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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 20, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - By the end of the year, 19 judges statewide could be forced to retire, including the chief justice of Pennsylvania's Supreme Court. By the end of next year, 28 more would be expected to join their ranks. Voters could change that in November, with a ballot question asking them to raise the mandatory retirement age for judges. But the pitched battle over its wording - which resulted in another high-profile Supreme Court ruling Friday and a promise for another challenge - has become testament to how high the stakes are for the bench.
NEWS
September 20, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Julie Baranauskas, 72, a Philadelphia educator and community activist in the city's Penn-Knox section, died at home Sept. 12, of heart failure. Mrs. Baranauskas taught high school English in the School District of Philadelphia for 22 years, starting in 1988. She passed on her love of works by authors ranging from William Shakespeare to Toni Morrison. At various times, Mrs. Baranauskas was assigned to Simon Gratz High School, Martin Luther King High School, Benjamin Franklin High School, Franklin Learning Center, and Universal Audenried Charter High School.
NEWS
September 20, 2016 | By Jake Corman
  A constitutional amendment is required to change the retirement age for judges in Pennsylvania. Both chambers of the General Assembly are required to undertake this change in two separate sessions and pass identical language, which takes four years. Only after that can the ballot question go to the voters. The process to place this question on the ballot has been transparent and the question is far from misleading. The legislation that passed the General Assembly twice in that four-year period included a sample ballot question that strongly resembled the final question from the secretary of state.
NEWS
September 20, 2016
The state Supreme Court's decision Friday to leave it to voters to decipher a misleading ballot question that would raise the mandatory retirement age for Pennsylvania judges from 70 to 75 is a self-serving affront to democracy. The court deadlocked earlier this month when asked to rule on litigation that questioned the ballot question's accuracy. Since it was unable to reach a decision, the high court should have allowed Commonwealth Court to review the matter. The original question, written for the April primary ballot, clearly stated its intent: to raise the retirement age from 70 to 75. But the Republican-controlled legislature changed the measure's wording at the last minute to remove any reference to the current retirement age and the primary results were voided.
NEWS
September 18, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - A controversial ballot question about when state judges must retire will appear on the November ballot. For now. The Supreme Court on Friday denied a request to keep alive a challenge to the wording of a referendum to determine how long judges can serve. At issue was a change to the ballot question this past spring by the Republican-controlled legislature. The initial language - which already had been printed on primary ballots - asked voters if they would approve raising the mandatory retirement age for judges from 70 to 75. But weeks before the primary, the legislature moved to change the question language and delay the referendum until November.
NEWS
September 16, 2016
Time is ticking for the state Supreme Court to let a lower panel decide whether voters should be asked to decipher a misleading question on the Nov. 8 ballot that seeks to raise the retirement age for Pennsylvania judges. The Supreme Court deadlocked earlier this month when it tried to decide whether the wording is proper. Since it was unable to reach a decision on the ballot question, which seeks to amend the state Constitution, it should let the matter be decided by the Commonwealth Court.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
ISSUE | PA. JUDGES Ballot question on retirement a scam As a committed voter who tries to keep up with issues, I am astounded that the Pennsylvania Supreme Court failed to make a decision on the wording of the ballot that deals with the mandatory retirement age of judges ("Judge retirement age question set for ballot," Sept. 4). Anyone with common sense sees this as the scam that it is - purposely giving voters less information to trick them into allowing judges five more years of feeding at the public trough.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Jonathan A. Minder, 74, of Southampton, a former computer systems manager, died of respiratory failure on Sept. 7, at Virtua Voorhees Hospital. Until earlier this year, he had been a member since 2009 of the board of trustees at the Southampton retirement community Leisuretowne and president of that board since 2014. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Minder graduated from Gloucester Catholic High School in 1959. From 1961 to 1981, he was an Air Force radar and computer worker. He was discharged as a master sergeant.
NEWS
September 11, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
William R. Toal Jr., 83, of West Chester, a retired Delaware County Court judge and a former prosecutor, died Wednesday, Sept. 7, at his home. He suffered from polymyositis, an inflammatory disease affecting the muscles, and died from complications related to the disease, son John said. Judge Toal was elected a judge in 1973 and then president judge in 1990. Three years later, he was appointed senior judge by the state Supreme Court and served until 2010, when he retired. Before his time on the bench, he worked in the Delaware County District Attorney's Office and rose to the rank of first assistant.
NEWS
September 10, 2016
By Kate Harper Most of us, thankfully, will never see the inside of a courtroom, but if we are there, it's not usually our choice. A teenaged child or grandchild's stupid action one hot Saturday night, a husband who moves out and then serves divorce papers, a car accident on a wet, slippery night - those are the things that get us a courtroom subpoena. Once we hire a lawyer we trust, we dress carefully, but not too flashy, pretend we are being cross-examined, and practice our answers over and over.
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