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BUSINESS
April 20, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
After five years as eBay Enterprise, the $1 billion-in-annual-sales, King of Prussia-based, 7,500-worker retail-logistics company founded as GSI Commerce is back as an independent firm with a new name, Radial. "We were the smallest business unit in a big public company. Now, commerce technology and commerce operations is the only thing we do," Radial chief executive Tobias Hartmann said before Tuesday's planned unveiling of the new name at the company's headquarters. Hartmann said that the firm has grown beyond taking clients' customer orders and shipping products from its warehouses in Southern states, Canada, and Europe.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
For most shopping centers, a busy parking lot means busy stores. At Cheltenham Square Mall, on the other hand, the well-trod blacktop masks a big problem within. "There's, like, nothing in there," Kayla Smith-Campbell said Tuesday, glancing across the parking lot where a DSW shoe store closed last month, leaving only a sun-bleached outline of its old marquee. Inside the 1950s-era mall, more than half of the five dozen stores are shuttered. Those that remain sometimes go entire days without seeing a sale, several clerks said.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Columnist
T'was the Sunday before the Sunday before Christmas, and all through the stores, so few consumer-creatures were stirring . . . well, I barely waited for a food-court burrito, hardly broke a sweat for parking, and saw virtually none of the long checkout lines retailers expect and need during the holidays. Uh-oh , I thought to myself. That bad feeling I'd had on Black Friday, after retailers pulled out the stops with Thanksgiving store openings - only to see less-than-killer crowds the next day - had apparently been a sign of more troubling news to come.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Viewing the market one-dimensionally can be fatal for retailers in today's rapidly changing environment. Though retailers don't have a crystal ball to determine the best location for a new store, a new technology at least provides them data - scads of it - to make an informed decision. Dimension - a location analytics platform - was shown by developer CBRE Inc. at a major retail and real estate convention last month in Las Vegas. CBRE wants to have this interactive tool for retailers in all of its U.S. markets by the end of this year.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Since 1980, American retailers have been carrying on a love affair with imported clothing makers and spurning the products of domestic apparel manufacturers. But over the past six months or so, the U.S. garment industry has enjoyed a renewed flirtation with retailers, partly in response to the dollar's falling value overseas and partly because of a new perception by consumers that clothing made in the U.S.A. is better. "There's definitely movement in the direction of domestic clothing makers," said Bob Swift, executive director of Crafted with Pride in the USA Council, the non-profit group that developed the "Made in the USA" campaign.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1996 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Anthony S. Twyman and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Wallace Oversby had a big decision to make - what kind of lingerie to buy his girlfriend for Valentine's Day. A teddy? A bustier? The 23-year-old Embassy Suites guest services clerk was torn. He said he wanted to get her something sexy but not too risque. "You don't want her to think you're some kind of a freak or anything," he explained, as he left Secrets on South, an intimate-apparel store. Thanks to customers like Oversby, who already had purchased a pair of $70 black Reebok athletic shoes for his sweetheart, many retailers yesterday breathed a collective sigh of relief.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this story
To hear some retailers, it won't be the decorations going up, or the carolers singing that will inspire Philadelphians to begin their Christmas shopping. Rather, it's the inevitable end of this year's political campaigns, which have preoccupied customers for months, that may encourage them to get out and spend. "I don't think Bush is going to win, and I think that'll give a real boost to the economy," said Larry Glauser, co-owner of the Sports Favorites apparel store on Cottman Avenue in the Northeast.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Attention Yupscale shoppers: Sharper Image, the executive toy catalog business that also operates 30 retail stores, is racing into Ardmore for an October opening - maybe aboard a pair of its $99 "Frollerskates with Innershoes. " J. Bildner, a hybrid grocery caterer and gourmet operation based in Boston, is renovating a store on Rittenhouse Square, where it will sell things like Ethiopian Harar coffee and goat cheese, side by side with toothpaste and toilet paper. Honeybee, which sells brand-name and designer women's career clothes, is coming to 1711 Walnut St. by early October.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - A last-minute surge in spending saved the holiday shopping season. Major retailers, including Costco, Gap and Nordstrom, on Thursday reported better-than-expected revenue in December. That comes as a relief for stores, which can make up to 40 percent of their annual revenue in the last two months of the year. Americans spent cautiously early in the season as the Northeast recovered from Superstorm Sandy. Then they held back because of fears that the U.S. economy would fall off the "fiscal cliff," triggering massive budget cuts and tax increases that would have amounted to less money in their pockets.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer Staff Writer Mensah M. Dean contributed to this report
They were developers, Realtors and retailers and nearly all of them had one thing in common: But for nine or 10, almost none were registered to vote in Philadelphia. They weren't necessarily campaign contributors, either, and the event was not a fund-raiser. But that doesn't mean that either candidate for mayor could afford to be absent. Nope. If you're going to be mayor in Philadelphia, you need these guys on your team. "They represent important development interests in the city of Philadelphia," said Republican mayoral candidate Sam Katz yesterday after addressing several hundred members of the International Council of Shopping Centers, who were holding their annual regional meeting at the Convention Center.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 17, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Four years ago, a classic yellow school bus gave online eyewear company Warby Parker the confidence to open brick-and-mortar stores. On Friday the bus returned to town enabling Warby to sell eyewear in the park across from the Philadelphia Museum of Art. A half-dozen people had climbed aboard the Warby Parker Class Trip bus at Eakins Oval just before 1 p.m. to try on glasses, with an optician on hand to take measurements and write prescriptions....
BUSINESS
June 30, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
How do you top Jimmy Choo? You don't. Instead, you bring in more heavy hitters to complement the designer-shoe maven. Like eyewear retailer Oliver Peoples, Italian apparel retailer Bottega Veneta, upscale brand Rag & Bone, and luxury Italian furniture retailer Calligaris. They were all announced on Tuesday as tenants that will be moving into King of Prussia's new corridor, which is due to debut Aug. 18. The 155,000-square-foot corridor is to house 50 new retailers, half of which are considered luxury brands, including those named Tuesday by Simon Property Group's mall division president, David Contis.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Amazon as clothes horse: Who would've thought it? The online leviathan is emerging as the nation's top online fashion retailer, according to a new report by 1010data Consumer Purchase Panel, a New York-based analytics platform and data provider. The downward spiral of such department store chains as Macy's and the Gap is largely due to Amazon.com's growing might as an apparel powerhouse, said the report, which backs up an earlier analysis by Morgan Stanley. Amazon fashion sales from January to April of this year were up 70 percent compared with the same period in 2014, while total units sold were up 89 percent, according to the 1010data report, which will be released on 1010data's blog next week.
NEWS
June 19, 2016 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
How should the developer of a luxury apartment complex compensate the city for reneging on an agreement to set aside 25 apartments for low-income Philadelphians? City housing advocates think the only fair solution is for PMC Property Group to pay a penalty to Philadelphia's Housing Trust Fund, to the tune of $5 million, for breaking the agreement, which earned its apartment project a 48-foot height bonus. The developer has other ideas. This week, PMC submitted what is effectively a new zoning application for One Water Street, a 16-story apartment building on the Delaware riverfront, next to the Ben Franklin Bridge.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
To sell more gear, Cabela's simulates the Great Outdoors. Live game fish school in glass-walled aquariums, and stuffed megafauna herd overhead at the retailer's hangar-sized stores on the edge of whitetail-deer country in Hamburg, Pa., or at the heart of tax-free-shopping territory in Newark, Del. So what brings Cabela's to Chester, the shrunken industrial city at the foot of the Commodore Barry Bridge? "Your waterway there, the Delaware River, is super-good for the sport of catfishing," says Darrell Van Vactor , operations manager at Kentucky-based King Kat USA . "It's a great location, central for a lot of people," on a stretch of the Delaware that otherwise has limited public access, Eric Williams , a Cabela's marketing manager, told me. King Kat runs catfish tournaments sponsored and staffed by Cabela's.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Viewing the market one-dimensionally can be fatal for retailers in today's rapidly changing environment. Though retailers don't have a crystal ball to determine the best location for a new store, a new technology at least provides them data - scads of it - to make an informed decision. Dimension - a location analytics platform - was shown by developer CBRE Inc. at a major retail and real estate convention last month in Las Vegas. CBRE wants to have this interactive tool for retailers in all of its U.S. markets by the end of this year.
BUSINESS
May 30, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
LAS VEGAS - Foreigners love shopping in America, especially in this desert burg dubbed Sin City. "There's nothing like it in Mexico," said Jessica Torres, 23, of Puerto Vallarta, who was in the United States on a student visa and was visiting the Las Vegas Strip last week. Likewise, foreign retailers have become increasingly infatuated with the idea of making it big here. It's about supply and demand: Very few new malls are being built in the U.S., but there's plenty of growing demand among international retailers to come here, say mall experts.
NEWS
May 10, 2016
ISSUE | SODA TAX Countering columnist's critique of levy The Kenney administration would like to address several points in Joel Naroff's column about the proposed 3-cents-an-ounce sugary-beverage tax ("Pre-K quandary," May 1): The Department of Revenue looked at 13 studies of the effect of increased price on demand, or elasticity; the range was from -.8 to -1.21, so we decided on the average, -1 (a 1 percent price increase would result in a 1 percent drop in demand). Council members and reporters have been briefed on this methodology.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
Amazon giveth, and Amazon taketh. The giant internet retailer said on April 27 that it will create 2,000 full-time jobs by opening two more fulfillment centers in New Jersey. One will be a 600,000-square-foot facility in Florence, Burlington County, generating 500 new jobs. The other will be an 800,000-square-foot fulfillment center in Carteret, Middlesex County, that will generate about 1,500 jobs. Together, the two facilities will bring Amazon's total physical footprint in the Garden State to 2.5 million square feet of space, if you count three existing centers.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Since opening his own retail eyeglass business in 2002, Cliff Balter has known a number of indignities, including a recession that forced him to close a second store six months after opening it and two failed e-commerce efforts. Perhaps the most obnoxious affront rolled up outside his shop just off Rittenhouse Square on back-to-back Saturdays in November 2012. It was a mobile showroom for Warby Parker, a company launched online in 2010 by four students from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
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