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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas and Tricia L. Nadolny, STAFF WRITERS
When the Kenney administration announced its new contract with the city's blue-collar union on Friday, it suggested that changes to the union's retirement plan would benefit the city's underfunded pension fund. "Making the pension fund sustainable has been a key goal of my administration from the beginning," Mayor Kenney said in the announcement of the $175 million four-year contract. But when questioned this week, administration officials could not say by how much the pension deficit would be reduced given the changes.
NEWS
July 22, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
  HARRISBURG —  Two former Pennsylvania Supreme Court justices and one of the region's most prominent lawyers filed suit Thursday to stop an eleventh-hour change in wording to a forthcoming ballot question on raising the retirement age for judges, calling it an attempt to hoodwink voters and influence the outcome. In the suit against the state's top election official, Pedro Cortes, former Chief Justices Ronald D. Castille and Stephen Zappala Sr. and Philadelphia lawyer Richard A. Sprague contend that the GOP-controlled legislature's revised language is "deceitful," and would deprive them and other voters of their constitutional right to have all the facts necessary to make an intelligent and fully informed decision on the measure.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
There were few things that Jerome Rodio, a retired Philadelphia police officer, loved more than fishing. On a dock last week on Chesapeake Bay, Rodio watched as an older man worked to bring up several crab traps. Rodio, 75, offered to help. A trap scratched the inside of Rodio's arm as he lifted it out of the shallow water. Three days later, Rodio, of Oxford, Chester County, was dead. "At one point he showed me the scratch and we laughed about it," said son Gene, who accompanied his father on a boat that morning to reel in perch.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2016 | By Erin Arvedlund, STAFF WRITER
Is Philly a retiree's dream city? According to Kiplinger's latest ranking, yes - the City of Brotherly Love helps seniors live healthier in the golden years. Kiplinger's says the most important component of a happy retirement isn't financial security or proximity to family and friends. It's good health. The magazine listed 12 retirement destinations that are "havens for healthy living, with lots of opportunities to pursue an active lifestyle and great medical facilities. " Philadelphia ranked 12th on the list cities.
NEWS
July 11, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
The call came in to the Cheltenham police station on a rainy night in 2009. A driver had struck an elderly woman along Church Road and then drove off. Frances Gordon died on her 85th birthday. No good tips ever came in. Seven years later, the hit-and-run death remains unsolved. For John Norris, it's cases such as Gordon's death that will haunt him the most. Norris retired at the end of June after a dozen years as Cheltenham's police chief. He cleaned out his office; the walls were stripped bare.
NEWS
July 9, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The GOP-controlled legislature was within its powers when it approved an eleventh-hour delay - and rewording - of a ballot question raising the mandatory retirement age for judges, a Commonwealth Court panel has ruled. A three-judge panel found that the legislature acted properly when it approved the delay just weeks before the April 26 primary, when the question was initially scheduled to appear on the ballot. Legislators sought the delay because they said they believed the wording was obscure and confusing.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
FAMILY MEMBERS say that had she been born in a different time there would have been no limits to what Ethel Marie Hendricks Taylor might have accomplished. Ms. Taylor, who grew up in South Philadelphia, died June 11. She was 90 years old. The retired federal worker considered the raising of her two Ivy League-educated daughters her proudest accomplishment. "If my mother met you and talked to you, within two minutes, she would let you know that she raised two doctors," said Dr. Susan C. Taylor, a noted Philadelphia dermatologist.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
Mary Ann Ryan McDonough, 76, of Medford, a former school labor union leader in Medford Township Public Schools, died on Thursday, June 16, at Virtua Memorial Hospital in Mount Holly following a heart attack. Mrs. McDonough was a bus driver for the Medford school system from 1967 until she retired in 1994. Her husband, James, said in an interview that she became the first president of the Medford Township Schools Support Union. "It took in mechanics, drivers, cafeteria workers," he said.
SPORTS
June 11, 2016
St. Joseph's Prep soccer coach Jim Murray will retire after the 2016 season, his 50th year in coaching and 46th at the Prep, the school announced. Murray, with 614 wins, is the second-winningest soccer coach in state history, according to the school. He became the first soccer coach at St. Joseph's Prep in 1971 and in 2006, according to the school, became the third soccer coach in Pennsylvania history to reach the 500-win mark. His team won the Catholic League title in 2010. Murray also coached for four seasons at Friends Central before his stint at St. Joseph's.
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, STAFF WRITER
Edythe Celestine DeGraffenriedt Porterfield loved many things. She loved entertaining friends and family and attending social events, and she loved going on outings to the theater, her family said. But her greatest love was reserved for her three children, to whom she devoted her life and served as a steady and vocal champion. Mrs. Porterfield, a retired federal employee, active church member and family matriarch known as Celeste to family and friends, died Saturday, May 21. She was 92 and lived in West Philadelphia.
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