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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Pincus, 87, of Bryn Mawr, a retired insurance broker, died Monday, July 13, of Lewy body dementia at his home. Mr. Pincus was born in Philadelphia and graduated from West Philadelphia High School, where he served as student government president. He attended what is now Drexel University before graduating from the University of Miami. Because he was not drafted when he became eligible for military service, Mr. Pincus enlisted in the Army National Guard. Following his service, Mr. Pincus joined the family business, Albert A. Pincus & Sons, which had been in the wholesale meat industry since 1947.
SPORTS
July 10, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
TONY BRUNO is going out on top. Yesterday, the 63-year-old Philly native, who along with Josh Innes co-hosted Philly's No. 1-rated sports radio show on 94 WIP, said he is retiring. The two had only been paired since February when they took over the afternoon spot previously held by Anthony Gargano and Rob Ellis. Since then, the show has been the highest rated among males between the ages 25 and 54. Bruno, missing this week, said in a statement that speculation that he and Innes were feuding was not the reason for his decision.
NEWS
July 9, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James L. Sanderson began his teaching career at Berea (Ky.) College, after growing up in Hiseville, in southern Kentucky, where the 2010 U.S. census counted only 240 souls. "He always remained attached to the place," a son, Scott, said of the college, because of "the rural poor" among its students. "Berea charges no tuition, and admits only academically promising students, primarily from Appalachia, who have limited economic resources," the college website states. "He was always liberal," his son said, and he spent his two years there "trying to help others.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Sarai Flores, Inquirer Staff Writer
Claudette Elizabeth Harris, 75, a retired teacher and classroom aide for the School District of Philadelphia, died Friday, June 19, of a blood infection at Kindred Hospital. Ms. Harris was the youngest of 10 children of Ola Pearl Phillips-Wallace and Sylvester Wallace Sr. Her childhood experiences in South Philadelphia gave her two of what her family called her greatest gifts - cooking and educating others. "She was literally the family cook," said State Rep. Jordan Harris, one of her two grandsons.
NEWS
June 25, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
Edward J. Hanko, the FBI's top agent in Philadelphia, will retire next month after a 29-year career with the bureau, he announced to agents Tuesday. The Wilkes-Barre native has led the Philadelphia division - the bureau's eighth-largest office - since 2013, and oversaw an investigative force with an expanded focus on counterterrorism, cyber crime and public corruption probes. In an e-mail to colleagues, Hanko, 55, said he had accepted a position as "vice president [for] global security for a Fortune 500 company" and would leave his current post July 31 - two years short of the FBI's mandatory retirement age. Hanko did not respond to calls for comment Tuesday about his future position or his retirement, which had not been officially announced by the bureau.
NEWS
June 19, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JUST THE sight of Bill Grogan made people smile. Whether he was selling you a truck, holding forth at one of the community organizations to which he belonged, doing a job for his church, repairing a car, or building something out of wood, people knew that being around him would make them feel good. Maybe it was his Irish charm, his rich sense of humor, or just the fact that he was a generous, loving man who was always there to help anyone who needed a lift or a loan. "I never knew anybody like him," said his son, the Rev. Jim Grogan, a Roman Catholic priest.
SPORTS
June 13, 2015 | By Laine Higgins, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are many pictures in the office of Kevin Quinn, the man who coached nearly every St. Joseph's University runner for the last 49 years. After all that time, one picture stands out to the retiring coach. The picture is from 1979. Joe Genther, a gangly runner, gasps for air as he crosses the finish line to win the 1,000-meter run in the IC4A indoor championships at Princeton. In the background chasing Genther are three runners from Richmond, Fairleigh Dickinson, and Villanova who went on to make Kenya's Olympic team later in their athletic careers.
SPORTS
June 11, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
SAINT JOSEPH'S University track coach Kevin Quinn announced his retirement yesterday, ending a 49-year career at the school. When asked what he'll miss most, he answered faster than any of the runners he ever coached. "Saint Joseph's is an exceptional school and Saint Joseph's attracts exceptional people," Quinn said last night. "My fondest memories are the kids. I'm the youngest 74-year-old you'll ever see, and the reason is the great kids I've dealt with throughout the years.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | BY WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writer rudermw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5924
RESISTANCE IS futile. The crew of the starship Enterprise in "Star Trek" learned this well. And so, too, did Mayor Nutter and former Mayors Ed Rendell and Wilson Goode Sr. - at least when it came to Marciene Mattleman. When Mattleman, the feisty and unrelenting advocate for Philadelphia's children, called the Mayor's Office to ask for the city's assistance with one of her many new educational ideas, some of which came to her in the middle of the night, resistance was, well, "impossible.
NEWS
May 29, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
She has been described as a "force of nature," a "serial entrepreneur," a "doyenne. " But former Gov. Ed Rendell offered perhaps the most unvarnished - and true - assessment of Marciene Mattleman, a towering force for good honored at City Hall on Wednesday for her decades of accomplishments. "The secret to Marciene's success," Rendell said, "is that she's impossible. " That is: She has made a career of lifting up the city's most vulnerable - children, people who cannot read - often by sheer force of will.
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