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NEWS
December 8, 2015 | By John F. Morrison, Daily News Staff Writer
The doctors would look at Vince Iannelli's medical report and then up at him and wonder if they had the right guy. The man in the medical report was riddled with cancers that had invaded his prostate, lungs, liver, and bones. The smiling, happy-go-lucky man before the doctors didn't look as if he'd been sick a day in his life. "He had an inner spirit," his sister Donna Iannelli said. "I would say to the oncologist: 'Look at my brother. I see you don't believe the report.' " Vincent T. Iannelli, 68, who operated a pizzeria and bakery at Ninth and McKean Streets in South Philadelphia called Captain Pepperoni and the High Rollers, died Saturday, Nov. 28. At its height in the late '70s and early '80s, Captain Pepperoni's was possibly the liveliest eatery in South Philly.
FOOD
November 13, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
In the scramble for the newest thing, the personal connection between chefs and diners can sometimes get lost in the shuffle. That's why some Philadelphia-area restaurateurs are taking inspiration from their own lives, both in their decor and cooking and in reconnecting with customers in interesting ways. From its inception, Midtown Village newcomer Bud & Marilyn's was conceived as a throwback to owner Marcie Turney's grandparents' restaurant in Wisconsin. "My grandfather was the cook, and my grandmother ran the front.
NEWS
November 1, 2015
A headline in some editions Friday on a story about the closing of the Osteria restaurant at Moorestown Mall misspelled the name of Catelli Duo, the restaurant that will occupy the space.
FOOD
October 23, 2015
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat of Oct. 20, 2015:   Reader: I read in The Inquirer that health inspections in Philly restaurants are not published until 30 days after the inspection, as opposed to N.Y.C. and other large cities that are posted immediately. How can this be? What can be done to change this? How do you feel about this problem? I don't want to see others get sick from poor health inspection being withheld for 30 days. C.L.: The Inquirer has done a lot of work to present Philly's restaurant health reports for public scrutiny.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Linda Jeffers looked over the spring roll she ordered. "I don't see any bugs," she said drily to two friends as she bit into her appetizer. "Of course, we wouldn't know; they could be crunchy. " And with that joke, the ice was broken, and the three lunch partners seemed delighted to be back at a favorite Main Line haunt, Yangming Restaurant, which opened Wednesday for the first time since it was shut down for health violations two months ago. The three were among about 45 customers who showed up for lunch after the restaurant opened at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday.
NEWS
October 19, 2015 | By Michael Klein and Craig LaBan, Staff Writers
Restaurant pros are suddenly more passionately divided than ever on whether tipping should be a thing of the past. But most locals still plan to wait and see how influential restaurateur Danny Meyer fares with his game-changing new plans to raise prices and do away with gratuities at his 13 New York restaurants. Eli Kulp and Ellen Yin of the High Street Hospitality Group support the movement in theory. "The idea of eliminating tipping has been a very big conversation in our company lately as well," says Kulp.
NEWS
October 14, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cristina Martinez arrives at work at 4 a.m., ties a white apron high across her chest, and starts preparing a lamb cooked in vapor for 10 hours. An hour later, she and her husband, Ben Miller, open their South Philadelphia restaurant, Barbacoa, serving premium tacos - and hefty sides of activism - in their bid to mobilize restaurateurs on behalf of the many undocumented immigrants who work in America's kitchens. Hosting organizational meetings and screening documentaries, the couple hope to spark a culinary crusade in a city famous for its restaurant scene - and pressure the deadlocked Congress to overhaul the immigration laws.
NEWS
October 12, 2015 | By Matthew Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A restaurant that is going out of business usually doesn't get to savor a months-long victory lap. But for D'Ignazio's Towne House in Media, slated to close for good at the end of the year, the long goodbye seems to fit just about right. After all, just about everything about the Towne House - the Baltimore Pike landmark that dates to the Truman administration - is rare. For decades it has hosted politicians, from council members and judges to legislators and a future president.
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president and parent company for 17 Houlihan's restaurants throughout New Jersey and New York have been sued for skimming tips, failing to pay overtime, allowing bartenders to work off the clock, and for overcharging employees for meals eaten in the restaurant, according to a federal lawsuit filed this week. Attorneys representing the A.C.E. Restaurant Group in New York, and its president Arnold Runestad, said the lawsuit is the result of false allegations made by a few disgruntled employees.
NEWS
October 7, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The owners of Brickwall Tavern, a trendy bar and comfort food restaurant in Asbury Park, will open a second location inside a historic firehouse in Burlington City on Thursday. The tavern, which will have 24 beers on tap, will also offer fare such as Cajun-seared shrimp and grits, blackened catfish, and mac & cheese cooked in an cast-iron skillet. Smith, a company based in Asbury Park that buys up old buildings with exposed walls in struggling towns and turns them into restaurants, began purchasing properties in Burlington City two years ago. Brickwall Tavern is the first the company will launch in Burlington, while Porta Pizza, another popular gourmet restaurant in the Shore town, is expected to be next.
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