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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Coopersmith, 88, of Glen Mills and Jupiter, Fla., a retired executive, civic leader, and sportsman, died of cancer Saturday, Feb. 7, at Taylor Hospice Residence in Ridley Park. A Philadelphia native, he graduated from Villanova College in 1950 and spent a year studying at Georgetown Law School. The world of commerce beckoned, though, so he joined his father, becoming general manager of Great Leopard Super Markets. He operated one of the nation's first supermarkets in the refitted shell of a textile mill in Chester.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Lawrence Dixon, 86, of East Mount Airy, a retired Philadelphia police detective, died Thursday, Feb. 5, of complications from pulmonary disease at Fairview Care Center Bethlehem Pike in Chestnut Hill. Born and reared in West Philadelphia, he graduated from Overbrook High School in 1945. He enlisted in the Navy in 1945 and served in the Seventh Fleet aboard the Merrimack, a fleet oil tanker. Following his military service, Mr. Dixon was employed at the former Frankford Arsenal as an optical etcher, engraving glass used in Army telescopes and binoculars.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charlie Vogel is a familiar face - a celebrity of sorts - in the Hershey's Mill retirement community in East Goshen, Chester County. In a dozen years or so, he has done more than 100 interviews for the community's Channel 20 TV station, which reaches 1,700 homes. Among his most memorable guests were former Phillies manager Charlie Manuel, Phillies second baseman Chase Utley, Phillies' Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn, and TV weather forecasters Herb Clarke and Cecily Tynan. Vogel also interviewed Bill Campbell, the famed Philadelphia sports broadcaster who called Wilt Chamberlain's 100-point game in 1962.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddie Campbell's four tours of duty as a Marine in Korea and Vietnam helped prepare him for the battles that confronted him in Willingboro nearly 30 years later. But there were still a few ambushes. Campbell became a councilman in the predominantly black suburb in 1998 and had to tackle the fallout from white flight, shrinking tax revenue, and spiraling foreclosures. He was first appointed to the governing body after his wife, Doreatha, died of cancer while serving as mayor of their adopted hometown.
TRAVEL
January 26, 2015 | By Frank Hollick, For The Inquirer
"Let's head back to Montana next summer," said my fly-fishing buddy Tom. We had spent a week the previous summer on the beautiful Madison River, and in nearby Yellowstone Park in Wyoming, with our good friend Jim. While not catching a ton of fish, we had a fly fisherman's dream week. "I'm in. Let me talk to Jim," I responded, with visions of 20-inch trout rising to my dry fly filling my head. Jim said yes immediately, and to make the idea more palatable on the home front, we decided to ask our wives to go along.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
From a curved corner property on Passyunk Avenue, his windows packed with merchandise and signs promising to make men look better "if you let us," Abe Mandel has sized up a great many people over the years. Usually, it's to get them into the best-fitting slacks or most flattering shirts. Lately, his focus has been on three men in particular, to determine whether they are the right fit to succeed him at the helm of A Man's Image. He has decided they are. Mandel, 74, proprietor of menswear establishments in the same block of Passyunk (near 12th and Morris Streets)
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be Saturday, Jan. 17, for Loretta Yvonne Mason, 66, a retired Philadelphia School District teacher, who died last month in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., from complications related to her lifelong battle with sickle-cell disease. A North Philadelphia native, Mrs. Mason had moved to Fort Lauderdale in 2004 after she retired. The daughter of Junius and Marie Hicks, Mrs. Mason helped establish a scholarship fund with her brothers to honor their mother for the role she played as plaintiff in a lawsuit that led to the integration of Girard College, following a 1968 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOE O'DOWD, a crack Daily News police reporter, was relaxing at his rental house in Brigantine, N.J., in the summer of 1987 when there came a heavy knock on the door. It was a Brigantine cop with a message from Joe's office telling him to get back to Philly to cover a development in the notorious Gary Heidnik murder case. Apparently, the office didn't have a number for Joe's summer place, so it had to track him through the local cops. Of course, Joe hightailed it back to Philly to check out the case of the man who kidnapped, tortured and raped six women he held prisoner in his North Philadelphia "House of Horrors," killing two. Joseph Donald O'Dowd, considered one of the best of a legendary contingent of reporters who covered the cops for the Daily News, the Inquirer and the Bulletin in the days before cellphones and the Internet, died Wednesday of cancer.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
By Michael Carroll I confess that I am a little envious of the peculiar and controversial public employee retirement program known as DROP, for Deferred Retirement Option Plan. I like the image, the sound of it, and the opening it provides for imagination. I would also like the money. Few inside Philadelphia government understand DROP completely, and even fewer outside have a clue. As I understand it, city employees declare their intention to retire in a few years, which is supposed to give the city time to plan for their departure.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joanne Williams has been riding Eugene "Smitty" Smith's Route 29 bus across South Philadelphia for many years. "He's an angel. He just don't want to marry me yet," she lamented the other morning. Since the SEPTA driver is retiring Tuesday, she knew this would be her last chance. At her stop, bracing herself on her cane, she whispered in his ear. "Nah," he replied, "my wife's a keeper. " They both smiled. Then she leaned in and gave Smitty a hug - he's been collecting many of those of late - and exited his bus at Broad Street for the last time.
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