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FOOD
August 13, 1986 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: I bought a beautiful old chair at a thrift shop that I want to refinish. There are several deep gouges in one arm. Is there anyway to cover or fix these mars? - Karen Dear Karen: You can fill gouges and deep scratches with either a resin stick or a wood-forming plastic. Both products are available at hardware and woodworking stores. I obtained the following instructions from my local cooperative extension office. The cooperative extension service is a great resource for solving many problems.
NEWS
March 22, 1989 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 3,900 gallons of resin accidentally spilled yesterday from a tank at a Kensington plant and traveled through the sewer system to the Northeast Water Pollution Control Plant, where several city employees were temporarily evacuated because of the resin's odor, authorities said. Fire and Water Department officials said the resin, a chemical known as divinylbenzene, began escaping from the Purolite facility in the 3600 block of G Street about 3 a.m. The resin is used in water purification, according to company employees.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
DETROIT - The potential shortage of a key component used to make fuel lines and brake lines could force automakers in the U.S. and around the world to close car and truck plants as they run short of parts. A March 31 explosion in western Germany damaged a factory that makes CDT. That chemical is a key component in a nylon resin called PA12, which is used to make a specialized plastic. The plastic is used in auto fuel lines and brake lines. It is also a component in solar cells, pipelines, sporting goods and household items.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Richard Wool looks at a soybean, he sees a natural resource that can be made into cars, farm machines and particleboard. For 10 years, Wool, a chemical engineering professor at the University of Delaware, has researched the use of soybean oil to make affordable manufacturing materials. Wool has developed a patented process that chemically modifies soybean oil so it can be made into a composite resin. Most commercial resins are made with petrochemicals. "The soybean resin is basically a petrochemical resin look-alike, except it's from renewable resources and it's cheaper," Wool said.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988 | By Nancy Hass, Daily News Staff Writer
The plastic bag industry has had about enough. After suffering nearly a decade of bad publicity for their product's infamous non-degradability, one company has introduced a bag that will disintergrate - sort of. Poly-Tech of Minneapolis announced yesterday that its Ruffies brand garbage bag will now be made from a photo-sensitive resin, which the company refused to identify, and polyethylene. The degradable bags, designed to break down in sunlight after a period of several months, will hit the market in November.
NEWS
October 24, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the second consecutive weekend, vandals have spray-painted swastikas and curses on property here, but police and residents say the incidents look more like youthful pranks than hate crimes. The culprits bent bird feeders, destroyed mailboxes, and spread fiberglass resin over the seats of a 23-foot cruise boat dry-docked on Little Mill Road. They also threw a split-rail fence into the middle of the street, and painted curses on the boat. As for the swastikas, they were backward.
LIVING
September 6, 2002 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cube-shaped block of silicon rubber doesn't sound like prized furniture for your living room. Or even for the deck. But in the hands of two Philadelphians, an architect and a sculptor, that hunk of petrochemical becomes the Cube Stool - a fascinating square of firm, translucent plastic with the texture of highly processed rubber. Place it in a dark space, and it has the unearthly ability to absorb background light and throw it off as a sublime glow. The stool is one of the signature pieces of Float, a new high-end furniture line started by Jeanne Scandura and her former business partner, Kait Midgett.
REAL_ESTATE
December 30, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Recycling and its importance are talked about a lot, but many experts believe the rate of recycling is actually dropping every year as total consumption increases. Juan Ying-Hao, a design student from Taiwan who attends Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., believes this trend will continue even if renewable and biodegradable materials gain popularity. The reason: Centralized collection systems that have been developed for handling recycled materials will be overwhelmed by demand.
LIVING
November 18, 2005 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gaetano Pesce is a world-famous designer, a creator of iconic furniture, and an architect of radical buildings, but don't ask him for any aesthetic pronouncements. He's not interested in being a design dictator. For Pesce (pronounced PE-shay), who comes to the Philadelphia Museum of Art tonight to accept the Design Excellence Award from the group Collab, the world is already too full of people issuing edicts on design correctness and good taste. They are "so absolute, so rigid," he said.
NEWS
June 27, 1994 | BY RENEE LUCAS WAYNE Daily News wire services and Working Mother magazine contributed to this report
MEN AT WORK: We have yet to conduct our own independent study, but experts say that men are indeed beginning to do more around the house (besides the usual guy stuff, that is). They still lag behind women, but here's a rundown of how much of each task is performed by men: Grocery-shopping: 28 percent Doing dishes: 24 percent Vacuuming the house: 24 percent Cooking: 19 percent Floor-mopping: 17 percent Laundry: 13 percent Disciplining children: 46 percent Helping children with homework: 33 percent Dealing with the children's schools: 32 percent Planning meals children eat: 16 percent Household repairs: 79 percent Paying bills: 40 percent Making social plans: 39 percent Caring for elderly parents: 35 percent THE ITCHY & SCRATCHY SHOW: Resin in the veins of poison ivy plant affects three out of every four people, and reactions range from an intensely irritating and itchy rash to a life-threatening situation where victims may need hospitalization or steroid injections.
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NEWS
February 5, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Greek and Roman historians were fond of depicting northern Europeans as beer-swilling barbarians, incapable of appreciating the fruits of sun-splashed Mediterranean vineyards. Writing in the late first century B.C., Dionysius of Halicarnassus sniffed that northerners were known to drink a "foul-smelling liquor made from barley rotted in water. " Time to give the barbarians some credit, says University of Pennsylvania archaeologist Patrick E. McGovern. Chemical analysis of residues from ancient drinking vessels and strainers, found in what are now Denmark and Sweden, reveal traces of elaborate hybrid beverages made from berries, birch resin, honey, and herbs, McGovern said.
NEWS
April 17, 2012
DETROIT - The potential shortage of a key component used to make fuel lines and brake lines could force automakers in the U.S. and around the world to close car and truck plants as they run short of parts. A March 31 explosion in western Germany damaged a factory that makes CDT. That chemical is a key component in a nylon resin called PA12, which is used to make a specialized plastic. The plastic is used in auto fuel lines and brake lines. It is also a component in solar cells, pipelines, sporting goods and household items.
REAL_ESTATE
December 30, 2007 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Recycling and its importance are talked about a lot, but many experts believe the rate of recycling is actually dropping every year as total consumption increases. Juan Ying-Hao, a design student from Taiwan who attends Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., believes this trend will continue even if renewable and biodegradable materials gain popularity. The reason: Centralized collection systems that have been developed for handling recycled materials will be overwhelmed by demand.
LIVING
November 18, 2005 | By Eils Lotozo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gaetano Pesce is a world-famous designer, a creator of iconic furniture, and an architect of radical buildings, but don't ask him for any aesthetic pronouncements. He's not interested in being a design dictator. For Pesce (pronounced PE-shay), who comes to the Philadelphia Museum of Art tonight to accept the Design Excellence Award from the group Collab, the world is already too full of people issuing edicts on design correctness and good taste. They are "so absolute, so rigid," he said.
LIVING
September 6, 2002 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A cube-shaped block of silicon rubber doesn't sound like prized furniture for your living room. Or even for the deck. But in the hands of two Philadelphians, an architect and a sculptor, that hunk of petrochemical becomes the Cube Stool - a fascinating square of firm, translucent plastic with the texture of highly processed rubber. Place it in a dark space, and it has the unearthly ability to absorb background light and throw it off as a sublime glow. The stool is one of the signature pieces of Float, a new high-end furniture line started by Jeanne Scandura and her former business partner, Kait Midgett.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2000 | By Rosland Briggs-Gammon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When LNP Engineering Plastics Inc.'s products leave the loading docks, they look like colored rice. By the time they reach consumers, they've been transformed into larger plastic parts that hold the guts of computer printers, house cameras lenses, provide handles for gardening tools, or conceal the insides of cellular phones. LNP, which is based in Exton, embeds plastic compounds with fiberglass, Teflon or other materials to provide them with properties such as heat resistance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2000 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Although Fritz Dietel and Brooke Moyer approach sculpture from different directions, both are committed to communicating their particular truths through the traditional avenue of form, materials, surface and color. In his third solo exhibition at Schmidt/Dean Gallery, Dietel has filled the Spruce Street space with wood-constructed forms, some podlike, that are either inspired by nature or intended to evoke it. A master of bending and shaping wood, Dietel has created a cynosure of this skill in Cloak, a large, curled floor sculpture.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2000 | By Rosland Briggs-Gammon, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hercules Inc. said yesterday that it will spin off its food-gums business into a joint venture with Lehman Bros. and sell its resins division to streamline its businesses and reduce debt. Hercules' stock price has fallen to less than half its July 1999 value. Last month, its credit rating was lowered. The Wilmington company also said the joint venture will purchase the Kelco biogums business owned by Monsanto Co. for $685 million. The venture will pay Hercules $550 million for the food-gums business, which makes pectin found in jams, jellies and other products.
BUSINESS
August 27, 1998 | By Andrea Ahles, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Richard Wool looks at a soybean, he sees a natural resource that can be made into cars, farm machines and particleboard. For 10 years, Wool, a chemical engineering professor at the University of Delaware, has researched the use of soybean oil to make affordable manufacturing materials. Wool has developed a patented process that chemically modifies soybean oil so it can be made into a composite resin. Most commercial resins are made with petrochemicals. "The soybean resin is basically a petrochemical resin look-alike, except it's from renewable resources and it's cheaper," Wool said.
NEWS
October 24, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For the second consecutive weekend, vandals have spray-painted swastikas and curses on property here, but police and residents say the incidents look more like youthful pranks than hate crimes. The culprits bent bird feeders, destroyed mailboxes, and spread fiberglass resin over the seats of a 23-foot cruise boat dry-docked on Little Mill Road. They also threw a split-rail fence into the middle of the street, and painted curses on the boat. As for the swastikas, they were backward.
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