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Resuscitation

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NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
You might recall the name of Michelle Funk, the toddler who was submerged underwater in an icy creek in 1986 for more than an hour. When paramedics finally pulled her out, she was lifeless, cold and blue. Miraculously, as the American Medical Association later described it, the 21/2-year-old not only survived, she made a full recovery. No one had ever been "dead" for that long and brought back without severe brain damage. Funk's recovery is an extraordinary case of resuscitation, the act of bringing patients back to life.
SPORTS
December 22, 1997 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
At one moment yesterday, a sellout crowd of 77,000 at the Silverdome was screaming its lungs out, cheering on the Detroit Lions to a playoff berth and Barry Sanders to a milestone. The next moment, there was dead silence. Detroit's Reggie Brown, a second-year linebacker from Texas A&M, was knocked unconscious in a chilling collision during the fourth quarter of the Lions' 13-10 victory over the New York Jets and suffered a bruised spine. Brown, 23, needed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation after trainers and doctors rushed out to attend to him, and he left the field in an ambulance.
NEWS
March 28, 1999 | By Jon Stenzler, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The body of the boy seemed stuck to the shattered windshield of the purple Dodge Neon as it sped along Cuthbert Boulevard that day last June. Seventh grader Andrea Sammut had watched in horror as her classmate, Brian Place, was struck by the car and thrown 20 feet. The two had been walking home from school with Greg White and Jason Klevenz. Klevenz was walking his bicycle. Sammut was four feet behind Place when he tried to cross Cuthbert at Merrick Avenue and was hit. He was propelled over the Neon and landed on his back and head, knocking him unconscious.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Sandra Stevens, Special to The Inquirer
Quick thinking and emergency training by a convenience store employee may have saved the life of a Toms River man Monday, a rescue squad member said. Debra Good, 33, manager of the Wawa store in the Country Lakes Shopping Center, Browns Mills, administered cardiopulmonary resuscitation to Louis Drahos, 73, after he went into cardiac arrest in his car outside the store. Good, a former member of the New Egypt First Aid volunteer squad, said a woman came into the Wawa about 8 a.m. asking for help.
NEWS
September 9, 1999 | By Melody McDonald, and Marc Levy, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Authorities were investigating the drowning of a 9-month-old baby who was found face down in the bathtub of a Camden apartment yesterday morning. The Camden County Medical Examiner's Office ruled the death of Jovanny Martinez accidental, but authorities were looking into the circumstances, said Greg Reinert, spokesman for the county Prosecutor's Office. The mother, Latisia Martinez, 19, told police that Jovanny was bathing with his 2-year-old sister when she found him unresponsive in the tub, Reinert said.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr. and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
Doctors on a golf outing in Overbrook yesterday morning dived into the waters of a nearby creek to save a 10-year-old West Philadelphia boy who was drowning. Jerry Mancini, of the 6500 block of Lebanon Avenue, was not breathing and had no pulse, and his skin had turned dark blue, after he fell into the Indian Creek branch of Cobbs Creek. As the boy sank beneath the surface, one of his friends ran screaming across the Karakung Golf Course, where William Keen, 30, a cardiology fellow at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, and two other doctors were ready to tee off on the 14th hole.
NEWS
May 30, 1991 | By Bob Tulini, Special to The Inquirer
Margaret Procopio is alive today thanks to two of Medford Township's finest. On Nov. 1, Procopio, 78, drove from her home in Maple Shade to St. Mary of the Lakes Church in Medford to attend Mass with her daughter. She entered church about 20 minutes early for the 9 a.m. Mass that All Saints Day. "I walked into church and I felt a little funny," Procopio said after a ceremony last week honoring Medford police officers. "I was getting out of breath. I sat down and I collapsed.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | by Yvette Ousley, Daily News Staff Writer
Tyrone Haynes carries his life in a blue duffel bag. He owns only the clothes on his back, the cap on his head and the shoes on his feet. His home is where he lays his head at night. A former painter who said he had fallen on hard times and turned to drinking and drugs, he comes by way of meals when and where he can. Though he is homeless, Haynes has a heart - a heart that led him to save the life of a man who lay pulseless and breathless near 16th and Locust streets two days ago. The man, Thomas Clisby, is now recovering at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, where he was listed in guarded condition in the intensive care unit last evening, hospital officials said.
NEWS
February 6, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
It was just before noon on New Year's Eve when Andy Bilotta, 59, of Havertown, and his wife, Marie, went to Luca's Pizza in the Manoa Shopping Center for lunch. Keith Jackson served a pizza to the couple and was walking away when he heard Marie Bilotta call her husband's name several times. "I didn't know what was happening, but his wife said it was his heart," said Jackson, who is a cashier at the pizza shop. What happened next, Bilotta said, saved his life. "I put my hand to my head, my wife told me, and I was gasping and my eyes started to spin," Bilotta recalled Monday.
NEWS
October 19, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writers
A lifesaving technique is in your hands - literally - when someone's heart stops. The American Heart Association on Monday released updated cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines that call for pressing on the victim's chest and skipping or delaying mouth-to-mouth breaths. The recommendations reflect research showing that "hands-only" CPR is at least as effective in the first few crucial minutes after cardiac arrest as conventional CPR - and unquestionably better than doing nothing.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 3, 2014 | By Evi Heilbrunn, For The Inquirer
You might recall the name of Michelle Funk, the toddler who was submerged underwater in an icy creek in 1986 for more than an hour. When paramedics finally pulled her out, she was lifeless, cold and blue. Miraculously, as the American Medical Association later described it, the 21/2-year-old not only survived, she made a full recovery. No one had ever been "dead" for that long and brought back without severe brain damage. Funk's recovery is an extraordinary case of resuscitation, the act of bringing patients back to life.
SPORTS
October 11, 2013 | By John Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Temple held high hopes for its new passing attack entering coach Matt Rhule's first season, but the Owls offense simply hasn't gotten off the ground. Junior Connor Reilly won the starting quarterback job, and the hope was that he would ignite the Owls in their pro-style, no-huddle offense. Crucial to this success would be the play of junior receiver Jalen Fitzpatrick, an explosive athlete who led Temple last season in receptions (30), receiving yards (363), and yards per catch (12.1)
NEWS
March 18, 2013
Nonmedical med use assailed Prescribing psychotropic medications to normal, healthy children who want to boost their academic performance is not justifiable because it contravenes physicians' responsibility to promote children's authentic development and protect them against coercion by parents or peers, a group of neurologists and bioethicists has asserted. When older adolescents ask for such medications, arguments against the practice are weaker - but it's still inadvisable, they wrote in the journal Neurology.
NEWS
July 30, 2012 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TELEVISION WRITER
Mimi to the rescue! Diva supreme Mariah Carey assumed the daunting task this week of trying to right TV's biggest cruise ship, the SS American Idol , which has been taking on so much water of late that its lifeboats are swinging loose in their cradles. Just what did Fox get for $18 million? That's a matter of speculation. "Mariah is famous primarily for her work in recording studios. Nobody really knows what to expect from her on live TV," says Rolling Stone columnist Rob Sheffield via e-mail.
REAL_ESTATE
July 10, 2011 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Walk by Greg Sclight's house in Northern Liberties, and you probably won't even notice it. Which is exactly what Sclight, 58, intended: "I wanted it real low-key, so people would leave me alone. " But if he opens the front door to show you what he has done to his home, a 100-year-old former garage, take him up on the invitation. Inside, the place is quite the adventure. Sclight - a burly, never-married, multi-professioned, hands-on individual who adopted Philadelphia as his own 11 years ago - has built a New York-style loft out of this 1,200-square-foot space.
NEWS
October 19, 2010 | By Josh Goldstein and Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writers
A lifesaving technique is in your hands - literally - when someone's heart stops. The American Heart Association on Monday released updated cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines that call for pressing on the victim's chest and skipping or delaying mouth-to-mouth breaths. The recommendations reflect research showing that "hands-only" CPR is at least as effective in the first few crucial minutes after cardiac arrest as conventional CPR - and unquestionably better than doing nothing.
NEWS
December 11, 2009
THE REIGNING CLICHE of the health-care debate so far: "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good. " Scratch that. Substitute: "Don't let the good be the enemy of the so-so. " Reports of a health-care compromise in the Senate may be exaggerated. Several of the 10 senators who reportedly made a deal now claim that they merely sent the elements of a possible agreement to the Congressional Budget Office to determine the costs. But in comments to reporters yesterday that were about as subtle as a buzz saw, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signaled that Democratic leaders have all but abandoned the "public option.
NEWS
January 3, 2009 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The prize-winning captain of a Mummers comic brigade was in critical condition yesterday after suffering a heart attack at the end of his New Year's Day performance. Jerry Murray, 57, was dressed as a sequined red devil in a bowler hat when he collapsed in front of the reviewing stand at City Hall. "Everyone thought it was part of the act," said Rich Porco, president of the Murray Comic Club. "He had been dancing like there was no tomorrow, putting his whole effort into that routine.
NEWS
April 1, 2004 | By Arthur L. Caplan and Dominic A. Sisti
Pope John Paul II recently declared that feeding tubes should never be withdrawn from patients imprisoned in a persistent vegetative state. His dictum threatens both to undermine a powerful social consensus about stopping medical care and to compromise the rights and dignity of tens of thousands of patients in American hospitals and nursing homes. The Pope made his remarks on March 20, at a Vatican conference on ethical dilemmas associated with the treatment of incapacitated patients.
NEWS
February 22, 2004 | By Yogesh Rajkotia
Americans now feel that health care should be a higher government priority than terrorism, according to a recent Harris poll. A quick look at recent trends shows us why. Since 2000, health insurance premiums have risen by 40 percent, and 4 million Americans have lost their coverage. The number of uninsured now stands at a staggering 44 million. President Bush and Democratic front-runner Sen. John Kerry (D., Mass.) have proposed dramatically different approaches for our nation's health-care problems.
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