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Response Time

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NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Karl Stark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ambulances responding to a triple shooting Tuesday night in Falls Township took about a half-hour to reach the scene, mostly because there were fears that an armed gunman was still prowling the Pennwood Crossing mobile home park. Those fears proved unfounded, and the delay deeply angered Pauline Bubnis, whose husband, John, and daughter-in-law, Michelle Diethorne, were critically wounded in the attack. "My husband lay in the street and my stepdaughter lay in my baby's room bleeding, and it took them (a long time)
NEWS
June 20, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Delanco School District and the township's Police Department have resolved a disagreement over the time police take to respond to disturbances on school property. After meeting with Mayor Robert Bellan, Police Chief Edmund Parsons and other police officers, school board officials said the two sides had agreed on a way to avert such disputes: better communication. In addition, the board acknowledged that school officials had miscalculated the Police Department's reaction time to problems on school-owned recreational grounds, especially the basketball courts and ball fields near the Walnut Street Middle School.
NEWS
August 19, 1997 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Neal says he's witnessed striking gains in his department's performance since he implemented a long-sought work schedule for officers, but Town Watch volunteers and the police union don't see much difference. One Town Watch group even says response time is slightly slower since the change. Neal says arrests, car stops and traffic citations are up dramatically since he put the new shifts in place last December, after winning a battle with the police union he had waged for several years.
NEWS
November 17, 1995 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Police response time slowed measurably over the first two years of the Rendell administration for almost all types of crimes, a city controller's report says. Rendell administration officials say that's true, but insist they're doing better this year. A controller's office comparison of 911 logs revealed that for "priority 1" calls - mostly serious crimes in progress - average response times slowed by 11 percent, from 6 minutes 34 seconds in 1992 to 7 minutes 16 seconds in 1994.
NEWS
August 15, 1995 | By Glen Justice, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The average response time for an ambulance in Delaware County from dispatch to arrival was 5 minutes and 37 seconds for the first six months of this year, according to statistics released by County Councilman Thomas H. Killion yesterday. The numbers were released in response to recent allegations by activists that county ambulance service is slow, especially in Chester. The Rev. Norman E. Gant, an outspoken critic of the council on issues ranging from the environment to affirmative action, has led the charge.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | By Mary Anne Janco, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Aston Beechwood Fire Company made its case for a new firehouse Tuesday night to a generally sympathetic audience who live near the proposed site - a tract off Aston Mills Road owned by the Sisters of St. Francis. At the same time, some residents at the meeting at Our Lady of Angels Convent expressed concerns about noise, traffic and the proposed size of the project. "As we proceed with negotiations, it's important for us to know how the potential relocation of the firehouse would impact the rest of the neighbors," said Sister Arlene McDonough, who has been coordinating the negotiations.
NEWS
January 12, 1997 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Faster emergency medical service for residents of Lindenwold, Pine Hill and Clementon is the goal of a plan to form a regional ambulance squad in cooperation with Kennedy Memorial Hospitals-University Medical Center/Stratford Division. Under the plan, officials said, Lindenwold and Pine Hill would each have an ambulance staffed seven days a week by professional crews from Kennedy - from 4 a.m. to 4 p.m. in one borough and from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. in the other, on a rotating basis.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two years ago, Tredyffrin officials were warned by the Chester County Department of Emergency Services that they had a problem - not only did two different roads have the same name, Weadley, but both roads had the same numbering system. Some residents pleaded for changes. Others urged the supervisors to do nothing - and that's what the supervisors chose to do. Early last Friday, a fire erupted in a house in the 600 block of Weadley Road near Eagle School Road, killing the lone resident, Dorothy Smith.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | By Nicole Barnes, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Concerned by what they say is a policy that makes firefighters vulnerable to injuries, volunteers for the Fire Department want the City Council to approve a four-minute delay in response time. Capt. Ron Sigismonti Jr., who has served as a volunteer since the mid-1990s, said the policy allows one person from the city's two fire stations to respond to a fire, arriving ahead of other firefighters. There is usually one paid firefighter on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at each station.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years ago, City Controller Alan Butkovitz released a report revealing a Philadelphia EMS system in crisis: Sick people waiting too long for ambulances; paramedics dangerously overworked; and non-emergency calls overwhelming the system. The report echoed the pleas of paramedics who had long called for change, and recommended steps to relieve pressure on the stressed 911 system. Four years later, little has changed, Butkovitz said Wednesday as he released a follow-up audit that analyzed Fire Department data from 2009.
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NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Tom Avril and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
On a Thursday afternoon in early May, AlDora Sample was gasping for breath. She called 911 a few minutes past 5 p.m. from her home in Camden. But the paramedic squad stationed in the city was tending to a drug overdose, so the dispatcher summoned a team from three miles away, in Pennsauken. At rush hour, it took the medics more than 12 minutes to get to Sample's tan-sided house on Ware Street. Was that fast enough? Emergency medicine experts say evaluating a paramedic service based on its response times is a tricky proposition at best, depending on the type of emergency, geography, and other factors.
NEWS
July 15, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
DONNY SMITH, president of the Mayfair Civic Association, wants to split the sprawling 15th Police District into two districts, with a guaranteed number of officers patrolling each neighborhood. Right now, Smith said, the quieter neighborhoods like his suffer quality-of-life crimes, such as theft when cops are busy responding to the 15th's high-crime areas. "We're a blue-collar neighborhood," Smith said. "People are at work all day. They don't want to come home to find their house was broken into because there aren't enough police patrolling the streets here.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, VINNY VELLA & DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writers zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IT WOULD HAVE been impossible for firefighters to arrive any quicker at Saturday's devastating blaze on Gesner Street that claimed the lives of four young children. That's the message that Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer wanted heard loud and clear yesterday as the city, in an unusual move, released 9-1-1 recordings and a list of GPS-tracked response times of the first four companies to arrive on the block in the Elmwood section of Southwest Philadelphia. "You cannot get there quicker than a minute," Sawyer said, referring to the time between when a firefighter from Ladder 4, around the corner from the fire, notified dispatchers that the ladder truck was heading there and when the truck arrived on the block at 2:48 a.m. "That's not humanly possible," he said.
NEWS
January 9, 2013 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer 215-854-4172, walshse@phillynews.com
ON A RECENT weekday, two paramedics sat on the cots they almost never have time to sleep on at their neighborhood fire station. Their shift had just begun, and they jokingly bet on how many runs they'd make that day. But before they could finish the thought, a bell rang. First run. Time to go. They hopped into their ambulance, hit the sirens and raced to the scene. Someone had reported a man who was high on drugs, and the paramedics persuaded him to climb in the ambulance and go with them to the hospital.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four years ago, City Controller Alan Butkovitz released a report revealing a Philadelphia EMS system in crisis: Sick people waiting too long for ambulances; paramedics dangerously overworked; and non-emergency calls overwhelming the system. The report echoed the pleas of paramedics who had long called for change, and recommended steps to relieve pressure on the stressed 911 system. Four years later, little has changed, Butkovitz said Wednesday as he released a follow-up audit that analyzed Fire Department data from 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My husband lost his job and hasn't found anything yet. We have had to cancel some plans, aren't giving gifts on gift-giving occasions, and weren't able to contribute any cash to some group family things we'd previously committed to (family is paying our portion now). We've also gotten some unasked-for but much-appreciated help from parents in the way of groceries. We do have a small amount of savings we have not yet dipped into, for mortgage payments when my husband's unemployment payments run out. I feel horribly guilty spending any money on anything.
NEWS
August 2, 2011 | BY JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
LAST AUGUST, just five days after the start of a city policy of rolling brownouts at selected fire stations to save money, a 12-year-old boy with autism died in a raging fire in his West Philadelphia home. Although there is no evidence that Frank Marasco's death was a direct result of the city's brownout plan - in which about three fire stations are temporarily closed once a week on a rotational basis to save $3.8 million in overtime - his untimely death set off a heated debate about the city's cuts.
NEWS
August 13, 2010
I LIVE IN North Philly. I have lived in this area for more than 50 years. My home was broken into and it was ransacked and robbed about four times last week. I was pushed back inside my home and robbed twice on Sunday. I reported this to the Philadelphia police and they were on the case in a hurry. In less than a week they caught the robber in my home who had just broken into it again. Now he is back in jail and my neighbor and I can finally rest peacefully in our own homes after several years of torment.
NEWS
April 10, 2008 | By Kal Rudman
I remember Camden. I remember working at WCAM radio from 1959 to 1962 on the top floor of City Hall. I remember the short walk to the shops and the theaters. My favorite was the Stanley Theater at Broadway and Market Street. Back in 1926, when the movies were silent, it cost $1 million to build. It was a palace that featured both movies and stage shows. It was a time when a quarter would buy you singers, dancers and plate spinners, as well as a double feature straight from Hollywood.
NEWS
March 27, 2008 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
The Philadelphia Fire Department is hard at work hiring paramedics, Commissioner Lloyd Ayers said yesterday. But City Council members considering his agency's annual budget were clearly impatient with the pace, since understaffing has been a significant problem. Mayor Nutter budgeted $3.9 million more for the fiscal year that starts July 1 to help the department hire more paramedics and put more medic units on city streets. Ayers told Council that he is short 31 paramedics now but has the money to hire 80 more, meaning he could hire 111 if his department could find them.
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