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Residential Areas

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NEWS
May 14, 1987 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
A letter from a resident has prompted the Lower Moreland Board of Commissioners to review speed limits on residential streets in the township in addition to requesting that the police monitor Winthrop Road for speeding motorists. During its meeting Tuesday night, the commissioners reviewed requests by Janet Thorpe of Winthrop Road. Thorpe had written the board requesting that stop signs be placed on her residential street to deter speeders. Police Chief Frank J. Amabile said there was not enough traffic on the road to justify a stop sign.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Worried that someone will turn the house next door into a nursery school? A club? The Board of Commissioners has decided it can't happen - at least not for now - unless the site's entrance is on a major road. The board on Wednesday passed an ordinance forbidding clubs, fraternities, private educational institutions, religious uses, and hospitals in residential areas unless they are on primary, secondary or tertiary roads - relatively busy streets such as Montgomery Avenue or Old Gulph Road.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Need a pack of smokes at 2 a.m.? Have to make a toilet-paper run at midnight? You may soon be out of luck. A bill pushed by Councilman Darrell L. Clarke - and up for final vote in City Council today - would scale back the hours of operation for a number of retail stores that operate on predominantly residential blocks. The purpose of the bill, Clarke said, is to crack down on criminal or nuisance activity outside late-night establishments in city neighborhoods. To do so, he said, his bill would require retail shops on blocks where 80 percent of the buildings are residential dwellings to open no earlier than 6 a.m. and close by 11 p.m. But the legislation has whipped city business groups into an uproar.
NEWS
May 15, 1998 | By Stephanie A. Stanley, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To the applause of fellow Wynnewood residents, Commissioner Alan C. Kessler said the township should continue to restrict schools, clubs, social-service centers, and churches in residential neighborhoods to main roads. The restriction was approved in January 1997 as a temporary measure that would govern the location of institutions in residential areas until the township developed an ordinance that could better address each situation. The Board of Commissioners formed a committee to write the ordinance, which was presented Wednesday night at a Building and Planning Committee meeting.
NEWS
January 21, 1996 | By Jan Hefler, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Borough Council has tabled an unpopular proposal that would prohibit certain businesses from operating in residential areas. Several residents complained at a meeting Tuesday that the proposed ordinance was too vague and could put them out of work. Many were contractors objecting to a provision that would bar construction vehicles from being parked in driveways or on residential streets. The ordinance was drafted after the borough received complaints from residents who said the businesses brought unwanted traffic and noise into their neighborhoods.
NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Tom and Rita Alessio found out the hard way that adding a "mother-in-law suite" to one's home is a no-no in Cherry Hill. They built the addition in 2007 so their grown daughter, Bernadette, could comfortably live under their roof. Now the Alessios, who are in their 90s, want to sell their home in the township's Kingston section. The snag: The single-story backyard extension for which they obtained municipal approvals is considered illegal because it has a full kitchen. Prospective buyer Dorothy Leafey, 61, wants the kitchen so she can live independently; her son, John, 38, would reside in the original portion of the house.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
MICHAEL Tremoglie's glib dismissal of concerns over current casino sitings (op-ed, Jan. 28) ignores real impact of having casinos on the river near residential areas. Millions would have to be spent on mitigation, so those concerns are most certainly neither "bogus" nor "self-centered. " Thousands of us in the target areas simply want a solution that protects our homes and neighborhoods. Anne Dicker's assessment of the economic and social impacts of casinos, while palpable, seems somewhat naive and an argument you could also use to make Philadelphia a dry town in a wet state because of concerns with drinking.
NEWS
November 3, 1996 | By Karen Auerbach, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Nothing outside Peggy and Bryan Rynearson's home on Tenby Chase Drive betrays what goes on inside their front door. On weekdays, Peggy Rynearson converts the house into a small, licensed day-care center. Bryan Rynearson, a sales manager for an international marketing and manufacturing company, works from a first-floor office, conducting his business by computer, fax and phone. With the Delran Township Council's passage of an ordinance permitting many home-based offices, entrepreneurs and home office users such as the Rynearsons no longer will be operating on the wrong side of the law. The new ordinance, which becomes law within 20 days of its Oct. 23 passage, allows residents to set up home offices, provided they do not disrupt the neighborhood with noise and traffic.
NEWS
January 24, 1993 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Joanna Rhodes called it a "victory for the community" when she prevented a business from opening next door to her home on South Barber Avenue. And now, other commercial sites in residential neighborhoods that want to expand or change uses will be scrutinized more closely, local zoning officials say. The idea is to protect the aesthetics of the city's neighborhoods. "They will be handled on a case-by-case basis," said Jack Paterson, chairman of the zoning board. About 30 feet separates Rhodes' house in the 200 block of South Barber Avenue from a small, green, one-story commercial building.
NEWS
November 21, 1986 | By HOWARD SCHNEIDER, Daily News Staff Writer
City Council has lowered the boom. In giving final passage yesterday to three ordinances restricting the public playing of loud portable radios and tape players commonly referred to as boom boxes, Council assured that some neighborhoods will be able to rest in peace, said Councilman John Street. "The problems associated with the loud volume of these things has reached almost epidemic proportion in certain neighborhoods," said Street, who sponsored the measures. The ordinances, which go to Mayor Goode for his signature, restrict the use of boom boxes in these ways: Earphones must be used during business hours in commercial districts and at night in residential areas.
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NEWS
February 4, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Tom and Rita Alessio found out the hard way that adding a "mother-in-law suite" to one's home is a no-no in Cherry Hill. They built the addition in 2007 so their grown daughter, Bernadette, could comfortably live under their roof. Now the Alessios, who are in their 90s, want to sell their home in the township's Kingston section. The snag: The single-story backyard extension for which they obtained municipal approvals is considered illegal because it has a full kitchen. Prospective buyer Dorothy Leafey, 61, wants the kitchen so she can live independently; her son, John, 38, would reside in the original portion of the house.
NEWS
April 6, 2012 | By Zeina Karam and Elizabeth A. Kennedy, Associated Press
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Syria launched a blistering assault Thursday on the outskirts of its capital, shelling residential areas and deploying snipers on rooftops as international envoy Kofi Annan demanded that every fighter lay down arms in time for a U.N.-brokered cease-fire. The bloodshed undermined already fading hopes that more than a year of violence will end soon, and France accused President Bashar al-Assad of trying to fool the world by accepting Annan's deadline to pull the army back from population centers by April 10. According to the plan, rebels are supposed to stop fighting 48 hours later, paving the way for talks to end Assad's violent suppression of the uprising against his rule.
NEWS
January 30, 2008
MICHAEL Tremoglie's glib dismissal of concerns over current casino sitings (op-ed, Jan. 28) ignores real impact of having casinos on the river near residential areas. Millions would have to be spent on mitigation, so those concerns are most certainly neither "bogus" nor "self-centered. " Thousands of us in the target areas simply want a solution that protects our homes and neighborhoods. Anne Dicker's assessment of the economic and social impacts of casinos, while palpable, seems somewhat naive and an argument you could also use to make Philadelphia a dry town in a wet state because of concerns with drinking.
NEWS
March 24, 2007 | By Tom Belden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Federal Aviation Administration yesterday revealed its plan for reshuffling the way planes navigate the crowded airspace over New York and Philadelphia. Locally, the change would reroute departing flights from Philadelphia International Airport flights over more suburban residential areas. In Delaware County, the decision was received as warmly as an air strike. "They choose the alternative that had the most devastating impact on Delaware County," County Council Chairman Andrew J. Reilly said.
NEWS
December 17, 2004 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At its last meeting of 2004 yesterday, City Council approved spending $30 million in city funds to expand the Central Library of the Free Library of Philadelphia, despite ongoing concerns over how to best pay for the project. Also at its session yesterday - one of the busiest of the year - Council passed legislation awarding $30 million in state grants to make public improvements at the proposed Center City office tower where Comcast Corp. would be the major tenant. Council also approved a bill scaling back hours of operation for retail stores on predominantly residential blocks as well as legislation prohibiting signs and posters from being placed on public property.
NEWS
December 2, 2004 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Need a pack of smokes at 2 a.m.? Have to make a toilet-paper run at midnight? You may soon be out of luck. A bill pushed by Councilman Darrell L. Clarke - and up for final vote in City Council today - would scale back the hours of operation for a number of retail stores that operate on predominantly residential blocks. The purpose of the bill, Clarke said, is to crack down on criminal or nuisance activity outside late-night establishments in city neighborhoods. To do so, he said, his bill would require retail shops on blocks where 80 percent of the buildings are residential dwellings to open no earlier than 6 a.m. and close by 11 p.m. But the legislation has whipped city business groups into an uproar.
NEWS
August 19, 2004 | By David H. Moskowitz
Your next-door neighbor tells you that a new project is proposed for the vacant property at the end of your cul-de-sac. You recall the paint factory that was suggested for the land a few years ago and how the neighborhood successfully urged the township supervisors not to rezone the lot to industrial. Now you're told the plan is for something with far more impact. It will have heavy traffic, long hours of operation, even potentially criminal activities. So you mobilize again, petition your township board - and find out there's nothing it can do about it. Why?
NEWS
January 21, 2003 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Township officials could approve a controversial historic-preservation law tonight that its supporters said would preserve nearly 100 houses and barns for generations. The law would require township approval for a homeowner or developer to drastically change a building or property on the township's preservation list. The law also allows structures in certain residential areas to be used for commercial purposes. "It's important for any community to protect its historic resources," said E. Martin Shane, chairman of East Goshen's Board of Supervisors.
NEWS
January 3, 2002 | By Kayce T. Ataiyero INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The township's Board of Supervisors is considering an ordinance that would require businesses along Cabot Boulevard East to cover a portion of the $1.7 million cost for new construction in the area. The ordinance, still in its preliminary stages, would assess 14 businesses a share of the cost of the project, which would include installing street lighting, curbs, and a storm-water management system, Falls Township Manager Wayne Bergman said. The businesses would be assigned a certain percentage of the costs based on the results of a study that will gauge traffic patterns in the area, he said.
NEWS
November 15, 2000 | By Robert F. O'Neill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Swarthmore College has again stirred the wrath of some borough residents, this time with a proposal to extend its institutional zoning into three off-campus residential areas. Four people appeared at a Borough Council meeting Monday night - three of them to condemn the proposal, characterizing it variously as "a creeping process of invading residential uses" and "a threat to the value of homes. " The fourth objected to another part of the plan. Among the irate residents were Borough Councilman Donald W. Delson and former Councilwoman Lora Lavin.
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