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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of SEPTA's delayed $130 million smart-card fare system retired last week and went to work for the company that is assisting SEPTA in creating the new system. John McGee, SEPTA's chief officer of new payment technologies, is prohibited by SEPTA rules from working on the SEPTA project for one year for his new employer, LTK Engineering Services of Ambler. A SEPTA spokesman said McGee's departure would not further delay the installation of the smart-card system, which will replace tokens, passes, transfers, and tickets on SEPTA's buses, subways, trolleys and, eventually, Regional Rail trains.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rules need to be enforced at Bartram High School, Ozzie Wright said: no hoodies, no cellphones, no showing up late, no lingering in the hallways. Adults need to listen to students, but students need to listen to adults. "We need to get this school under control," said Wright, a veteran troubleshooter, retired district principal, and retired Army captain. Wright, 65, was dispatched last week to calm Bartram, the Southwest Philadelphia school where brawls and open drug use have been common all year, and where a "conflict resolution specialist" was recently knocked unconscious by a student.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Say bye to Walters May 16 More than half a century after entering the TV news biz, Barbara Walters will retire from the tube after a final appearance on ABC's The View on May 16, the network, a unit of Walt Disney Co., announced Monday. "In this business there are legends, there are icons, and then there is Barbara Walters," Bob Iger , chairman and chief executive of the Walt Disney Co., said in a statement. "She broke barriers, defied convention, made history, and set the standard for journalistic excellence for more than 50 years.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
THE LATE night TV war will soon have another new combatant. After helping Lady Gaga and Bill Murray close down Manhattan's legendary Roseland Ballroom on Wednesday night's "Late Show," yesterday David Letterman announced the closing of his own show. The longest-running late night host in TV history said he will retire in 2015, when his current contract expires. He announced no specific end date, telling his audience he expects his exit will be in "at least a year or so, but sometime in the not too distant future - 2015, for the love of God, [band leader]
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
They stood at the lectern to talk about the rabbi who had strengthened their connection to Judaism despite what some may call obstacles. Todd Shotz is gay. Ashlee Check isn't particularly observant. Both say Rabbi Seymour Rosenbloom helped them carve out their own way of being Jewish. Now the rabbi who has led Congregation Adath Jeshurun in Elkins Park for 36 years is retiring, in part, he says, because he doesn't want to stand in the way of a synagogue and a faith tradition in transition.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Sidders Valdez, 73, of Sicklerville, who retired in 1999 after 28 years as a social worker at Ancora Psychiatric Hospital, died of cardiac arrest Thursday, March 27, at Virtua Marlton. Mrs. Valdez's work in mental health did not end when her Ancora career did, a colleague, Carol Weiss, said in an interview. "She was extremely active" with the nonprofit organization NJ Partners: Aging, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Inc., Weiss said. Its website states that it was founded to focus "on the needs of older adults with a mental health or substance abuse problem.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Lucy D. Savini, 80, of Hainesport, a registered nurse who, in retirement, cared for retired nuns in Philadelphia, died of liver cancer Friday, March 21, at home. Born in the Overbrook neighborhood of Philadelphia, Miss Savini graduated from West Catholic Girls' High School. She earned her nursing degree at St. Agnes Hospital School of Nursing in South Philadelphia and began her career there, before transferring to the former Presbyterian Hospital. Miss Savini was a nurse at Girard College in the 1980s and 1990s, her sister, Rita Giordano, said in a phone interview.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHAT'S A COP look like? Whatever it is, Vernon Cottman apparently fit the description. Not surprising, since he was a cop. It was true. He and his wife were in Lake Tahoe, Nev., for a police convention - but when they went into a casino, it was not where the convention was being held. Vernon was not in uniform. Nevertheless, a dealer told him he couldn't sit in a certain location because he was a cop. "We tried to figure out what a cop looks like," said his wife, Carol Kirkland Cottman.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
JOSE DIAZ did not flinch yesterday when a city prosecutor presented DNA and bloody-boot-print evidence that allegedly linked him to the December stabbing death of retired Villanova University professor Carol Ambruster. And at the end of the preliminary hearing, when Municipal Judge Teresa Carr Deni ordered Diaz to stand trial for murder, robbery and related counts, he remained just as unfazed. Defense attorney Benjamin Cooper, after the hearing, told reporters that Diaz, 42, was a handyman at Ambruster's Germantown apartment building, he knew her and was sad to hear that she had been killed, but was not guilty.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
WHEN THEY MET in 2010, she was 14 and he, a silver-haired 72-year-old, was old enough to be her grandfather. They met at Courtesy Stables in Andorra. She rode horses. Walter Sasse, a retired Philadelphia cop who spent 18 years on horseback in the elite Mounted Patrol, supervised the barn. At first, everything was ordinary, she said. But friendly hugs and kisses soon turned into romantic kissing and fondling. That escalated into a 2 1/2-year relationship that included frequent oral sex and masturbation until she ended things in December, she said.
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