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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 20, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
Bucks County District Attorney David W. Heckler, whose term is to expire in January 2018, announced Thursday he will retire in two weeks. County judges will choose an interim district attorney to serve until the November 2017 election. Heckler said that while any prosecutor in the office would be qualified, Chief of Prosecution Matthew D. Weintraub was "sort of the obvious choice" and he predicted Weintraub would win an election. In explaining his decision, Heckler, 69, said he had accomplished most of his goals and felt his value was coming to an end. "This was never going to be a long-term proposition for me," he said.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2016 | By Bob Fernandez, Staff Writer
Charisse Lillie, who headed the Comcast Foundation and was the point person for organizations seeking donations or philanthropic help from Comcast Corp., is retiring in January after 12 years at the cable giant. Lillie, 64, served as a human-resources vice president when Comcast rapidly expanded its workforce between 2005 and 2008. She is one of the company's top African American executives. "It's time for me to leave," Lillie said, adding, "I want to start a new chapter. I'm not exactly sure what the next chapter is, but I'm ready for a change.
NEWS
August 17, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Defense lawyers on Monday challenged a series of retired Philadelphia police homicide detectives on why they made Anthony Wright the prime suspect in the 1991 rape and murder of a 77-year-old Nicetown woman. "I was 18 years a detective," responded one of them, retired Detective Frank Jastrzemski. "This is real life, this isn't TV. " The steps that led to Wright's 1993 conviction and life sentence for the slaying of Louise Talley have come into question after new DNA testing undermined prosecutors' original theory in the case.
SPORTS
August 16, 2016 | By Marcus Hayes, Daily News Columnist
PLACIDO POLANCO retired Sunday as a Phillie. It shouldn't be the last time we hear from him. Polanco always played in the shadow of bigger names - Jim Thome, Pat Burrell, Bobby Abreu, Cole Hamels, Billy Wagner, Roy Halladay - but he belonged with them. He should be remembered as a hard-nosed Phillie with deep connections to the four hardest-nosed Phillies to play for the franchise in the past 20 years: Scott Rolen, Chase Utley, Thome and Carlos Ruiz. Polanco came to Philadelphia in 2002 and turned out to be the most valuable piece in the deadline deal that sent Rolen to the Cardinals.
NEWS
August 8, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When Frank H. Radey Jr. was 10 or 11, "he used to carry his shotgun to school," in Collingswood, his wife, Patricia, said he told her. After he had plugged a rabbit near Newton Creek now and then, "he would throw it up on his father's sister's front porch. " And after Aunt Hilda had taken it in for a few hours, "he would pick it up on the way home, so his mother could cook it, make a stew for him. " In the early 1940s, his wife said, "he was allowed to take a gun into school," and leave it with an official.
NEWS
August 5, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's top elections official defended his role Wednesday in postponing a controversial referendum to extend the retirement age of judges to 75. In a filing to the state Supreme Court, where he is a defendant in a suit over the ballot question, Secretary of State Pedro Cortes said "the need for certainty" drove his decision to move the referendum from the April primary until November. Cortes, a cabinet member in the administration of Democratic Gov. Wolf, did so this year at the request of Republican Senate leaders, who later moved to reword the question to eliminate any reference to the current mandatory retirement age of 70. Senate Democrats sued to stop Cortes, but he implemented the change nonetheless.
NEWS
August 4, 2016
SHOULD the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75? There are pros and cons on either side, but we don't have to guess what most voters think of the idea. A proposed amendment to increase the retirement age to 75 was defeated in the April primary. More than 2 million voters cast ballots on the issue. The final tally: 1,220,587 nays (50.99 percent) to 1,172,999 yeas (49.01), a difference of just under 2 percent. This wasn't the outcome supporters of the amendment wanted, so they did a mulligan.
NEWS
August 3, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
Pennsylvania's Supreme Court on Monday rejected a bid by two high-ranking GOP lawmakers to intervene in a legal battle over the retirement age of judges. With no explanation, the court denied the motion by Senate President Pro Tempore Joseph Scarnati (R., Jefferson) and Majority Leader Jake Corman (R., Centre). The ruling put the Republican leaders on the sideline of a closely watched battle that has erupted into a forefront issue for some of the state's top officials. At stake is a question to voters on the November ballot that would raise the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75 - a decision that could alter the partisan makeup of the Keystone State's highest court within the next year.
NEWS
July 31, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I recently retired, but I haven't told anyone. I receive widow's benefits, so I'm comfortable financially. I like my privacy, and I'm afraid things will change if I tell people about my retirement. My father is dying of cancer. My best friend says if I were her sister, she'd be mad at me. My sister lives a mile away and I don't want her dropping in on me. If she knew, she'd include me in everything she does. I feel this is my life and I want to enjoy it alone for the most part.
SPORTS
July 31, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
READING - It was an interesting transaction announced just as the minor-league season was getting underway. "OF Andrew Pullin retired," read the April 9 listing on the Florida State League's transaction log. Pullin hit 14 homers last season with high-A Clearwater to lead the Florida State League. And now he was retired at just 22. Pullin returned home for a month to Centralia, Wash. It was a break, he said, to clear his mind more than it was a retirement from baseball. There was a thought that Pullin was disappointed that he was assigned to start the season in Clearwater instead of double-A Reading.
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