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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 24, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out recently waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you live or have you ever considered living in an adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 16, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, STAFF WRITER
Roger Dennis, dean of the Thomas R. Kline School of Law of Drexel University, plans to retire in June of 2017, university provost M. Brian Blake announced in a letter to the faculty and staff on Wednesday. Dennis is the founding dean of the law school, which opened its doors in 2007 and he was instrumental in seeing it through the American Bar Association accreditation process, completed in 2011. Blake said Dennis agreed to stay while the university conducts a national search for his replacement.
NEWS
April 15, 2016 | By John Timpane, STAFF WRITER
James Levine, leader of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City since 1976, has announced his retirement, according to a statement from the opera company. The statement said Levine would retire after the current season because of health reasons. Levine, 72, was to have conducted a series of concerts in Philadelphia in February - his first such appearances here in 20 years - but had to cancel them. He has been battling Parkinson's disease and seeking to adjust his medications so he could continue to conduct.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2016 | By Ed Condran, For The Inquirer
Veteran stand-up Dave Attell, 51, claims he is close to retiring. "I'm way too old to keep doing this," he said. "The travel sucks, and I'm out of touch. I just saw a bunch of kids with selfie sticks, and I make fun of them. I don't even know how to use them. I'm pretty ancient. " By stand-up standards, Attell, who will perform Friday at Bethlehem's Musikfest Cafe, is fairly young. Don Rickles, who is approaching 90, is on tour. George Carlin once said comedy was something a comedian could do until he died.
SPORTS
April 13, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, STAFF WRITER
THEY SAY that a referee is happiest when he can call a game and get out of the gym without anyone recognizing him. That never really was the case with Joey Crawford. He often drew attention to himself, whether it was because of the two technical fouls he called on Tim Duncan in 2007 for laughing on the bench, or the time he sprinted from the baseline to the foul line to strip the ball from Kevin Durant just before a foul shot to get something straight at the scorer's table. It didn't help matters that it was Game 5 of a 2014 first-round playoff matchup between Oklahoma City and Memphis.
NEWS
April 13, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - With barely two weeks until the primary election, and with some ballots already printed, the Wolf administration has agreed to delay a planned ballot question asking voters if the state should raise the mandatory retirement age for judges. The question on whether to allow judges to retire at 75 rather than the current 70 will be moved to the Nov. 8 ballot, said Jeff Sheridan, spokesman for Gov. Wolf. The eleventh-hour switch was pushed by Republicans who control the legislature and who were unhappy about the wording of the question.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
We naturally assume that our money managers, our financial advisers, our brokers have our best interests at heart, what's known as a "fiduciary" duty. If not ours, whose best interests are they representing? Well, by law, many of them weren't required to give our interests top priority - until now. The U.S. Department of Labor issued final rules Wednesday that hold financial advisers to a fiduciary standard if they work with retirement savings. That means they must work on their clients' behalf and generally avoid conflicts of interest.
NEWS
April 7, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - Three weeks before the polls open, Pennsylvania legislators want to halt plans to let primary voters decide whether to raise the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75. Republicans who control both chambers want to move the question from the April 26 primary to the Nov. 8 ballot. A key House committee passed a resolution Tuesday to postpone the ballot question, and the matter could come up for a vote on the chamber's floor as early as Wednesday. The Senate is expected to follow suit.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Older individuals are reinventing themselves by going back to the classroom. And in college-rich Philadelphia, they and their tuition dollars are welcome on campus. Some are like Howard Magen, a retired CPA who audits classes he loved during his original college days. Others are baby boomers facing retirement who want that longed-for degree before they run out of time, or to stay competitive in the workplace. Take Wanda Amaro, a human-resources executive who is earning her bachelor's degree at age 53. Many colleges offer low-fee or even free classes for seniors.
REAL_ESTATE
March 28, 2016 | By Jack Guttentag, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
Many homeowners today choose to retire, or are obliged to, before they have fully paid off their mortgages. With their incomes reduced, the required monthly mortgage payments can become burdensome. If a balance is not too large relative to the value of the home, it can be paid off with the proceeds of a home equity conversion mortgage (HECM), the reverse mortgage offered by the Federal Housing Administration, which has no required payment. If the borrower is 62, the balance of the old mortgage cannot exceed 50 percent of the value of the home; the cutoff rises to about 68 percent for a borrower age 87. The conversion of a standard mortgage to a reverse mortgage is not for everyone.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
Among the country's big Wall Street firms, senior-level African Americans financial advisers are rare, says Ajamu Loving. And he would know, being an adviser of color with a doctorate in financial planning. "I heard 7 percent of astronauts who traveled into space were black," says Loving, recalling an event featuring African American astronaut Leland Melvin in Tampa, Fla., last year. "It struck me that was better than the number of financial planners of color. " It's a stark reminder for a community that's challenged by the lack of diversity and a wealth gap, but that has the same need as everyone to save for retirement.
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