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Responsibilities

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NEWS
July 4, 1993 | By AMITAI ETZIONI
The Founding Fathers did not bother to write down a bill of particulars for our social responsibilities to match the Bill of Rights. In the days of closely knit communities and religiously committed individuals, one's responsibilities were all too clear - it was rights that needed enshrining. However, as public opinion polls keep reminding us, it seems we have come full circle - rights are now taken for granted while responsibilities are shirked. A study has shown that young Americans expect to be tried before a jury of their peers but are rather reluctant to serve on one. A survey of youth conducted by the People for the American Way found that, when asked what was special about the United States, the young people responded: "Individualism and the fact that it is a democracy and you can do whatever you want.
SPORTS
December 13, 2001 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Erika Messam takes the court, she carries with her a lengthy to-do checklist of responsibilities in her mind. Need a clutch rebound? The 5-foot-8 senior from Pemberton delivers. A three-point basket? Knock it down and cross it off the list. Running the fastbreak, dishing off to the open player or provide leadership to the younger athletes? Check. Check. Check. Accomplishing all those things is tough enough for one player, but it's amazing stuff when you consider Messam is listed as a point guard.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | By KIM SORVIG
America's founders never had junior-high Civics. The Constitution shows this quite clearly. Somehow, its authors missed a social message almost as ubiquitous as "wash your hands before eating" (and equally unpopular among adolescents): "Rights bring responsibilities. " The founders gave no voice to that basic social equation. America has a brilliant, 200-year-old Bill of Rights, but no comparable, complementary Bill of Responsibilities. The founders elevated our rights to be part of the nation's highest law, but citizens' responsibilities are spelled out by laws and policies far below the constitutional level, as if they were minor details to be bartered and fiddled with to fit the moment.
NEWS
December 8, 2004
WHILE cracking down on scofflaws in Philadelphia, why don't we go after the fathers who owe thousands in child support while we're at it? Is it fair to penalize only careless drivers while letting careless, negligent so-called "dads" avoid their responsibilities to the children they helped bring into the world? Marilyn Cedeno Philadelphia
NEWS
April 13, 1997
Mother's Day is approaching, and we want to hear from you. Tell us what it's like to be a mom in 1997. How has motherhood changed since your mother raised you? What kind of responsibilities do you juggle? What are the greatest challenges? What are the greatest joys? Send essays to Community Voices at the address above.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | By Frank Spatocco
Many of us who volunteer time to a youth or community group never seem to realize the time spent year in and year out. Days fly, yet all we do is continue with our responsibilities, as we have chosen to get involved. Most of us work, sometimes two jobs, and have family responsibilities and other commitments. I guess there are many reasons we get involved. Maybe it's conscience, dedication, or just the enjoyment of working with kids. But it is not enough; we need more volunteers to take responsibility and reduce the workload.
NEWS
November 5, 1988
As technology has become more hyperactive, we the people have become more laid-back; as the deposits in its memory banks have become more fat, the deposits in man's memory bank have become more lean. Like Harold Pinter's servant, the machine has assumed the responsibilities that were once the master's. The latter has become the shell of a once thoughtful, though indolent, being. It is the Law Of Diminishing Enlightenment at work. - From the introduction to Studs Terkel's "The Great Divide"
NEWS
March 16, 2004
POOR PGW, crying again! Well, I don't want to hear it or pay more for it! My bill is already $250 a month! I am sick and tired of PGW. Granted, there are some PGW customers who could care less about paying their bill. I do my best to pay as much as I can every month. What about the people who do not qualify for any kind of assistance because they are not below poverty level but are middle-class and finding it hard to keep up? PGW, PECO and the Water Revenue Bureau are raising rates.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Gwynedd Township Commissioner Thomas Kemper has announced his resignation from the Board of Commissioners effective next Thursday. Kemper's term was due to expire Dec. 31, and he was not running for re-election. According to Township Manager Leonard Perrone, Kemper told the board that his increasing responsibilities at work would not leave him enough time to responsibly fill the position as commissioner. Kemper has served on the board since June 1984. Kenneth Kroberger is the only person running for Kemper's seat in the fall election.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 3, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Vatican is asking Catholics around the world how the church can better serve their families, but local response to Rome's questionnaire has been lackluster, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia reports. The Diocese of Camden, meanwhile, has rewritten the survey's dense language - what it calls "Vaticanese" - inspiring lively conversations in its parishes. The emphasis on families comes as the region prepares for the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia in September, which will be capped by a visit from Pope Francis.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Federal Transit Administration on Friday proposed new rules designed to improve safety on subways, trolleys, and light-rail systems. The proposed rules would replace existing regulations governing how states oversee rail transit safety. States would assume greater responsibility for overseeing transit, with FTA monitoring, and the FTA could impose financial penalties on states with inadquate safety programs, under the proposed rules. pnussbaum@phillynews.com 215-854-4587 @nussbaumpaul  
NEWS
December 29, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On Christmas Day in 2008, I attended early-morning Mass at the Al Qaleb Al Aqdas (Sacred Heart) Church, in the Karrada district of Baghdad. Although Christians had already become targets in Iraq's civil war and thousands had fled, the Chaldean Catholic church was filled with well-dressed families, and a choir sang near a large Christmas tree. Some worshipers continued on to a Santa Claus show in a nearby park. Those days are long gone. The number of Chaldeans (whose church dates to the early Christian era)
BUSINESS
December 15, 2014 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
What can a wronged consumer do to make a situation right? What's a reasonable response? What counts as an overreaction? Those are perennial questions with no simple answers facing anyone who deals with consumer problems. But two recent events highlight what you might call consumerism's Goldilocks problem - the risks of responses that are too hard or too soft. Too hard comes illustrated by Benjamin Edelman, a Harvard business professor and Internet researcher who was flamed across the Web last week for complaining about a $4 overcharge by a Chinese restaurant outside Boston.
SPORTS
December 11, 2014 | By Dick Jerardi, Daily News Columnist
ONE OF THE many things I have never understood is why exactly the head coach is responsible for everything his players have ever done, might contemplate doing or will eventually do. Perhaps I am just missing the point, but I really think the players should be responsible for what they do. Somehow, it has not evolved that way. Now, when a player does something stupid, and players will do stupid things, it is always the coach's fault. The coach should have detected during the recruiting process that a 17-year-old would eventually do something dumb.
SPORTS
October 15, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
THE UNION pulled an astounding choke on Saturday night. In a span of 5 minutes, it blew a 2-0 lead late against the Columbus Crew to lose, 3-2, and got eliminated from the Major League Soccer playoff race. You decide which of the following statements sounds closer to the truth: In June, when he fired manager John Hackworth and replaced him with current interim manager Jim Curtin, Union CEO Nick Sakiewicz said: "I think we have a lot of quality in our team. We're a good team; we have quality in the locker room.
NEWS
October 2, 2014
Global warming concerns aren't worth risking good coal, oil, and gas jobs so soon after the recession. We can put off action on global warming, but we'll pay a worse price in the end. Face reality and adapt. |Stephen M. Smith, Burlington City The long term risks to everyones' health far outweigh the short term goals of a few jobs in these types of energy that aren't clean. |JoAnn Williams, Media With the effects of climate change clearly apparent, action to mitigate it is urgent and can be taken in an economically feasible way. |Bill Fanshel, Bryn Mawr Seriously combating global warming with renewable fuel - wind, sea, sun - should enable us to replace those allegedly lost jobs without economic repercussions.
SPORTS
September 22, 2014 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
DeMeco Ryans was born and raised in Bessemer, Ala., a small industrial town in the center of the state. Its namesake invented a process to mass-produce steel, but it's perhaps best known now as the birthplace of Bo Jackson. When people talk about the child-abuse charges filed in Texas against Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson, about a culture that could empower a father to strike the inside of his 4-year-old son's legs with a tree branch until they bled, Bessemer is the kind of place they mean, where a boy's roughest justice could come at the hands of a parent.
NEWS
September 21, 2014 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
A string of weather stations will be placed near I-295 and rail lines to assist Gloucester County officials should an event like the 2012 Paulsboro train derailment and toxic leak occur again. The county Prosecutor's Office announced this week that it had secured $150,000 in funding to buy and maintain nine of the devices, which officials say can help them make critical decisions during emergencies. The stations can measure wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity, and barometric pressure.
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