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NEWS
May 4, 1991 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
A police officer and a suspect were shot last night as the officer and his partner broke up an attempted robbery at a City Avenue restaurant, police said. Officer Robert Bannan, 30, was wounded once in the abdomen about 9:40 p.m. inside the El Torito restaurant, adjacent to the Presidential Towers apartments at City Avenue and Presidential Boulevard. Bannan, a cop for six years, was in critical but stable condition today following surgery at the Osteopathic Medical Center of Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 23, 2000
The Mobil Guide has had its say about one of Philadelphia's most famous restaurants. What do you look for when you're dining out? Tell us about an experience that was even better than you expected. Send essays of about 200 words by Feb. 7 to Community Voices/Restaurants, The Inquirer, Box 41705, Philadelphia, Pa. 19101. Send faxes to 215-854-4483 or e-mail to inquirer.letters@phillynews.com Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-4543.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
The Whitemarsh Township Planning Commission has recommended approval by the Zoning Hearing Board of a special exception that would allow a restaurant to operate in a commercial-retail district. The vote Tuesday night was 6-0. Commission member Ruth Buescher abstained. She opposed recommending approval because of parking concerns, but since all parking requirements were met, she said she could not vote against the plan. A special exception is required for eating establishments to operate in a commercial-retail district, township planner Robert Stutzman said.
FOOD
October 5, 1997 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
For many travelers, eating in the hotel restaurant is often a last resort, done mainly when it's impossible to get a reservation at the hot new eatery in town. Michael Bowman accepts that. Which is why, rather than spin his wheels trying to lure hotel guests away from the temptations of Walnut Street and other popular restaurant neighborhoods and into Between Friends, the Wyndham Franklin Plaza's executive chef says that his goal has been to attract repeat local business to the hotel's upscale restaurant.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
Ellyn Karp of Fort Washington couldn't resist. The bright red Horn & Hardart insignia beckoned like a call from beyond. So Karp changed her course along Old York Road and turned into Jenkintown Square so she and her parents, Florence and Harold Goldberg, could have an old-time lunch in the traditional Philadelphia restaurant at a new Jenkintown location. "Horn & Hardart brought back memories," Harold Goldberg said, nodding toward his middle-aged daughter. "She remembered eating lunch there with her Pop-Pop years ago. " Florence Goldberg chimed in that her father - Ellyn's grandfather, Jacob Gallob - kept kosher and would eat only vegetables when he was away from home.
FOOD
February 4, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
My dinner partner, a distinguished older gentleman, looked worried when I announced we'd be reviewing Caffe Bene. His restaurant Italian wasn't great, he said. He wouldn't know what to order. What I read between the lines was that he sniffed a trendy restaurant where he would be forced to eat designer foods created for 29-year-old aerobics instructors. Trust me, I said. And he did, letting me make choices for both of us at the restaurant on South Second Street. The result was an evening that showed him that the trendiest of restaurants sometimes serve generation-bridging food and that I had guessed right in assuming that the restaurant - under Lew Norsworthy's direction - would offer fare similar to the simple but imaginative stuff I'd loved at Spring Garden's Mezzanotte when Norsworthy was there.
FOOD
July 29, 1990 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
With just 24 seats, a number that includes the lineup of stools at the front counter, tiny Tapioca isn't the sort of restaurant you'd expect to see in this column. But it's fun, friendly and worth your attention, so I'm leaving the restaurant open to the risk of the ruinous rush of business that casting the spotlight on a small place often causes. The restaurant named for the old-timey comfort dessert is not a place you'd make a special trip to find. I would be mighty surprised if anyone went there to celebrate an anniversary or birthday.
NEWS
December 22, 1991 | By Donald D. Groff, Special to The Inquirer
The Mexican government has begun a restaurant hygiene program through which major restaurants can retrain employees and, after passing inspection, display an "E" for excellence sign in their windows. The program, outlined by Sigfrido Paz-Paredes, projects director for Mexico's tourism secretariat, is intended to allay health concerns of would-be tourists. Paz-Paredes announced the program at the National Tour Association's convention in Cleveland last month. The official said food-preparation standards were developed by the ministries of health and tourism and then offered to the National Association of Restaurants, whose members can enroll in the program.
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Charles "Uncle Charlie" Collins, who could make bread pudding to melt in a mouth and smile to melt a heart, died yesterday. He was 89 and had lived in South Philadelphia. A lot of people are gone now who used to eat at the Collins' restaurant in the 1930s in the 500 block of South Broad Street. It was near the old Lincoln Theater at Broad and Lombard streets, and Collins' was a favorite spot for the vaudeville patrons and performers. Uncle Charlie later ran two other restaurants, in the 1500 and 1900 blocks of South Street in the 1940s and 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2014 | By Molly Eichel
IS FORMER mob boss Joseph "Skinny Joey" Merlino getting into the restaurant business in Florida? GossipExtra.com, run by Miami Herald contributor/former New York Daily News reporter Jose Lambiet , seems to think so. Lambiet reports that Merlino and investors will open a restaurant "in the heart of Boca Raton," which Merlino has called home since completing his 14-year prison stint for racketeering. Lambiet quotes business broker Daron Tersakyan , who was not familiar with Merlino but confirmed that investors "want to set up a high-end, South Philadelphia-style Italian place.
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