CollectionsRestructuring
IN THE NEWS

Restructuring

NEWS
May 9, 2012 | Daily News Editorial
Today, the City Council budget hearing for the school district starts at 10 a.m. Given what's at stake and the complexity of the changes the district is proposing, by our reckoning, the hearing should end ... sometime next month. The district recently announced a massive restructuring plan that will close schools, create "achievement networks," push more students into charters, and rely on major concessions from the unions to get $156 million in savings, while coping with a deficit of more than $200 million for next year.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1988 | By Marian Uhlman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennwalt Corp. yesterday laid off 61 Philadelphia-area employees as part of its efforts to become a smaller and less complex company, a spokeswoman said. The layoffs included 40 workers at corporate headquarters in Philadelphia and 16 others at the company's research center in King of Prussia, said Pennwalt spokeswoman Sue Kinard. She said five employees who staffed the company's two airplanes also lost their jobs. Before the layoffs, Kinard said, 500 people worked at the company's headquarters at Three Parkway in Philadelphia and 305 people were employed at the research and development center.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1989 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
Atlantic Financial Corp., already struggling to come up with a way to increase its capital to meet tougher regulatory requirements, took a fresh blow yesterday when it nearly doubled its reserves for bad loans after an annual examination by the Federal Home Loan Bank Board. Atlantic Financial, a savings and loan association based in Bala Cynwyd, said it was boosting its reserves by $41 million - they had totaled $42.7 million as of June 30 - though the company said it was disputing the need for $19 million of the amount.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | By Vaclav Havel
A dominant feature of Prague is the Gothic tower of the Cathedral of St. Vitus, St. Wenceslas and St. Adalbert. That tower is now wrapped in scaffolding because it is being renovated. Temporarily, the scaffold conceals the tower's beauty. That concealment, however, is designed to preserve this beauty forever. Perhaps this scaffolding serves as an analogy for our world, and particularly that of the post-Communist countries. If some of our best features are not quite visible for the time being, it is because the societies are undergoing change, striving anew - this time in complete freedom - to rediscover and restore our true identities.
BUSINESS
December 7, 1987 | By Janet L. Fix, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three years ago, PSFS, by all accounts, had great potential but plenty of problems. Frederick S. Hammer got $782,133 his first year to come in as president and change things. Today, Hammer is chairman, and PSFS has a corporate parent with big plans and a fancy name, Meritor Financial Group, but its potential and problems remain largely unchanged. From the start, Hammer said that to improve profitability Meritor simply needed time to expand and rid itself of its "historic baggage.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1988 | The Inquirer Staff
Eastern Airlines said yesterday that a widely publicized investigation into its safety would continue to have an effect on its earnings, which have already been hit by safety worries and passenger complaints. Eastern, part of Texas Air Corp. of Houston, lost $90 million in the second quarter, compared with a profit of $27 million in the same period last year. The Miami-based airline has said it would lay off up to 4,000 workers to save money. The statement came in a filing to the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1996 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Limbo limbo like Al Dunlap. How lo-o-o-o-o-w can he go? At Scott Paper Co., he cut one-third of the workforce. Now, at Sunbeam Corp., he is cutting half. "Next time it will be 70 percent. Then he'll get a company and just close it down to please the shareholders," said Michael Useem, a professor of management at the Wharton School. "It would be funny," he said, "if it didn't hurt so much. " Dunlap's latest corporate downsizing once again raises the question of shareholder rights versus the rights of workers and other corporate stakeholders.
BUSINESS
June 23, 2000 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Genesis Health Ventures Inc., of Kennett Square, filed for Chapter 11 protection yesterday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware, citing $1.5 billion in debts. Genesis is the fifth major nursing home company to file for bankruptcy in the last year as the industry has been battered by reimbursement reductions by Medicare. Genesis officials said that the company's 311 facilities in 15 states would continue to operate through Chapter 11 restructuring. "Chapter 11 protection ensures that employees can focus their attention on serving our customers while we restructure," Genesis's chairman and chief executive officer, Michael R. Walker, said.
NEWS
March 1, 2003 | By Charles Krauthammer
America goes courting Guinea, Cameroon and Angola in search of the nine Security Council votes necessary to pass our new resolution on Iraq. The absurdity of the exercise mirrors the absurdity of the United Nations itself. Guinea is a perfectly nice place and Guineans perfectly nice people. But from the dawn of history to the invention of the United Nations, it made not an ounce of difference what a small, powerless, peripheral country thought about a conflict thousands of miles away.
NEWS
February 24, 2009 | By Harold Brubaker and Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writers
Beginning today in federal court, a bankruptcy judge will commence hearings that in the coming months will determine the future of the parent company of The Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, and Philly.com. Among the complex issues awaiting U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Jean K. FitzSimon are how much the company - Philadelphia Newspapers L.L.C. - is worth, how much debt it can support, and who will end up owning the business. While the proceedings, which could easily last more than a year, are under way, the two newspapers will continue to publish, readers will receive their newspapers as usual, and the Web audience for Philly.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
|
|
|
|
|