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NEWS
February 26, 2015 | BY JULIE SHAW, Daily News Staff Writer shawj@phillynews.com, 215-854-2592
ON FATHER'S DAY 1992, Santiago Pedroso walked to a table in a crowded Germantown restaurant and fired five times at his wife's best friend, killing her, because he thought they were lovers, a prosecutor said yesterday. "He thought they were having an affair," Assistant District Attorney Richard Sax said. "He thought his wife and Delores Alvarez were lesbians and he was being left behind. " After the shooting at the Hathaway Inn, on Chelten Avenue near Wissahickon, Pedroso, then 50, fled, Sax told a Common Pleas jury in his opening statement at Pedroso's murder trial.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Raymond L. Lex, 86, of Sewell, a former partner in the Chestnut House restaurant in Westville, died of Alzheimer's disease Monday, Feb. 9, at Woodbury Mews, an assisted living community. Mr. Lex grew up near Shibe Park in North Philadelphia, and ended his education at the eighth grade to help support his family. "His parents had a fish market," said daughter Carol. "He stopped going to school because he was the youngest and he was needed in the market. " Mr. Lex's father, Howard, had been a cook in the Army.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Responding to the death of Shane Montgomery - who drowned in the Schuylkill after leaving a Manayunk bar on Thanksgiving morning, but whose fate was a mystery for weeks afterward - Philadelphia City Councilman Curtis Jones Jr. wants to require every business that serves alcohol to install exterior cameras. "I don't want this to ever happen to anybody again," said Karen Montgomery, Shane's mother, who suggested the legislation. "I lost Shane for 36 days. And I looked for him for 36 days.
NEWS
February 6, 2015
FACE FULLY obscured but voice fully audible, Tom Bee rummages around the compartments of Franky Bradley's host stand, leading a one-man search party for something. Suddenly, his hand pops up like a periscope, waving a yellowed magazine half-shrouded in a black plastic bag. "Is this your Playboy ?" His cousin Mark Bee, owner and primary resurrector of this historic Center City space, shoots it a quick glance and nods. "Oh, yeah. There's a couple really good articles in there.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2015
ALL OF THE recent chatter about local restaurant food safety had me thinking that, as bad as the statistics are, it's really far worse than what most people can even imagine. The restaurant industry has an appetite for one thing: profits! Restaurants don't really care about your health or nutrition, let alone food safety. Let's take, for example, the "healthy" grilled vegetable salad with salmon, sold at a local mid-level chain. This healthy-sounding, $20 salad has a whopping 1040 calories, if we can believe their website (content is often underestimated)
FOOD
January 22, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
A resurrected seafood house on the site of Bookbinder's. A pub serving fried bologna and roast beef sandwiches. A 1980s theme restaurant bringing back the surf and turf. A vintage-styled dinette, slinging Western omelets. Suddenly, it seems that the newest local trend in food isn't about the future at all - it's about looking back. Just when you thought it was safe to hock your fondue pot on eBay, here comes all the food you haven't seen on menus for a couple of decades. The good news is that verbs and conjunctions might also return to menus as chefs forgo their molecular aspirations to get back to the basics.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Nearly half of food-borne-illness outbreaks are linked to restaurant food. The microbes that cause them are invisible and taste just fine. So how can you lower your odds of getting sick? "Go look at the bathroom," suggests Ken Gruen, a retired Philadelphia restaurant inspector ("sanitarian") who advises food establishments at Philadelphia International Airport. "If the bathroom is kept in good condition - it's clean, there is soap, there are paper towels, there is not a lot of litter on the floor - probably the kitchen is the same.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | BY DON SAPATKIN, |INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Has your favorite Center City restaurant ever been closed for food-safety violations? Has it been taken to court? Or is it squeaky clean? In Philadelphia, it can be tough to tell. The city does post all inspection findings online, but they're not easy to find, and it can take a detective's zeal to decipher them. No A-B-C letter grades are posted out front, as in Los Angeles and New York. There's no consumer-friendly summary that is mandatory in New Jersey ("satisfactory/conditionally satisfactory")
FOOD
January 9, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to restaurant trend forecasts, there's sometimes a tendency toward the frivolous: Is kale finally wilting? Are doughnuts the new cupcakes? Will this be the year crickets become a mainstream protein? But when chefs and forecasters look to 2015, they see more substantive changes ahead. Those have less to do with what's in fashion than with evolving technology, looming concerns about sustainability, and a pressing need to manage costs as restaurant workers seek higher wages.
NEWS
January 9, 2015
VEGAN restaurants tend to share an origin story: Earnest vegans, cooking food to nourish the heart, soul and planet, share their culinary activism with the public at large. Sometimes it works, sometimes there's more sincerity than cooking aptitude. But in Jenkintown, the new Flora is a novel case: a vegan restaurant started by nonvegans (with a nonvegan chef) on the notion that it's good business. "Yeah, in-between Blue Sage [Vegetarian Grille, in Southampton] and Center City, there weren't a whole lot of vegan dining options," explained Dan Brightcliffe, a co-founder who also doubles as low-key host and waiter for the cozy, 16-seat venue, on Old York Road between Greenwood and West avenues.
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