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NEWS
August 9, 1994 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Carmela Strolli, who with her husband owned and operated the landmark South Philadelphia restaurant famed for its low prices and quality fare, died Sunday. She was 81 and lived in South Philadelphia. The former Carmela Amoroso and her husband of 62 years, John D. Strolli, operated Strolli's restaurant from 1947 until they retired 11 years ago and turned the business at 1528 Dickinson St. over to a daughter, Filomena Seiple. John Strolli died last November at age 81. The restaurant had a clientele that hailed from all over the United States and abroad.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1987 | By Gerald Etter, Inquirer Food Writer
About this time of year, when all appears to have reached its bleakest, you begin looking for signs of new life. Such as a crocus cracking through the earth. Or a new restaurant. Bright, sunny and cheerful, filled with a spring-like promise of bounty. And guess what? I think I found one. It's called Alfio's. It's in Glenside, and it's only a month or so old. The place is named for Alfio Gaglianese, probably no stranger to many of the area's restaurant-goers. He was for nearly two decades the gracious and suave maitre d' of the DaVinci restaurant.
NEWS
May 9, 2005 | By Toni Callas and Tom Infield INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Patrons of Downey's restaurant, a well-known Irish pub at Front and South Streets in Philadelphia, were enjoying a Mother's Day brunch at 11:35 yesterday morning when shots rang out from an apartment above the dining room. Police said that Marco Centofanti, 33, shot and wounded his mother, Adele Centofanti, 60. He then fatally shot himself with a 9mm pistol. It was an attempted murder-suicide, police said. The mother was listed in guarded but stable condition last night at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
More code violations were uncovered Wednesday at an acclaimed Chinese restaurant on the Main Line that was shut down Tuesday after it failed to correct problems first cited three weeks ago. Radnor Township officials said they had tried to work with the management at Yangming to ensure that the popular eatery was up to code after violations were uncovered during a routine inspection in July. But they shut the place down after customers complained and violations were still not addressed.
NEWS
May 7, 1987 | By Laurie T. Conrad, Special to The Inquirer
A man wearing a black ski mask and wielding a double-barreled shotgun robbed the Popeyes Famous Fried Chicken & Biscuits restaurant on Bethlehem Pike of more than $2,000 shortly before the restaurant closed Sunday, Springfield Township police said. The restaurant's manager was treated at Chestnut Hill Hospital for a head injury suffered when the assailant struck him with the gun, police said. They declined to release the manager's name. There were four employees in the restaurant when the gunman entered shortly before 11:30 p.m. with the shotgun concealed in a green trash bag, police said.
NEWS
July 10, 1986 | By PAUL MARYNIAK, Daily News Staff Writer
At the Hobo Pancake Kitchen, a rat recently jumped on a patron's lap. The basement of the Reading Terminal Market is infested with rats and mice. Pools of stagnant water and sewage teem with insect eggs, representing a potential health problem for the 60-odd food stalls located on the market level above. An alleged series of health code violations ranging from fly infestations to defective and dirty kitchen equipment has made H.A. Winston's Restaurant at 1500 Locust St. the target of six legal actions by the city as a result of 12 inspections in the past 14 months.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Michael Klein, Philly.com
Georges Perrier - shaking off notions of a post-Le Bec-Fin dotage - is coming to the aid of one of his former employees, a restaurateur who is recovering from a nightmarish situation: the jailing of a business partner accused of the sexual abuse of a child . Perrier is now chef-adviser at Crow & the Pitcher , on 19th Street just south of Rittenhouse Square. Michael Franco, who worked for Perrier as a sommelier and general manager for six years, opened the bar-restaurant last year with chef Alex Capasso and an investor.
NEWS
March 14, 1997 | CHRIS GARLINGTON/ FOR THE DAILY NEWS
Firemen hose down S.C. Toland's Restaurant, at Ridge Pike and Main Street, in Plymouth Township, which burned to the ground yesterday. Faulty wiring is suspected.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | By Kurt Pfitzer, Special to The Inquirer
The Warminster Township Planning Commission has recommended that Cucci's Ristorante obtain a variance from the township parking-space requirements before it begins construction to double its seating space. In a unanimous vote Wednesday, the commission recommended that the Board of Supervisors reject a plan to build an 80-seat, 15-by-55-foot addition to the restaurant at 41 N. York Rd. John Shihadeh, a Warrington contractor retained by Cucci's to build the addition, said the restaurant now has 80 seats.
NEWS
June 10, 1987 | By Rich Heidorn Jr., Inquirer Staff Writer
From the Limoges porcelain and brass candlesticks to the $42.95 filet de boeuf Chasseur, nothing is cheap about Chez Robert restaurant in Westmont - except the owner, says the U.S. Department of Labor. In a lawsuit filed yesterday in federal court in Camden, the department accused the exclusive restaurant of violating the Fair Labor Standards Act by not paying its employees the minimum wage, failing to pay overtime and failing to keep records detailing employees' hours. The complaint listed the names of dozens of employees the department said had been cheated since at least June 1, 1984.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 30, 2016 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The property and liquor license for the defunct Coastline Bar & Grill, a popular Cherry Hill landmark, is expected to change hands soon after a federal bankruptcy judge approved the sales. According to court records, Judge Andrew B. Altenburg approved the sale of the liquor license for more than $1 million to the Village at Woodcrest, the company that owns and operates the Woodcrest Country Club and golf course, also in Cherry Hill. Altenburg approved the sale of Coastline's property at 1240 Brace Rd. for more than $2.5 million to Orens Development Inc., which builds senior living facilities.
FOOD
January 29, 2016 | Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
When David Chan began keeping his Chinatown restaurant open into the wee hours in 1992, he knew of only a handful of other Center City eateries that did the same. The after-midnight scene was reserved for 24-hour diners, the cheesesteak giants in South Philly, and pizza by the slice. But steadily over the years, Philadelphia has become a late-night city, or at least a later-night one, with an increasing number of restaurants offering food and drink until midnight, and a number cooking until 2 a.m. The change is most clear at the city's core.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Staff Writer
A RESTAURANT owner on West Philadelphia's beleaguered 60th Street commercial strip was beaten and robbed when she tried to open her shop Friday morning. Kum Kim, 54, was confronted shortly after 5:30 a.m. by a man in dark clothing as she tried to lift the security gate at the Uptown Grill, on 60th near Ludlow, according to police. The situation veered from unnerving to violent in a few seconds. The robber demanded that Kim hand over her pocketbook, then punched her in the face and knocked her to the ground.
FOOD
January 22, 2016 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
A family affair When Xu Lin's father died two years ago, the longtime Chinatown community activist decided it was time to spend more time with his siblings. His siblings happened to be restaurateurs in Canada. Lin persuaded his brother Sean, his sister Ping and her husband, Edison Wang, to come to Philadelphia, where last week they opened Bubblefish , a contemporary BYOB in a former shoe store at 909 Arch St. in Chinatown (267-930-7634). The name combines the specialties: bubble tea and brewed teas (including sea salt tea, which has a creamy whipped salt topping)
NEWS
January 17, 2016
By Elizabeth LaBan Lake Union. 316 pp., $14.95 Reviewed by Lari Robling Art imitates life in this first foray into "chick lit" by Elizabeth LaBan, wife of staff restaurant Craig LaBan. Despite the disclaimer that The Restaurant Critic's Wife is fiction, readers familiar with her husband's reviews will undoubtedly be scanning the pages for insight into the man who sets the standard for the area's dining scene. The microphone up the sleeve and the decibel meter we know as facts . . . but Dumpster diving to find the source of a sauce?
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
Joy Tsin Lau, the Chinatown eatery where 100 lawyers and law students were sickened in February, received another scorching helping of criticism last week from the city Health Department. The dim sum restaurant "does not have adequate refrigeration equipment [or the] capacity to maintain all refrigerated foods at a temperature of 41 degrees or below," inspector Thomas Kolb wrote Thursday. Temperatures over 41 degrees promote the rapid growth of potentially toxic bacteria. In his report, Kolb wrote that jellyfish, duck, and bean sprouts were being stored at temperatures of 50 degrees or more at Joy Tsin Lau. The inspector also cited the restaurant for two additional serious risk factors - an employee eating in the kitchen prep area and another who did not follow proper hand-washing protocols - and seven lesser infractions.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Molly Eichel, Staff Writer
Elizabeth LaBan is taking a risk. She's publishing a novel about a subject that's close to home. Or rather, lives in her home. LaBan's husband is Craig LaBan, whose name you certainly recognize if you're reading this publication. Her latest novel is The Restaurant Critic's Wife , about Lila, a hotel crisis manager, and her food-critic husband, who is obsessed with not only his job, but keeping his identity a secret. So how true to life is it? LaBan, who appears at the Free Library on Tuesday, talks about separating fact from fiction and why she can't share pictures of her family on Facebook.
NEWS
January 1, 2016
Ruby Cavanaugh, 93, the woman whose love for 1940s music and culture inspired her son to create a chain of diners in her name, died Sunday in Tustin, Calif. "Ruby was known for her quick smile, warm personality and inner strength," the Ruby's Diner restaurant chain said in a statement Tuesday. "Her friends could count on her for warm support during their own trials and tribulations, and more than anything she put family first. " Ms. Cavanaugh was born in Jefferson City, Mo., and moved with her family to California in 1936.
NEWS
December 28, 2015 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
What follows is a summary of the restaurants reviewed this year, primarily on Sundays, but also in Thursday Food features. As always, there were second chances and revisits to a handful of restaurants to check for improvement. I went back to six places that seemed within striking distance of a rating change - those are designated with an asterisk. Good news there: One stepped up from two to three bells (Aldine), one moved from one to two (Ardé), another climbed out of the no-bells basement (Bonchon)
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