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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 24, 2016
Myth Retirement is a time to pursue your passions. Spouses want to spend time together in retirement. Turning 50 prompts many people to start thinking about their retirement. Most people don't retire until they feel they have enough money saved. Reality Most view retirement as a time of freedom. 60 percent of men want to spend more time with their wives, but only 43 percent of women want to spend more time with their husbands. Turning 50 had little to no impact.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2016
Is freedom in retirement more important, or is having enough money? The answer might surprise you. A new survey reveals that money and financial pressures don't influence when people choose to retire as much was first thought. For many, it isn't just about money, but about the freedom to enjoy life. That's just one finding in a 2015 survey of 9,372 pre-retirees and 2,293 retirees (plus 451 people who plan never to retire) by Fidelity Investments, with the Stanford Center on Longevity.
NEWS
January 22, 2016
DEAR ABBY: We recently lost our dog, a 13-year-old springer spaniel, to old age. His passing has left a huge hole in our hearts and lives. We miss his companionship, his personality and the structure that caring for him brought to our lives. We're 51 and 60, own our home and are financially secure. Some of our friends are discouraging us from adopting another dog. They say we travel too much. Last year, we spent 12 weeks away from home. When we travel, we hire a trusted pet sitter to move into the house and attend to all our dog's needs.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Robert E. Coughlin, 88, of Chestnut Hill, a retired city and regional planner, died Thursday, Jan. 7, of heart failure at home. Born in Boston, he was the son of William and Helen Coughlin. Dr. Coughlin graduated from Roxbury Latin School and received a bachelor's degree from Harvard University, a master's degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a doctorate in city and regional planning from the University of Pennsylvania. He served in the Navy before and after college, attaining the rank of lieutenant junior grade.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Thomas J. Quinn, 67, of Phoenixville, a retired Philadelphia Police Department captain who served the force in numerous capacities, died Monday, Jan. 11, of cancer at home. Mr. Quinn lived in Philadelphia before moving to Phoenixville. He was a 1966 graduate of Cardinal Dougherty High School and a 2001 graduate of the FBI National Academy after four months of intensive training. Mr. Quinn began his career in 1969 as a patrolman in the 23d District of North Philadelphia. He went to the 24th District in Kensington and from there moved to the Highway Patrol for eight years.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John J. Sweeney, 85, of Wynnewood, a retired rear admiral in the U.S. Navy and later an insurance company executive, died Monday, Jan. 4, of prostate cancer at Lankenau Hospital. In a career that combined military service with business, Adm. Sweeney made a point of serving as an advocate for young people. Born in Tamaqua, Schuylkill County, he moved to Philadelphia with his family at age 10. He graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1948 and from St. Joseph's College in 1952 with a bachelor's degree in economics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My parents and in-laws are all retired and reasonably well-off. They've filled their retirements with joining musical groups, coaching kids' sports, visiting family, gardening, etc. My husband and I, meanwhile, are working four jobs between us just to pay the bills. Often, one or both of us works seven days a week. Literally, almost every time we talk to the parents, they start going on about how "busy" they are, how they don't have time to read, etc. Any advice on how not to explode when they start in on this?
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Peter Cameron, SCRANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE
SCRANTON - After a career in surgery that spanned four decades, Gino Mori decided to head back to medical school in 2013 to fill some gaps in his education. After all, he completed his undergraduate education in science at Pennsylvania State University in 1953, the year scientists James Watson and Francis Crick are credited with discovering the structure of DNA. "You can imagine that basic science had changed quite a bit," he said with a smile. The 83-year-old physician completed about 40,000 surgeries in his 371/2 years in medicine, but after retiring Jan. 1, 2001, his lifelong thirst for knowledge pushed him back to school.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
A longtime Delaware County legislator announced Thursday that he will retire. State Rep. William Adolph, the 14-term Republican from the 165th District, said he would not run for reelection this year. Adolph, chairman of the House appropriations committee since January 2010, is a key budget negotiator for the House Republican Caucus. He lives in Springfield Township, where he is a former president of the board of commissioners. Before his appointment to the appropriations committee, Adolph was chairman of the professional licensure and the environmental resources and energy committees.
NEWS
December 31, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
As head of the city's prisons, Louis Giorla does not get much fan mail, especially from inmates. But last week, a man in jail wrote to Giorla, thanking him for the holiday commissary bag of treats and toiletries given each inmate. "I just wanted to thank you," the handwritten letter said. "It's difficult being incarcerated this time of year. " Giorla, 59, who will retire as commissioner next week, still has the note on his desk, in a nearly empty office where awards and pictures sit on the floor or in boxes.
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