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BUSINESS
December 24, 2012 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Columnist
T'was the Sunday before the Sunday before Christmas, and all through the stores, so few consumer-creatures were stirring . . . well, I barely waited for a food-court burrito, hardly broke a sweat for parking, and saw virtually none of the long checkout lines retailers expect and need during the holidays. Uh-oh , I thought to myself. That bad feeling I'd had on Black Friday, after retailers pulled out the stops with Thanksgiving store openings - only to see less-than-killer crowds the next day - had apparently been a sign of more troubling news to come.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2016
It can't all be Micky D's and those recognizable golden arches in the inner city. An unobtrusive but consequential bill, called the Healthy Small Food Retailer Act, is weaving its way through the New Jersey Legislature. The measure would assist small food retailers in low- and moderate-income urban and rural communities by providing them funds to increase the availability and sale of fresh and nutritious foods. It passed the state Assembly last week by a 49-18 vote. Both houses are expected to take it up again in the new legislative year.
BUSINESS
January 14, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Since 1980, American retailers have been carrying on a love affair with imported clothing makers and spurning the products of domestic apparel manufacturers. But over the past six months or so, the U.S. garment industry has enjoyed a renewed flirtation with retailers, partly in response to the dollar's falling value overseas and partly because of a new perception by consumers that clothing made in the U.S.A. is better. "There's definitely movement in the direction of domestic clothing makers," said Bob Swift, executive director of Crafted with Pride in the USA Council, the non-profit group that developed the "Made in the USA" campaign.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1996 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Anthony S. Twyman and Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Wallace Oversby had a big decision to make - what kind of lingerie to buy his girlfriend for Valentine's Day. A teddy? A bustier? The 23-year-old Embassy Suites guest services clerk was torn. He said he wanted to get her something sexy but not too risque. "You don't want her to think you're some kind of a freak or anything," he explained, as he left Secrets on South, an intimate-apparel store. Thanks to customers like Oversby, who already had purchased a pair of $70 black Reebok athletic shoes for his sweetheart, many retailers yesterday breathed a collective sigh of relief.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1992 | by Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this story
To hear some retailers, it won't be the decorations going up, or the carolers singing that will inspire Philadelphians to begin their Christmas shopping. Rather, it's the inevitable end of this year's political campaigns, which have preoccupied customers for months, that may encourage them to get out and spend. "I don't think Bush is going to win, and I think that'll give a real boost to the economy," said Larry Glauser, co-owner of the Sports Favorites apparel store on Cottman Avenue in the Northeast.
BUSINESS
August 6, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Attention Yupscale shoppers: Sharper Image, the executive toy catalog business that also operates 30 retail stores, is racing into Ardmore for an October opening - maybe aboard a pair of its $99 "Frollerskates with Innershoes. " J. Bildner, a hybrid grocery caterer and gourmet operation based in Boston, is renovating a store on Rittenhouse Square, where it will sell things like Ethiopian Harar coffee and goat cheese, side by side with toothpaste and toilet paper. Honeybee, which sells brand-name and designer women's career clothes, is coming to 1711 Walnut St. by early October.
NEWS
January 4, 2013 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK - A last-minute surge in spending saved the holiday shopping season. Major retailers, including Costco, Gap and Nordstrom, on Thursday reported better-than-expected revenue in December. That comes as a relief for stores, which can make up to 40 percent of their annual revenue in the last two months of the year. Americans spent cautiously early in the season as the Northeast recovered from Superstorm Sandy. Then they held back because of fears that the U.S. economy would fall off the "fiscal cliff," triggering massive budget cuts and tax increases that would have amounted to less money in their pockets.
NEWS
September 24, 1999 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer Staff Writer Mensah M. Dean contributed to this report
They were developers, Realtors and retailers and nearly all of them had one thing in common: But for nine or 10, almost none were registered to vote in Philadelphia. They weren't necessarily campaign contributors, either, and the event was not a fund-raiser. But that doesn't mean that either candidate for mayor could afford to be absent. Nope. If you're going to be mayor in Philadelphia, you need these guys on your team. "They represent important development interests in the city of Philadelphia," said Republican mayoral candidate Sam Katz yesterday after addressing several hundred members of the International Council of Shopping Centers, who were holding their annual regional meeting at the Convention Center.
NEWS
January 19, 2011 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
Nyeemah Davis pulled away from her mother's hand, bounded through Cherry Hill Mall's newest children's clothing store, 77kids, and marched up to the electronic kiosk. Nyeemah, only 4 years old and dressed in a hooded, navy blue 77kids sweat suit, punched the oversize buttons on what looked like a giant iPod touch and snapped a digital self-portrait. Then she wandered over to the leopard-print hoodies. "Oh my God, Ny absolutely loves this store," said Laverne Davis, 28, of Clementon, who shops at the store's slightly grown-up predecessor, American Eagle.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The new two-story Five Below store on 1529 Chestnut St. marks a milestone for the fastest-growing discount teen retailer in the nation. Its arrival on Chestnut Street - in the old Arcadia Theatre - also continues the corridor's hot streak as a magnet for national retailers, a drastic change from just two years ago. "This is our baby, for sure," said Five Below CEO Joel Anderson, as he took a sweeping glance of the store known for its shock of...
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NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
An out-of-town buyer is under agreement to purchase the former Nabisco plant in Northeast Philadelphia, with plans to redevelop most of the site for retail, said Colliers International senior vice president Richard Gorodesky, who is helping broker the transaction. The unidentified buyer is currently completing due diligence on the deal to buy the 27.5 acre property at 12000 Roosevelt Blvd. where the defunct cookie factory is located, Gorodesky said Friday. Current plans call for demolishing the factory and building shops in its place, he said.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2016
Loyalty pays off. Airlines reward it. So do casinos. Now more than ever, so do department stores, such as Macy's and Target, which are tripping over themselves to make you feel special and wanted. The effort can be summed up in two words: Data analytics. They know you . Bob and Lori McKaig, both 62, of Northeast Philadelphia, are longtime Macy's shoppers. Lori McKaig has had a Macy's credit card for years. The couple joined the cross-brand loyalty program, called Plenti, last year after it was launched by American Express.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2016
It can't all be Micky D's and those recognizable golden arches in the inner city. An unobtrusive but consequential bill, called the Healthy Small Food Retailer Act, is weaving its way through the New Jersey Legislature. The measure would assist small food retailers in low- and moderate-income urban and rural communities by providing them funds to increase the availability and sale of fresh and nutritious foods. It passed the state Assembly last week by a 49-18 vote. Both houses are expected to take it up again in the new legislative year.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2016 | By Suzette Parmley, Staff Writer
For coat retailers, it's worse than a winter of discontent. It's one of deep discounts. The unseasonably warm weather and zero snow have left piles of unsold winter merchandise on stores' floors. While no one has tracked the overall losses, retail analysts say it's easily in the hundreds of millions of dollars for the year's last quarter, causing havoc at stores from Macy's to Burlington Coat Factory. All that red ink is a boon for consumers, though. This month, several retailers resorted to deep discounting of coats, which typically doesn't occur until February or March.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2015
INTERCOURSE, Pa. - With the explosion of online shopping, few can deny the power of the Internet. Not even the Amish and Mennonites, known for being devout to their faith and for shunning technology, electricity, and modern advances that run counter to those beliefs. It raises an intriguing question: Can the Amish and online co-exist? "It is interesting that commerce is forcing even the Amish to adapt to the online retail world," said Barbara Khan, director of the Jay H. Baker Retailing Center at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
BUSINESS
December 18, 2015
900 E-commerce retailers that have signed up for the free-shipping event. $1.35B Estimated amount that online shoppers will spend during the event. 2008 Year that Luke Knowles started the event.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
The east side of Market Street has been getting all the buzz lately, with new residential buildings, a sophisticated mixed-used development at 12th Street, and the renovation of the tired Gallery shopping mall . But the stretch of Market west of City Hall is changing too, just more quietly. West Market is, hands down, Philadelphia's most boring street, a parade of undistinguished office towers where virtually every corner retail space is colonized by a bank branch - as though people still flooded the teller lines to make deposits and withdrawals.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe McGrath is senior vice president of the home store division for Reading-based Boscov's. He is charged with buying anything for the home to stock all 44 Boscov's stores regionally. He said about 25 percent of the products he orders come from China, where "the quality and workmanship has improved. " Retailers, vendors, and merchants are taking note of what appears to be a thawing of relations between China and Taiwan. Some say the meeting between the leaders of both this month - viewed by some as d├ętente, though it's too early to call it that - could mean better economic ties between the two and steady prices on products, such as clothes and electronics, that are made in both.
NEWS
November 28, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than 130 million Americans are expected to shop this Black Friday - a frenzied event that has become as much a part of our Thanksgiving culture as turkey and stuffing. The big difference is that Black Friday is no longer just one day, but a drawn-out sale that starts earlier and lasts longer, and is considered a Hail Mary for retailers to break even for the year. Experts say consumers can expect earlier sales and promotions, deeper discounts, and more online clicks this year compared with last year's five-day, shop-till-you-drop weekend that started on Thanksgiving and ended on Cyber Monday.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
In October, Gloucester Township police arrested a man for stealing cigarettes and a phone charger, which the man planned to sell to get cash for heroin, police said. The man, 31, had a long criminal history: Seven prior arrests for theft, as well as drug-related and domestic violence arrests, police said. But instead of just charging the man last month, a detective told him about addiction treatment resources. After initially disregarding them, the man took up the offer to review the options.
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