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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 11, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Greenlee, the longtime head of the Defender Association of Philadelphia, who began her professional life as a high school language teacher and went on to develop and expand one of the nation's most prominent public-interest law agencies, on Tuesday announced her retirement effective March 1, 2015. Greenlee has served for 40 years with the association, which provides legal representation to thousands of low-income people in Philadelphia each year. For about 25 years, she has been chief defender.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration has invoked a provision of the controversial DROP retirement program to delay the departures of a dozen city managers and top officials who had planned on retiring next year. The administration cited the September 2015 World Meeting of Families, which includes a visit by Pope Francis, as a reason to extend the retirement dates for five managers, including the deputy commissioner for parks and recreation, Susan Slawson, and her chief of staff, Cynthia D. Douglas.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Stephen Holt came to Philadelphia to run the Visiting Nurse Association of Greater Philadelphia nearly a quarter-century ago, home health care was a "land of paper and pencil. " His staff had no GPS systems, laptops, or cellphones. Nurses did all their records and billing by hand, and had to call coworkers by landline. Now, as Holt prepares to retire Dec. 31, his nurses carry laptops, and can easily see what therapists and other practitioners have done with patients. "The nurse admits the patient at the bedside and pushes a button, and the billing starts," said Holt, 66. He is still so remarkably enthusiastic about his work that it's reasonable to wonder if he's ready to retire.
NEWS
November 26, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - One day soon, his portrait will hang next to Benjamin Franklin's in the main hall of the state Capitol. But on Monday, House Speaker Sam Smith (R., Jefferson) bid farewell to staff, lobbyists, and the press corps at a luncheon speech. During his talk, Smith served up stories about high points - a partisan conflagration in Gov. Rendell's office - and low points - the "Bonusgate" investigation - of his 28 years in the legislature. Smith, whose north-central Pennsylvania district is most famous as the home of Punxsutawney Phil, ends his three-year stint as speaker this month when he retires from office.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
CONVERSATIONS with my friends have increasingly concerned when we plan to retire. Some have done the math and figure they'll have to work longer at their current jobs, hoping they can boost their retirement savings before health issues set in. Yet studies show that what people expect regarding retirement doesn't often match what really happens. To that point, the Employee Benefit Research Institute has just issued a report about the gap between expected and actual retirement.
NEWS
November 14, 2014
I'VE BEEN INVITING readers to let me share their family financial feuds and offer my advice. The following is a dilemma one reader, who wrote to me during an online discussion, had with a sibling. The family background : "I am helping my niece pay for college," the person wrote. "I'm glad to do it, and she is doing terrifically well - nearly straight A's in a demanding program, got selected to a prestigious honor society, and is volunteering some time to a worthwhile cause - all the right things.
SPORTS
November 12, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is going to be an event, a celebration of everything he has accomplished. Bernard Hopkins said he has planned his farewell to boxing. And thinking about it makes the 49-year-old teary-eyed. Hopkins said his career is worth too much to simply retire in a quick postfight interview. His retirement is not an announcement, it is a statement, Hopkins said. He wants to retire with a farewell bout, one billed as his final fight: win, lose, or draw. "It isn't going to be a cheap, cheesy one. 'I'm done, I'm going, had a great time, bye ya'll,' " said Hopkins, who will turn 50 in January.
SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
After almost four decades coaching boys' soccer, including the last 28 seasons at La Salle, Bob Peffle has announced his retirement. Peffle, 67, took over as Explorers coach in 1987, and while the first few years were rough, he soon built the program into one of the best in the Catholic League and all of Southeastern Pennsylvania. "There is no perfect time or perfect year for this," Peffle said Thursday. "I just hope and pray that [the team members] understand that this is when it fits for myself and my family.
SPORTS
October 29, 2014
AFTER 19 SEASONS, Bishop McDevitt basketball coach Jack Rutter has retired. Rutter, a retired member of the Philadelphia Police Department, will also no longer teach at the school and has accepted a job in the criminal-justice arena. Last season, the Lancers made the playoffs and finished 5-8 in Catholic League play and 12-13 overall. Eight years ago, he took time off to battle - and beat - stomach cancer. Among several players he coached, Rutter mentioned standout Ryan Presson, the son of Temptations tenor Ronald Tyson Presson (stage name Ron Tyson)
NEWS
October 29, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JIM MOFFATT once wrote that he used to tell his journalism students at Rutgers-Camden, "Just remember that while you guys are doing sex and drugs on Friday nights, I'm chasing commas at the Inquirer. " It never failed to get a laugh, although he wrote that once, after delivering the quip, an older student remarked, "Mr. Moffatt, you ought to get a life. " "Gee, I said to myself, I thought I had a life," he wrote. The piece was a sort of farewell note to the newspaper business, printed in the Inquirer on Nov. 11, 1996, shortly before his retirement after 32 years as a copy editor.
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