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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in the South, Wilford "Will" Fuller, 44, who now commands a hefty salary as head of several divisions of Lincoln Financial Group, worked in a dye house, shoveling athletic socks into bleach vats. "We'd throw them into these big walk-in dryers," Fuller said. "We'd step into the dryer in hundred-degree heat and pitchfork" them out. Fuller now runs Lincoln's $124 billion annuity division and leads the entire company's sales operation, distributing Lincoln's retirement products through finance companies and advisers.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
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BUSINESS
May 22, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Watermark at Logan Square retirement complex was acquired earlier this month for $65.3 million by a company identified as SNR 21 Logan Square Owner, according to city records. The buyer shares a Texas address with Fortress Investment Group in a related document filed with the city. Watermark Logan Partners sold the property to SNR 21. Fortress spokesman Gordon Runte and Watermark spokeswoman Jill Hofer did not return calls seeking comment. The Watermark has 464 rental apartments and assisted-living units, according to the property's website.
NEWS
May 14, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ruth H. Loudon, 97, of Norristown, a banker so successful that she was coaxed out of retirement at age 74 to help build a local business, died Thursday, May 7, at home. Mrs. Loudon had put in a normal five-hour day Thursday at Systems Solution Inc. in King of Prussia, where she began work in 1992 after a long career in banking. She was found reclining in her favorite chair. Her death was due to heart failure. Mrs. Loudon's assignment at Systems Solution was to apply her years of experience, old-school work ethic, and patience to the task of expanding the business from just four workers to a company with 70 employees operating in a multitude of states.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in the South, Wilford "Will" Fuller, 44, who now commands a hefty salary as head of several divisions of Lincoln Financial Group, worked in a dye house, shoveling athletic socks into bleach vats. "We'd throw them into these big walk-in dryers," Fuller said. "We'd step into the dryer in hundred-degree heat and pitchfork" them out. Fuller now runs Lincoln's $124 billion annuity division and leads the entire company's sales operation, distributing Lincoln's retirement products through finance companies and advisers.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
By most standards, Arlene Brown says, she's an "old lady" well past her contributing prime. The reality, she believes, is that her true value began in retirement. At the orphanage and school known as Urukundo Village that Brown opened on 10 mountainside acres in Rwanda in 2006, the Pennsylvania native is adored as "Mama Arlene. " Now 84, she has devoted her retirement years not to cruising and golfing, but to giving a home and hope to some of Africa's neediest children. "I'm actually reaching a place where I almost like myself," she says.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The quality of the food, the variety of the entertainment, and the price of a haircut at a continuing-care retirement community (CCRC) are easy to evaluate. But assessing whether a continuing-care retirement community will have the financial resources to care for you for the rest of your life - the promise CCRCs make - is a much more onerous task. New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and other states do little more than provide a list of authorized CCRCs, publish a booklet of recommended questions for prospective residents to ask CCRC management, and require the CCRCs to disclose certain information.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
The only thing that Jon Hansen knows about Joe Davis is that he was a great hitter. "I know he's all over the record books," Hansen said. Davis wore No. 16 for the Cherry Hill East baseball team in the mid-1970s. Hansen wears it this season. Nobody will wear it next season. Or ever again. "Joe Davis epitomized what East baseball is all about," former Cherry Hill East coach Dave Martin said of the decision to retire Davis' number during a pre-game ceremony at the Cougars' baseball complex on Saturday morning.
SPORTS
April 29, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
WHEN JIM Murray began his long association with St. Joseph's Prep, Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, gas was 23 cents a gallon and James Dean was starring in "Rebel Without a Cause. " Sixty years later, Murray, Class of 1959, is still at 17th and Girard, although after this academic year, he will retire. Well . . . sort of. Murray, 73, will step down as athletic director, a post he's held since 1971, and no longer teach math - which he's done since '69. But he'll stay on as varsity soccer coach.
NEWS
April 29, 2015 | By Rick O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jim Murray, St. Joseph's Prep's athletic director, is retiring from the position after 46 years at the end of this school year. He will remain the school's varsity soccer coach, a position he has held since the team's inception in 1971. Since arriving at the Prep in 1969, Murray has served in many roles, both in the classroom and in the administration, including as dean of students in the early 1970s and chair of the mathematics department for a decade during which time he served on the academic council.
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Seffrin, 70, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society, will retire next Friday after 40 years with the venerable nonprofit cancer-fighting organization, including 23 at the helm. In an interview this week, he talked about some of the 102-year-old society's accomplishments under his leadership, financial issues, and his plans.   Progress against cancer In 2009, the society (ACS) trademarked the slogan "Official sponsor of birthdays" to highlight that its work to prevent cancer, detect it early, and improve treatment helps people live longer.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
I recently turned 29, which is the first birthday (for women) that people start consoling you over. But I wasn't bummed at all. I love cake. And I'm not afraid of getting older. I want to live forever. I just don't want to work forever. So this tax season, I realized I have to start saving for my retirement. I've never been a procrastinator, but it's hard to feel like you need to plan for something 35 years in advance. I haven't made plans for Memorial Day. But when I started doing the math, I got scared.
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