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REAL_ESTATE
September 11, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Beth Goldwater grew up summering in a recreational resort community in the Poconos. She joined the children's swim team there and competed in pools at nearby resorts, most of which had been developed in the mid-20th century with modest, chalet-style homes around man-made lakes. One resort, Buck Hill Falls, was older, grander, and more beautiful, Beth remembers. "Why don't we live here?" she wondered. It had an Olympic-size pool and much more. There were rocky cliffs, running creeks, a dramatic waterfall, woodlands of rhododendron and hemlock, and splendid stone mansions set into the sides of the hills.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | By Steve Stecklow, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are no golf courses here. No row of high-rise hotels along the beach. No duty-free malls, no casinos, no Kentucky Fried Chicken. This is what there is: Two giant, jagged volcanic cones, providing as dramatic a sight as anywhere in the Caribbean. A clean, crescent-shaped, white-sand beach that steps down to a fabulous coral reef. A cluster of private, unobtrusive, octagonal-shape rooms perched along a palm-studded hillside. And a small, open-air restaurant, surrounded by tropical foliage, that serves Creole-style cooking.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Monika Scislowska, Associated Press
BIALKA TATRZANSKA, Poland - Just a few years ago, winter was a dead season for the Kotelnica Mountain, quiet under a quilt of snow. Today, Kotelnica vibrates with activity from ski fans who flock to the new resort, one of Poland's trendiest. The transformation happened in just a decade and reflects the inventiveness and enterprise seen in Poland since a market economy arrived with democracy in 1990. People in this 17th-century village at the foot of the Tatra Mountains in southern Poland were making a modest living on farming and sheep breeding, with additional funds coming from relatives who had gone, in a long-standing tradition, to the United States for work.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | Associated Press
A city on the Pacific Coast is reaching out to a Jersey Shore town with a similar name. Seaside, Ore., plans several fund-raising events to help finance a new town entrance for Seaside Heights, N.J., heavily damaged during Hurricane Sandy. Don Larson, the mayor of Seaside, told New Jersey 101.5 that he saw a lot of similarities with the New Jersey borough. Both are coastal towns with tourism-driven economies, Larson said, and both are acutely aware of the damage natural disasters mean for them.
NEWS
January 16, 1992 | By Robert F. O'Neill, Special to The Inquirer
Around the turn of the century, Philadelphia's smart set caught the cool summer breezes in a tranquil setting. And it wasn't Atlantic City. A closer vacation spot - a train ride away - had many of the same amenities as the Jersey Shore: posh hotels, a boardwalk, golf links, riding stables, tennis courts, spiffy downtown shops. It was Media. What is today Delaware County's seat of government and jurisprudence, the Borough of Media, was a resort area almost from the day it was incorporated in 1850.
NEWS
September 8, 1989 | By Sandra D. Davis, Special to the Daily News
In a 1940s snapshot, Detroiter Sunnie Wilson and his friend, boxing champ Joe Louis, stand side by side, marveling at the splendor of Idlewild and the calmness of Idlewild Lake. Back then, this resort community four hours northwest of Detroit was known as the Black Eden, the Apollo of the North, the Black Las Vegas. It was the place where blacks enjoyed recreation and culture away from racial hatred. And each year thousands of blacks from Detroit, Cleveland, Chicago, St. Louis and points beyond could hardly wait for Michigan's north to thaw so that they could escape to this all-black recreational haven.
SPORTS
September 8, 1996 | By Joe Logan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you've been waiting for another upscale championship resort course to play while vacationing at the Shore, it has arrived in Harbor Pines Country Club. Open only six weeks, Harbor Pines is the latest addition to daily-fee golf at the Shore, and, though not the second coming of Galloway National, it's a welcome addition. Weaving through mature pines and hardwoods, as well as around a nature preserve, Harbor Pines is a midlength course (6,478 yards from the blue tees) that challenges better golfers, yet it won't overwhelm mid- and even high-handicappers.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Around the turn of the century, John T. Dorrance, his pockets bulging with the money he had amassed from his invention of canned condensed soup, decided that it was time to spend summers on Mount Desert Island, Maine. His decision was not universally acclaimed. One summer resident who took a dim view was Mary Howard Sturgis, grandmother of Robert Montgomery Scott. "In effect," said Scott, president of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, "she said, 'There goes the neighborhood.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - When Curtis Bashaw and his resort company took on the restoration of historic Congress Hall in the early 2000s, even his closest friends thought he had a screw loose. "A lot of people thought this was just never going to work . . . that it was just too big of a project to ever be successful," Bashaw said. "Friends tried to talk us out of doing it. People even went to City Council to try to stop it from happening. " It wasn't the first time locals doubted the prudence of the place.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
A pest-control company has agreed to pay $10 million in penalties for using a dangerous pesticide at a U.S. Virgin Islands resort where a Delaware family fell critically ill, federal prosecutors said Tuesday. Terminix International Co. LP and its U.S. Virgin Islands operation agreed to plead guilty to four counts of violating federal pesticide law in a deal with prosecutors that still needs to be approved by a judge. According to information filed Tuesday in the U.S. District Court of the Virgin Islands, the Wilmington family was staying at the Sirenusa resort in St. John last March when they were exposed to methyl bromide, which had been sprayed in an adjacent unit.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
September 11, 2016 | By Sally A. Downey, For The Inquirer
Beth Goldwater grew up summering in a recreational resort community in the Poconos. She joined the children's swim team there and competed in pools at nearby resorts, most of which had been developed in the mid-20th century with modest, chalet-style homes around man-made lakes. One resort, Buck Hill Falls, was older, grander, and more beautiful, Beth remembers. "Why don't we live here?" she wondered. It had an Olympic-size pool and much more. There were rocky cliffs, running creeks, a dramatic waterfall, woodlands of rhododendron and hemlock, and splendid stone mansions set into the sides of the hills.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Staff Writer
CAPE MAY - When Curtis Bashaw and his resort company took on the restoration of historic Congress Hall in the early 2000s, even his closest friends thought he had a screw loose. "A lot of people thought this was just never going to work . . . that it was just too big of a project to ever be successful," Bashaw said. "Friends tried to talk us out of doing it. People even went to City Council to try to stop it from happening. " It wasn't the first time locals doubted the prudence of the place.
NEWS
April 12, 2016
The Daily News Pet of the Week is Fiji, a nice terrier mix, about 4-to-6 years old, at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Fiji is in need of the confidence that having a permanent home would provide. She is slow to warm up to strangers, but improving daily in the shelter. Fiji could live with cats and older children. To adopt Fiji, contact PAWS at dogs@phillypaws.org or 215-298-9680, ext. 16, prior to visiting the shelter. Please provide her tag number, A31043451, when inquiring.
NEWS
March 31, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
A pest-control company has agreed to pay $10 million in penalties for using a dangerous pesticide at a U.S. Virgin Islands resort where a Delaware family fell critically ill, federal prosecutors said Tuesday. Terminix International Co. LP and its U.S. Virgin Islands operation agreed to plead guilty to four counts of violating federal pesticide law in a deal with prosecutors that still needs to be approved by a judge. According to information filed Tuesday in the U.S. District Court of the Virgin Islands, the Wilmington family was staying at the Sirenusa resort in St. John last March when they were exposed to methyl bromide, which had been sprayed in an adjacent unit.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal and Caitlin McCabe, STAFF WRITERS
As he snapped on his skis Wednesday afternoon, Garrett Burch looked side to side and saw no one else. Here it was, almost the second week of January, and Burch was poised to be the very first customer of the season at Spring Mountain. The wait had been excruciating. "I've almost been having to take sedatives," said the 61-year-old Skippack man. After record-setting temperatures heated Pennsylvania last month, the state's 20 slopes are only now gaining steam. Like Spring Mountain in Schwenksville, Montgomery County, most are opening later than they have in decades, battling not just lost time, but millions of dollars of lost revenue, and leaving hundreds of seasonal employees out of work.
NEWS
June 3, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
YOU CAN STILL go to the Poconos for love. Thanks to Morris Wilkins, you can still soak in heart-shaped bathtubs at some resorts, and drop into a gurgling, 7-foot-tall Jacuzzi shaped like a champagne glass just big enough for two. It was Wilkins who back in the late 1950s hit upon the idea of developing a resort restricted to couples, preferably honeymooners. His innovations to encourage the free expression of love among his guests earned him nationwide publicity, a booming business and many imitators.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty, For The Inquirer
STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. - For the last few years, ski resorts in cowboy country - and the skiers who love them - have been riding a bucking bronc. Huge dumps of snow blanketed slopes in the up years; in down years, late snow and warmer days cast a pall over the industry. At Steamboat Resort, in western Colorado, hard-core skiers were over the moon in 2008 when monster storms dropped 433 inches of snow on the slopes. But disbelief followed when the next winter brought fewer, weaker storms and half as much snow.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writers
Gov. Christie on Monday said the closing of multiple casinos in Atlantic City was "inevitable" given increased competition, but sought to blunt talk of the demise of this struggling resort town. Yet, big changes could come, including an expansion of gaming into North Jersey and greater state involvement in Atlantic City's government. Christie didn't share many details from the meeting, but when asked about those two ideas, which have been brought up by a key lawmaker, he responded: "Everything is on the table.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - With the noisy construction site of the Bass Pro Shops outlet at The Walk as a backdrop, Mayor Don Guardian on Friday tried to put a positive spin on the announcement that Caesars Entertainment will close the Showboat Casino in August and put thousands more casino workers out of a job in the already beleaguered gambling resort. "Atlantic City's best days are still ahead of us," Guardian told a gathering of media in a dirt lot next to the site where the sporting-goods center is due to open next year.
NEWS
April 7, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Just so you know, this story is not for the squeamish. It's about the therapeutic power of poop, a concept that is, we admit, both repulsive and fascinating. Specifically, it's about using one person's "donation" to cure another's Clostridium difficile , a potentially fatal bacterial infection that is growing more common and virulent. The beneficial bacteria from a healthy person's gut can subdue the bad germs growing like crazy in a sick one's digestive system, even if many rounds of expensive antibiotics have failed.
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