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Respite Care

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NEWS
July 30, 1987 | By John Kromer
For many of the families of the 220,000 Pennsylvanians who suffer from Alzheimer's disease, respite care services can provide the support needed to sustain a patient at home and to delay for as long as possible the more costly alternative of institutionalization. Yet, until this year, respite care has not been given the degree of legislative support that it deserves as an efficient, cost-effective strategy for long-term care in Pennsylvania. Respite care may be defined as any service that provides the care giver of a functionally impaired person with relief from routine care-giving responsibilities.
LIVING
June 1, 1986 | By Susan Nagler Perloff, Special to The Inquirer
If it's time for a week in Waikiki or business in Birmingham, what can you do for the aging parent or grandparent who lives at home with you and requires constant, attentive, loving vigilance? The elderly relative whose vision and memory are less clear than they once were, who might be trusted to cook meals but not necessarily to remember to turn off the stove? Until recently, special programs for dependent individuals were rare. Now, as the aging population increases and the demand for hospital beds decreases, at least two Philadelphia area hospitals have created special units to provide safe "respite" care.
NEWS
June 23, 1986
I firmly believe that justice will have been served on William Ecenbarger for his shortsightedness reflected in the June 8 Inquirer Magazine article "Do the elderly have it too good" only when he eventually becomes frail and dependent on either respite care, homeworker service, home-delivered meals, domiciliary care, adult day care or other social services offered by underfunded community agencies that are operated by dedicated and underpaid staff...
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The county's Office of Aging last week froze admissions to four programs that serve the elderly and their families, saying it doesn't have enough money to maintain services even at their current levels. The affected programs are day care for the elderly, personal care, attendant care and respite care. The personal- and attendant-care programs offer help in daily activities such as bathing and dressing. Day care and respite care provide relief for family members who care for elderly relatives, said Margaret Woodlief, director of the Office of Aging.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The Camden County Chapter of the American Red Cross is offering two courses this month for people responsible for the care of elderly people at home. "As Parents Grow Older" and "Informal Caregiver Training Program" were developed by Norma Weisman, director of health-care services for the Camden County Chapter. The courses are taught by a registered nurse and a social worker, according to Sue Rosoff, respite-care coordinator for the chapter. The courses are open to county residents and nonresidents.
NEWS
April 28, 2012 | By Alex Wayne, Bloomberg News
New Jersey is being asked to pay back $61 million in federal Medicaid reimbursements because the state has not documented whether some services claimed for disabled people were provided, U.S. government auditors said. The overbilling happened from 2005 to 2007 in a program that provides home care for mentally and physically disabled people, auditors at the Health and Human Services Department's Office of Inspector General said in a report today. The state billed the federal government $1.4 billion for the program during the period.
NEWS
January 27, 1992 | By Peter Landry, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Every adult whose folks are old, and every child whose parents will be, faces The Decision. It's never easy. Harriet Scheckter knows. She remembers precisely how the parent became the child, how she became the mother to her mother, how it felt like the beginning of goodbye. The emotional baggage of a lifetime colored The Decision. Guilt. Obligation. Need. Responsibility. It was 1986. Her mother, Harriet Wexlin, was 89 and Scheckter, an only child, was 67. In 67 years, they had never lived apart.
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | By Louise Harbach, Special to The Inquirer
For Diane and Wayne Crawley, the word respite means that sometimes they get to go out together. For their daughter Dawn, the word respite has come to mean a new friend. And for the South Jersey office of the Epilepsy Foundation of New Jersey, which serves families in Camden, Burlington and Gloucester Counties, the "respite" - actually the new respite care service it offers - has been declared a success by those who use it. The program, started last month by the Camden-based foundation, provides up to 40 hours of free care each month for severely disabled, multi-handicapped children who are subject to uncontrolled seizures.
NEWS
October 5, 1989 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
As a newly trained health-care aide, Laura Gimenez thought she was prepared to handle just about anything. Then one day, more than a year ago, she took an Alzheimer's patient for a short walk. The patient, an elderly Italian woman who spoke no English, started to undress half a block away from her house. The woman had shimmied out of her underwear and started to take off her skirt before Gimenez could stop her and get her back to the house. "I was able only to hold her dress and make her walk," Gimenez said last week as she recounted how startled she had been by the incident.
NEWS
August 11, 1999
Are you interested in obtaining home-based care for an elderly or disabled loved one, but unable to afford it? Hope you don't live in Pennsylvania. According to one expert, the state ranks dead last in America in shifting the emphasis from nursing homes to home- and community-based care. In other states, including New Jersey, officials are doing more to keep low- and moderate-income elderly and disabled in such settings. Gov. Whitman, for instance, has earmarked $60 million in new money this year for such services.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 2, 2015
D EAR ABBY: Our family dog recently passed away after a yearlong decline. I had grown up with him. He had reached the point where he needed daily care for his body, even though his mind was 100 percent there. Near the end, things got very bad. I got only about four hours of broken sleep a night caring for him, and no one in the family would help me. During part of his daily care routine, he had a second accident all over the freshly cleaned floor. I lost it and hit him. He's gone now, and I can barely live with myself.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2015 | By Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
Darlene wasn't looking for a husband. But she was a caregiver, by profession and by nature, and one of her home health-aide clients was McKinley's grandmother. "It was an automatic spark," he says. "I didn't even know her. But I left my parents' house, got a sandwich and came right back. Then, every time she came there to care for my grandmother, I made sure I was there. " For Darlene, the spark was slower to catch. Divorced just two years, with three children under 11, she felt wary.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
IMAGINE someone with chest pain, vomiting, sweats and shortness of breath being turned away from a hospital because there's no bed. And imagine the public outcry if he later died of a heart attack. Now, imagine a young man in the grip of psychosis being turned away from a psychiatric facility because there's no bed. And imagine that he stabbed his father and killed himself the next day. That's hardly unthinkable: It's exactly what happened last month when the son of Virginia state Sen. Creigh Deeds was sent home from a psychiatric hospital because there was no bed. The next day, he stabbed his father and killed himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have an aging father with a health condition that is likely terminal, with few treatment options. I live far away from him and my mother, and my half-siblings don't make much of an effort to see him. My parents are left with little social support and so many painful unknowns. My mother especially has completely neglected her own health in caring for him. I've been turning myself inside out, using all my spare vacation time to see them (the only thing that seems to help their spirits)
NEWS
April 28, 2012 | By Alex Wayne, Bloomberg News
New Jersey is being asked to pay back $61 million in federal Medicaid reimbursements because the state has not documented whether some services claimed for disabled people were provided, U.S. government auditors said. The overbilling happened from 2005 to 2007 in a program that provides home care for mentally and physically disabled people, auditors at the Health and Human Services Department's Office of Inspector General said in a report today. The state billed the federal government $1.4 billion for the program during the period.
NEWS
October 21, 2007 | By Walter F. Naedele INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martha McKim had some appreciation for the work of the nurses attending her at a new hospice in West Chester. She was a lifelong nurse, though she didn't make a career of treating terminally ill folks like her. The closest she came to end-of-life work was as an Army nurse in the South Pacific during World War II. But there, on New Guinea, she was not near the front lines, as were nurses shown in the PBS series The War. She and...
NEWS
October 13, 2005
Aid for older suburbanites in their homes The Inquirer series "Aging in the suburbs" was very informative, shedding much-needed light on many of the problems that aging baby boomers will experience all too soon, if they haven't already. Jewish Family and Children's Service of Southern New Jersey was pleased that Jennifer Weiss, our director of senior services, was prominently quoted in the Oct. 3 article, "A lonely struggle to care for loved ones. " We would like to add that our agency offers practical solutions to many of the problems highlighted in the article.
NEWS
February 16, 2005 | By Elisa Ung INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dolores Wasdick spent seven years visiting the sick and answering phones for the volunteer service group Interfaith Caregivers of Haddonfield. But when two hip surgeries left her physically limited, Wasdick, 72, knew where she could call for a ride to the grocery store. "The tide has turned, and now I need help," Wasdick said. "They've been really wonderful. " In Haddonfield and Haddon Heights, anchored by many active churches, the volunteers of Interfaith Caregivers deliver on their faith in quiet, pragmatic ways: If you live or worship in the two towns, they'll drive you to errands or sit with you while your caregiver runs to the market, call you if you're homebound and ill, help you fill out confusing forms, or read to you if you can't see well.
NEWS
July 1, 2004 | By Judy Downing
When people ask about my job these days, I respond, "I work at the House of the Four Babies. " It is neither a children's clothing store nor a house with quadruplets. This, instead, is the home of a family specially trained and qualified to care for medically fragile foster children, otherwise known as a Special Home Service Provider home. As a pediatrics registered nurse working part time through a home-health agency, I monitor and care for the children when their foster mother, Lydia, goes for her monthly respite hours.
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