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Responsibilities

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NEWS
July 4, 1993 | By AMITAI ETZIONI
The Founding Fathers did not bother to write down a bill of particulars for our social responsibilities to match the Bill of Rights. In the days of closely knit communities and religiously committed individuals, one's responsibilities were all too clear - it was rights that needed enshrining. However, as public opinion polls keep reminding us, it seems we have come full circle - rights are now taken for granted while responsibilities are shirked. A study has shown that young Americans expect to be tried before a jury of their peers but are rather reluctant to serve on one. A survey of youth conducted by the People for the American Way found that, when asked what was special about the United States, the young people responded: "Individualism and the fact that it is a democracy and you can do whatever you want.
SPORTS
December 13, 2001 | By Tom McGurk INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
When Erika Messam takes the court, she carries with her a lengthy to-do checklist of responsibilities in her mind. Need a clutch rebound? The 5-foot-8 senior from Pemberton delivers. A three-point basket? Knock it down and cross it off the list. Running the fastbreak, dishing off to the open player or provide leadership to the younger athletes? Check. Check. Check. Accomplishing all those things is tough enough for one player, but it's amazing stuff when you consider Messam is listed as a point guard.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | By KIM SORVIG
America's founders never had junior-high Civics. The Constitution shows this quite clearly. Somehow, its authors missed a social message almost as ubiquitous as "wash your hands before eating" (and equally unpopular among adolescents): "Rights bring responsibilities. " The founders gave no voice to that basic social equation. America has a brilliant, 200-year-old Bill of Rights, but no comparable, complementary Bill of Responsibilities. The founders elevated our rights to be part of the nation's highest law, but citizens' responsibilities are spelled out by laws and policies far below the constitutional level, as if they were minor details to be bartered and fiddled with to fit the moment.
NEWS
December 8, 2004
WHILE cracking down on scofflaws in Philadelphia, why don't we go after the fathers who owe thousands in child support while we're at it? Is it fair to penalize only careless drivers while letting careless, negligent so-called "dads" avoid their responsibilities to the children they helped bring into the world? Marilyn Cedeno Philadelphia
NEWS
April 13, 1997
Mother's Day is approaching, and we want to hear from you. Tell us what it's like to be a mom in 1997. How has motherhood changed since your mother raised you? What kind of responsibilities do you juggle? What are the greatest challenges? What are the greatest joys? Send essays to Community Voices at the address above.
NEWS
April 28, 1997 | By Frank Spatocco
Many of us who volunteer time to a youth or community group never seem to realize the time spent year in and year out. Days fly, yet all we do is continue with our responsibilities, as we have chosen to get involved. Most of us work, sometimes two jobs, and have family responsibilities and other commitments. I guess there are many reasons we get involved. Maybe it's conscience, dedication, or just the enjoyment of working with kids. But it is not enough; we need more volunteers to take responsibility and reduce the workload.
NEWS
November 5, 1988
As technology has become more hyperactive, we the people have become more laid-back; as the deposits in its memory banks have become more fat, the deposits in man's memory bank have become more lean. Like Harold Pinter's servant, the machine has assumed the responsibilities that were once the master's. The latter has become the shell of a once thoughtful, though indolent, being. It is the Law Of Diminishing Enlightenment at work. - From the introduction to Studs Terkel's "The Great Divide"
NEWS
March 16, 2004
POOR PGW, crying again! Well, I don't want to hear it or pay more for it! My bill is already $250 a month! I am sick and tired of PGW. Granted, there are some PGW customers who could care less about paying their bill. I do my best to pay as much as I can every month. What about the people who do not qualify for any kind of assistance because they are not below poverty level but are middle-class and finding it hard to keep up? PGW, PECO and the Water Revenue Bureau are raising rates.
NEWS
July 25, 1991 | By Laurie Halse Anderson, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Gwynedd Township Commissioner Thomas Kemper has announced his resignation from the Board of Commissioners effective next Thursday. Kemper's term was due to expire Dec. 31, and he was not running for re-election. According to Township Manager Leonard Perrone, Kemper told the board that his increasing responsibilities at work would not leave him enough time to responsibly fill the position as commissioner. Kemper has served on the board since June 1984. Kenneth Kroberger is the only person running for Kemper's seat in the fall election.
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NEWS
July 24, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
A central question in the debate over a Rutgers University-led study of the ocean floor off the coast of Long Beach Island is whether the loud sound waves used to map the sediment will harm dolphins, whales, and other animals. It is an area of scientific research that has been getting more attention since the mid-1990s, when researchers generated loud sounds in the Pacific Ocean to study the effect of water temperature on sound. People began to wonder whether marine mammals could hear the sound and, if so, if that was bad. Since then, scientists have trained some of the more intelligent species, such as dolphins, to tap a paddle when they hear a sound.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Borough of West Chester early this week won the latest episode in a years-long court battle with drugmaker Pfizer over sewer payments owed to the borough by Wyeth, the pharmaceutical company that Pfizer bought in 2009 for $68 billion. Chester County Court of Common Pleas Judge Robert J. Shenkin ruled that Pfizer must give the borough $1.72 million for missed payments under a 1984 agreement that called for Wyeth to make quarterly payments of about $200,000 for the life of the Goose Creek Sewer Treatment plant.
NEWS
July 10, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, VINNY VELLA & DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writers zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
IT WOULD HAVE been impossible for firefighters to arrive any quicker at Saturday's devastating blaze on Gesner Street that claimed the lives of four young children. That's the message that Fire Commissioner Derrick Sawyer wanted heard loud and clear yesterday as the city, in an unusual move, released 9-1-1 recordings and a list of GPS-tracked response times of the first four companies to arrive on the block in the Elmwood section of Southwest Philadelphia. "You cannot get there quicker than a minute," Sawyer said, referring to the time between when a firefighter from Ladder 4, around the corner from the fire, notified dispatchers that the ladder truck was heading there and when the truck arrived on the block at 2:48 a.m. "That's not humanly possible," he said.
NEWS
July 9, 2014 | By Mike Newall and Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writers
Residents of Southwest Philadelphia turned out in force Monday night to demand answers after the weekend fire that killed four children, at times sparking an angry outcry that drew scores of police officers and set the neighborhood on edge. The protest, which resulted in several clashes and led to a number of arrests, followed an afternoon community meeting at which residents challenged the fire commissioner over how long it took firefighters to respond to Saturday's devastating early morning fire.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
On May 1, Thurman and Elizabeth Harrison were awakened at 2:30 a.m. by a commotion on their tiny Center City street. Firefighters were evacuating residents after they measured alarming levels of carbon monoxide outside several homes. About an hour later, Thurman Harrison watched in disbelief from the end of the 2300 block of Naudain Street as an explosion reduced his neighbor's house to rubble in one fiery instant and destroyed the rowhouse where he and his wife had lived for 18 years.
SPORTS
June 13, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Columnist
THIS NEEDED clarification. Not only is it rare for a sports executive to publicly call out his players, but the comments Union CEO Nick Sakiewicz directed at his charges were so brutally harsh, you wanted to make sure they were in proper context. For any Union fan wondering why manager John Hackworth got sacked on Tuesday, Sakiewicz said to look no further than the guys in the locker room. "Yes, I will clarify," Sakiewicz said yesterday at a news conference introducing Jim Curtin as interim coach.
NEWS
May 21, 2014 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
The calls for ambulances kept coming and coming. People in Parkesburg, where Raymond Stackhouse lives, needed help. But the former chief of the Parkesburg Fire Company often had no volunteers to send. So the emergency passed to someone else. "It made us feel like we were failing the community," Stackhouse said. That was the spark that started the four-year process of forming the Keystone Valley Fire Department, a joining of the nearby fire companies of Parkesburg, Pomeroy, and Atglen.
REAL_ESTATE
May 19, 2014 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
If you're a Philadelphia schoolteacher, here's a lesson in real estate development: At Oxford Mills, educators can rent two-bedroom/two-bathroom loft apartments for the below-market rate of $1,500 a month. If you teach anywhere in the city - for the school district or for a private, parochial or charter school - you qualify to rent at Oxford Mills starting June 1. And if you operate a nonprofit affiliated with education, you can lease office space at a reduced rate. This mixed-use venture is one of several in formerly crime-ridden South Kensington, near Northern Liberties.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fatima Perez's family knew something was wrong when she didn't call Monday afternoon - as she did every day - to make sure someone had picked up her 7-year-old son, Dennis, from school. They reported her missing that afternoon to Camden County police, fearing that Perez, a 41-year-old mother from Nicaragua who works two jobs and had never gone missing before, was in danger. The police, Perez's family said, suggested that she had an unseen drug addiction. Or that she willfully left town with her landscaper, who was believed to be driving her from her Camden home to Delanco so she could buy a car. Neither was true, they said.
SPORTS
May 15, 2014 | By David Murphy, Daily News Staff Writer
THERE WAS no shortage of reactions in the wake of Michael Sam's televised draft-day kiss with his boyfriend, most of them falling into one of three categories: 1) Awwww 2) Ewwww 3) Mmmmm . . . cake There was, however, a fourth category of reaction, from a segment of parents who harbored concerns about how their children would react to watching an intimate display between two men on television (that these parents had no qualms subjecting their kids to Day 3 of the NFL draft tells us we still have plenty of work to do in raising awareness about early-childhood exposure to Mel Kiper, but that's a different issue)
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