it to others to say what he will not: He ranks among the best mouse men on the East Coast. He doesn't breed mice or collect them for study. He kills them. Sends them on their furry, four-footed journey to that giant mousetrap in the sky. And metes out similar fates to other creeping, crawling pests. In Philadelphia, Overline is an exterminator extraordinaire, the go-to, get-rid-of-'em guy for some of the region's major universities, corporations, and government agencies.
NEWS
October 16, 2011 | By Ashley Nguyen, PHILLY.COM
In the spring, St. Joseph's University began building a residence hall for freshmen; when it opens next fall, there will be more spots in existing dorms for upperclassmen who want to live closer to campus. On the Main Line, Villanova University and Haverford College also are working on dorm projects to accommodate ever-changing student needs. It's not just a local phenomenon. Loren Rullman of the Society for College and University Planning said similar projects were under way around the country.
NEWS
December 8, 2010 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple's ongoing construction will be substantial but will not push further into residential areas of North Philadelphia, university president Ann Weaver Hart said Tuesday. Hart, in a meeting with the Inquirer Editorial Board, disclosed details of the $1.2 billion expansion of Temple's main campus, saying the size of the university's footprint in North Philadelphia will not increase. As The Inquirer reported last year, Temple's expansion will develop the university's Broad Street corridor.
SPORTS
November 23, 2010 | By the Inquirer Staff
Philadelphia police are investigating the alleged sexual assault of a woman in a Temple University residence hall early Saturday. According to CBS3 and 6ABC, the student told police that two Temple football players raped her in a dormitory room. Philadelphia police told The Inquirer Monday that they are investigating a sexual assault on Temple's campus but gave no further information. An athletic department spokesman deferred comment to a university spokesman. "We received a report of a sexual assault from a student on Saturday that took place on our campus in a residence hall," said Ray Betzner, an assistant vice president for university communications at Temple.
NEWS
October 7, 2009 | By Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writer
Area campuses have shown a commitment to green living with a variety of green dorm projects. Here's a sampling: Villanova University renovated an 80-year-old residence hall - the school's first green dorm. It boasts furniture made of recycled materials, two rain gardens that capture roof runoff (with displays that show the quantity), and lights fitted with motion sensors. Showers automatically shut off after eight minutes, though students can pull a cord to continue. "But it's a reminder that you've been in there for a while," said Robert Morro, associate vice president for facilities management.
NEWS
June 19, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Much of Cheyney University's financial woes were due to nearly $7 million in unpaid student bills, an amount that has been cut nearly in half the last few months, officials said yesterday. Irene Moszer, Cheyney's outgoing vice president of finance and administration, told the board of trustees yesterday that the school had stepped up efforts to help students fill out and file financial-aid forms so that their bills could be paid. About $3.7 million in unpaid bills remain, she said.
NEWS
June 14, 2009 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Long-struggling Cheyney University is well on its way to digging out of financial problems, and beginning next week, it will get help with its academics from a new panel of prominent national leaders in the work of historically black colleges, state officials said. The 1,488-student school is closing a deficit that once ran to $2 million in a $27 million budget, said John C. Cavanaugh, chancellor of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, which oversees Cheyney and 13 other colleges and universities.
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