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Respiratory Distress Syndrome

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NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Somehow, Frank Cannon just knew his son didn't die of double pneumonia, as the death certificate said. Tim Cannon had been young and strong, after all, and when he lay unconscious in Abington Memorial Hospital in 1988 after his car hit a tree and his chest hit the steering wheel, the doctors told Frank that youth was on Tim's side. But Tim Cannon, who was 27, never left the hospital, never got to hang his just-earned MBA on the wall, never got to propose to his sweetheart.
NEWS
September 12, 1996 | By Daniel Q. Haney, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Stacey Burling contributed to this article
Doctors can rescue critically ill premature babies from almost certain death by filling their feeble, underdeveloped lungs with oxygen-rich liquid for a few days to restore their breathing. The babies breathe through the liquid, which takes the place of air until it gradually evaporates. A pilot study on 13 babies, weighing about 2 pounds, was remarkably successful: Seven survived without serious lung damage, mental retardation, or any of the other ill effects common in extremely small infants.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
Like many people, Frank and Anne Cannon of Chalfont had never heard of adult respiratory distress syndrome before their son Timothy contracted it. To help get over their grief when Timothy died three years ago, the Cannons and their five other sons set up the RDS Foundation, the first nonprofit foundation in the world that raises money to finance research of the disease. Now, the name of Timothy Cannon has become even more widely associated with the fight against the disease.
NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Discovery Laboratories Inc., of Warrington, Bucks County, said Friday that W. Thomas Amick, 70, had resigned as chief executive officer and chairman of the board. John Cooper, 54, who was executive vice president and chief financial officer, will now serve as president, CFO and join the board of directors. After years of work, Discovery Labs got FDA approval in 2012 for Surfaxin, a medication to help prevent respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants who are at high risk of developing RDS. The company will begin selling that in the second quarter of 2013.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Timothy Cannon's family was bewildered by his untimely death almost two years ago. Although he had been seriously injured when his car struck a tree in Lower Gwynedd, doctors had assured the Chalfont family that the 27-year-old had youth on his side and would very likely recover. As he remained unconscious in the trauma unit at Abington Memorial Hospital, his mother, Anne Cannon, monitored his demise by counting the number of medical devices around his bed. Nineteen pieces of equipment were running just prior to his death, 21 days after the June 15, 1988, accident.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
Waffles and sausage for breakfast fuel the engine of Makal, 5, who weighs 53 pounds and is built like a pint-size football player. He needs the energy to run outside, jump on a bike with training wheels, and go racing from the driveway to the back yard and around again. Then he'll go on the swings and slide, get a pal to play ball with him (occasionally one of them will actually catch a throw), and shoot baskets with a soft rubber basketball. No one is claiming that it's written in stone that Makal's going to be an athlete.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
Breathing. It's the most effortless thing we do. But for an infant born two or three months early, every breath is an intense, labored struggle. Some, for lack of oxygen, end up with brain damage. Some die. An experimental drug now affords hope to these infants, and Saint Mary Hospital in Langhorne has become the first in Bucks County to use it. An infant's first attempts at breathing are like "inflating a balloon," explained Prem Marlapudi, director of neonatal services at Saint Mary's.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Cooper Hospital opened its neonatal intensive care unit 19 years ago, ideas about how to care for sick babies were different. Medical professionals were believed to hold the knowledge and, therefore, took primary responsibility for caring for the infants. Parents were relegated to a secondary role. Over the years, those ideas have evolved. Now, parents are encouraged to partake in every possible aspect of the child's care from the outset, including feeding, cuddling, and spending the night with their babies.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Kathleen Thomas, pregnant with her first child, didn't worry when the pains began that day in early August. She knew the baby wasn't due until November. But the pains didn't stop. "Girl, you're in labor," Thomas' mother told her. On Aug. 6, 13 weeks before her due date, 23-year-old Thomas delivered a baby girl at Temple University Hospital. The baby, Christina, with a full head of dark hair, weighed a scant 737 grams - 1-pound, 10-ounces. She was slightly longer than her mother's hand.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ammie West's daughter, Reed, was born two years ago with hyaline membrane disease, a condition in which the lungs are underdeveloped. The baby almost died. West thought it was just one of those things until about a year ago, when two friends gave birth to children with medical problems, one with the same disease - also called respiratory distress syndrome - and the other with severe anemia. "I couldn't get over the fact that both babies were in (intensive care) at the same time and that mine had been in the ICU for 11 days," West said.
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NEWS
January 5, 2013 | By David Sell, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Discovery Laboratories Inc., of Warrington, Bucks County, said Friday that W. Thomas Amick, 70, had resigned as chief executive officer and chairman of the board. John Cooper, 54, who was executive vice president and chief financial officer, will now serve as president, CFO and join the board of directors. After years of work, Discovery Labs got FDA approval in 2012 for Surfaxin, a medication to help prevent respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants who are at high risk of developing RDS. The company will begin selling that in the second quarter of 2013.
NEWS
January 16, 1999 | By Shannon O'Boye, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Cooper Hospital opened its neonatal intensive care unit 19 years ago, ideas about how to care for sick babies were different. Medical professionals were believed to hold the knowledge and, therefore, took primary responsibility for caring for the infants. Parents were relegated to a secondary role. Over the years, those ideas have evolved. Now, parents are encouraged to partake in every possible aspect of the child's care from the outset, including feeding, cuddling, and spending the night with their babies.
NEWS
September 12, 1996 | By Daniel Q. Haney, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Stacey Burling contributed to this article
Doctors can rescue critically ill premature babies from almost certain death by filling their feeble, underdeveloped lungs with oxygen-rich liquid for a few days to restore their breathing. The babies breathe through the liquid, which takes the place of air until it gradually evaporates. A pilot study on 13 babies, weighing about 2 pounds, was remarkably successful: Seven survived without serious lung damage, mental retardation, or any of the other ill effects common in extremely small infants.
NEWS
July 3, 1994 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ammie West's daughter, Reed, was born two years ago with hyaline membrane disease, a condition in which the lungs are underdeveloped. The baby almost died. West thought it was just one of those things until about a year ago, when two friends gave birth to children with medical problems, one with the same disease - also called respiratory distress syndrome - and the other with severe anemia. "I couldn't get over the fact that both babies were in (intensive care) at the same time and that mine had been in the ICU for 11 days," West said.
NEWS
October 3, 1993 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Somehow, Frank Cannon just knew his son didn't die of double pneumonia, as the death certificate said. Tim Cannon had been young and strong, after all, and when he lay unconscious in Abington Memorial Hospital in 1988 after his car hit a tree and his chest hit the steering wheel, the doctors told Frank that youth was on Tim's side. But Tim Cannon, who was 27, never left the hospital, never got to hang his just-earned MBA on the wall, never got to propose to his sweetheart.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | By Glenn Berkey, Special to The Inquirer
Like many people, Frank and Anne Cannon of Chalfont had never heard of adult respiratory distress syndrome before their son Timothy contracted it. To help get over their grief when Timothy died three years ago, the Cannons and their five other sons set up the RDS Foundation, the first nonprofit foundation in the world that raises money to finance research of the disease. Now, the name of Timothy Cannon has become even more widely associated with the fight against the disease.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | By Paddy Noyes, Special to The Inquirer
Waffles and sausage for breakfast fuel the engine of Makal, 5, who weighs 53 pounds and is built like a pint-size football player. He needs the energy to run outside, jump on a bike with training wheels, and go racing from the driveway to the back yard and around again. Then he'll go on the swings and slide, get a pal to play ball with him (occasionally one of them will actually catch a throw), and shoot baskets with a soft rubber basketball. No one is claiming that it's written in stone that Makal's going to be an athlete.
NEWS
July 1, 1990 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
Timothy Cannon's family was bewildered by his untimely death almost two years ago. Although he had been seriously injured when his car struck a tree in Lower Gwynedd, doctors had assured the Chalfont family that the 27-year-old had youth on his side and would very likely recover. As he remained unconscious in the trauma unit at Abington Memorial Hospital, his mother, Anne Cannon, monitored his demise by counting the number of medical devices around his bed. Nineteen pieces of equipment were running just prior to his death, 21 days after the June 15, 1988, accident.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
Breathing. It's the most effortless thing we do. But for an infant born two or three months early, every breath is an intense, labored struggle. Some, for lack of oxygen, end up with brain damage. Some die. An experimental drug now affords hope to these infants, and Saint Mary Hospital in Langhorne has become the first in Bucks County to use it. An infant's first attempts at breathing are like "inflating a balloon," explained Prem Marlapudi, director of neonatal services at Saint Mary's.
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Kathleen Thomas, pregnant with her first child, didn't worry when the pains began that day in early August. She knew the baby wasn't due until November. But the pains didn't stop. "Girl, you're in labor," Thomas' mother told her. On Aug. 6, 13 weeks before her due date, 23-year-old Thomas delivered a baby girl at Temple University Hospital. The baby, Christina, with a full head of dark hair, weighed a scant 737 grams - 1-pound, 10-ounces. She was slightly longer than her mother's hand.
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