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BUSINESS
December 24, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Columnist
T'was the Sunday before the Sunday before Christmas, and all through the stores, so few consumer-creatures were stirring . . . well, I barely waited for a food-court burrito, hardly broke a sweat for parking, and saw virtually none of the long checkout lines retailers expect and need during the holidays. Uh-oh , I thought to myself. That bad feeling I'd had on Black Friday, after retailers pulled out the stops with Thanksgiving store openings - only to see less-than-killer crowds the next day - had apparently been a sign of more troubling news to come.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Since 1980, American retailers have been carrying on a love affair with imported clothing makers and spurning the products of domestic apparel manufacturers. But over the past six months or so, the U.S. garment industry has enjoyed a renewed flirtation with retailers, partly in response to the dollar's falling value overseas and partly because of a new perception by consumers that clothing made in the U.S.A. is better. "There's definitely movement in the direction of domestic clothing makers," said Bob Swift, executive director of Crafted with Pride in the USA Council, the non-profit group that developed the "Made in the USA" campaign.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1996 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Anthony S. Twyman and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Wallace Oversby had a big decision to make - what kind of lingerie to buy his girlfriend for Valentine's Day. A teddy? A bustier? The 23-year-old Embassy Suites guest services clerk was torn. He said he wanted to get her something sexy but not too risque. "You don't want her to think you're some kind of a freak or anything," he explained, as he left Secrets on South, an intimate-apparel store. Thanks to customers like Oversby, who already had purchased a pair of $70 black Reebok athletic shoes for his sweetheart, many retailers yesterday breathed a collective sigh of relief.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this story
To hear some retailers, it won't be the decorations going up, or the carolers singing that will inspire Philadelphians to begin their Christmas shopping. Rather, it's the inevitable end of this year's political campaigns, which have preoccupied customers for months, that may encourage them to get out and spend. "I don't think Bush is going to win, and I think that'll give a real boost to the economy," said Larry Glauser, co-owner of the Sports Favorites apparel store on Cottman Avenue in the Northeast.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Attention Yupscale shoppers: Sharper Image, the executive toy catalog business that also operates 30 retail stores, is racing into Ardmore for an October opening - maybe aboard a pair of its $99 "Frollerskates with Innershoes. " J. Bildner, a hybrid grocery caterer and gourmet operation based in Boston, is renovating a store on Rittenhouse Square, where it will sell things like Ethiopian Harar coffee and goat cheese, side by side with toothpaste and toilet paper. Honeybee, which sells brand-name and designer women's career clothes, is coming to 1711 Walnut St. by early October.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - A last-minute surge in spending saved the holiday shopping season. Major retailers, including Costco, Gap and Nordstrom, on Thursday reported better-than-expected revenue in December. That comes as a relief for stores, which can make up to 40 percent of their annual revenue in the last two months of the year. Americans spent cautiously early in the season as the Northeast recovered from Superstorm Sandy. Then they held back because of fears that the U.S. economy would fall off the "fiscal cliff," triggering massive budget cuts and tax increases that would have amounted to less money in their pockets.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer Staff Writer Mensah M. Dean contributed to this report
They were developers, Realtors and retailers and nearly all of them had one thing in common: But for nine or 10, almost none were registered to vote in Philadelphia. They weren't necessarily campaign contributors, either, and the event was not a fund-raiser. But that doesn't mean that either candidate for mayor could afford to be absent. Nope. If you're going to be mayor in Philadelphia, you need these guys on your team. "They represent important development interests in the city of Philadelphia," said Republican mayoral candidate Sam Katz yesterday after addressing several hundred members of the International Council of Shopping Centers, who were holding their annual regional meeting at the Convention Center.
NEWS
January 19, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Nyeemah Davis pulled away from her mother's hand, bounded through Cherry Hill Mall's newest children's clothing store, 77kids, and marched up to the electronic kiosk. Nyeemah, only 4 years old and dressed in a hooded, navy blue 77kids sweat suit, punched the oversize buttons on what looked like a giant iPod touch and snapped a digital self-portrait. Then she wandered over to the leopard-print hoodies. "Oh my God, Ny absolutely loves this store," said Laverne Davis, 28, of Clementon, who shops at the store's slightly grown-up predecessor, American Eagle.
BUSINESS
June 8, 2013 | By Mae Anderson, Associated Press
NEW YORK - In the latest sign Americans are feeling better about the economy, stores across the country had a pickup in sales in May. An improving job picture, a better housing market, and stock market rallies have led to consumer confidence's reaching five-year highs. That has left Americans a bit more likely to reach into their pockets, as monthly revenue reports from national retailers showed Thursday. Revenue at stores open at least a year - an industry measure of a retail chain's health - rose 3.2 percent in May compared with May 2012, according to a preliminary tally of 13 retailers by the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC)
BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The nation's major merchants turned in solid sales performances in February, they reported yesterday. Industry analysts said the retailers were helped in large part by women's strong responses to new spring fashions. Jeffrey Feiner, a retail analyst at Merrill Lynch & Co., said the results "were slightly ahead of expectations and reflected the continued improvement that was evident during the Christmas and January selling seasons. " The retailers' sales in stores open for more than a year rose an average of 7 percent to 8 percent in February over the same month a year ago, while total sales were up about 16 percent on average, the analysts said.
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BUSINESS
December 9, 2014 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
When does this stock market rally end? Rick Pitcairn, chief investment officer of Pitcairn, based in Jenkintown, gets that question a lot these days from clients. "I get the sense of trepidation from both institutional and retail investors surrounding the market. They're asking: 'These valuations are extended, and this feels like 1999 - tell me, when's that type of sell-off going to happen?' "In terms of U.S. equities, it's been a stunning rally in magnitude and duration," he says.
NEWS
December 1, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley and Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writers
For the last few years, Day Two of the holiday shopping season - or is it Day Three now? - has been dubbed Small Business Saturday, a day to spotlight independent entrepreneurs and encourage visits to stores not on the mall map. If the holiday traffic at three of the region's shopping destinations was any indication, the strategy might have been working. By noon Saturday, Chestnut Hill's two-lane shopping district along Germantown Avenue had begun filling up with cars. Shop owners sounded cautiously optimistic and said some customers were trying to patronize local businesses and avoid the malls.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shoppers in the Philadelphia region are geared up to increase spending on gifts during the holiday season, according to Deloitte L.L.P.'s 29th annual holiday shopping survey. "The consumer is coming into the holidays pretty confident, and feeling a lot better about the economy and themselves," said Bill Park, a partner in Deloitte's Philadelphia office. Philadelphia-area consumers are expected to spend an average of $609 on gifts this year, up 18 percent from $518 last year, the online survey of 500 consumers found.
NEWS
November 25, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Stroll Moorestown Mall between the food court and Boscov's department store, and that new clothing store, Erdon, might not catch your eye. Its walls are off-white. Some dresses hang from pipe racks. A few black boots and shoes line the shelves. Just another mall store for teenagers, right? Hardly. Go ahead. Step through Erdon's black-framed glass doors and pluck at a sleeve. This black leather jacket by Ivan Grundahl is $1,228. That black cocktail dress is $690. The tailored denim jeans, by Closed, start at $190.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2014 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Gaming the Black Friday hype this week is a priority for many shoppers. A lot of holiday sales have already come and gone, but bargains will abound well into January, the experts say. At Racked.com , a shopping and style site, a post by Erika Adams says there's plenty of evidence of better deals later in the holiday season and into January, but "the prevailing idea that Black Friday is the mother of all sale holidays continues to stick with...
BUSINESS
November 18, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
If any company should be comfortable in the cutthroat business of American retail these days, it should be QVC , the West Chester-based instant-shopping outfit. Store chains such as Urban Outfitters are scrambling to reach buyers through smartphone apps, wired warehouses, and data-guided custom offers in social media. Even Walmart is cutting way back on building new stores. Online-sales giant Amazon.com , for all its rapid growth, is barely profitable. QVC has no chain stores, just its high-ceilinged studio/headquarters at the former Commodore Computer complex, a Lancaster County warehouse, and similar centers in Britain, Italy, Germany, Japan, China, and, soon, France.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Corbett on Tuesday formally opened Philadelphia's first retail compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling site at a BP station on Fox Street in East Falls. The CNG pump is the first outlet for VNG.co, a Bala Cynwyd start-up that aims to build out a national network of natural-gas fueling stations. VNG was founded by Harvey Lamm, former chairman and chief executive of Subaru of America, and Bob Annunziata, founder of Teleport Communications Group. VNG and its partners Aqua Pennsylvania, Comcast and HB Electric Services last year received a $235,000 state grant to purchase 32 CNG vehicles.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
The news is bad. Bad for the weary, end-of-day Chestnut Hill West commuters who get off the train at Evergreen Avenue and stop by this fanciful place - not necessarily to buy something, but to be someplace fun. Bad for the legions of frazzled parents of birthday-party invitees who have counted on it for a last-minute present and free gift wrap on a Saturday morning. And bad for the guy who drove the hour-and-a-half to it from Jim Thorpe just to buy six pimple balls. O'Doodles toy store, a fixture on Germantown Avenue in Chestnut Hill since 1997, is the bearer of the bad news: It is closing.
BUSINESS
August 12, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rick Forman wanted to pay attention in class at Rutgers University, but he just couldn't handle it. "I was crawling out of my skin," said Forman. "I'm like, 'I have to get out of here,' because I'm in the back figuring out how many thousands of dozens of T-shirts I needed to buy for the flea market. " Forman, 54, who started selling T-shirts at flea markets while he was still in high school, never graduated from college. But he did graduate from flea markets to run Forman Mills, a $275 million retail chain with 2,700 employees, 31 stores painted an aggressive yellow, and a loudmouth ad campaign: Stretch those bills at Forman Mills.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
CONGRESS could soon face an unpleasant task if it wants to extend a law that bans state and local governments from taxing residents to browse the Web. The current law, last renewed in 2007, expires Nov. 1, days before midterm elections. If the law isn't renewed, broadband users would see connection fees similar to those appearing on monthly cellphone bills. So what's Congress doing about all this? The House passed a bill July 15 to permanently ban any Internet-access taxes. But when the bill got to the Senate, things soon got very interesting.
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