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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
John Seffrin, 70, chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society, will retire next Friday after 40 years with the venerable nonprofit cancer-fighting organization, including 23 at the helm. In an interview this week, he talked about some of the 102-year-old society's accomplishments under his leadership, financial issues, and his plans.   Progress against cancer In 2009, the society (ACS) trademarked the slogan "Official sponsor of birthdays" to highlight that its work to prevent cancer, detect it early, and improve treatment helps people live longer.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Francesca Serritella, For The Inquirer
I recently turned 29, which is the first birthday (for women) that people start consoling you over. But I wasn't bummed at all. I love cake. And I'm not afraid of getting older. I want to live forever. I just don't want to work forever. So this tax season, I realized I have to start saving for my retirement. I've never been a procrastinator, but it's hard to feel like you need to plan for something 35 years in advance. I haven't made plans for Memorial Day. But when I started doing the math, I got scared.
NEWS
April 18, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marjorie Ross Traver, 90, of Mount Holly, a retired credit manager for the Burlington County Times, died Sunday, April 12, at her home. A 50-year resident of Mount Holly, Mrs. Traver died the day before her 91st birthday. Born in Pawtucket, R.I., she graduated from Cranston (R.I.) High School, and studied drawing and painting at the Rhode Island School of Design in Providence. In the 1950s, while raising her family in Cedar Grove, Essex County, Mrs. Traver "went to houses and interviewed people" for the public opinion polling firm founded by George Gallup, daughter Susan Skoviak said.
NEWS
April 15, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Msgr. James Mortimer reached 75, the mandatory retirement age for Archdiocese of Philadelphia priests, he wanted to keep his pastorate. Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua said no. "He made no exceptions," said Mortimer. "But at that time, we had oodles of priests. " So Mortimer went elsewhere to continue his ministry. He taught in Rome, and lived for a bit in South Dakota, where he filled in for priests on sabbatical. These days, he's back in Philadelphia, and even at age 88 he routinely gets called to replace parish priests who go on vacation or fall ill. "When I came back ... the diocese was begging for help," said Mortimer.
SPORTS
April 10, 2015 | BY PAUL DOMOWITCH, Daily News Staff Writer pdomo@aol.com
'I'M JUST a kid from north Philly. The streets were my playground. Hunting Park was my field for baseball, at which I was not very good. And the alleys were my hiding place. But there was always one continuous factor in my childhood. In fact, in my whole life. And that was that I loved football. "I didn't get big, but I gave it a shot when I could. Both in high school and in the sandlots. I was blessed to do the next best thing. I worked in professional football. The Philadelphia Eagles became my second home.
NEWS
April 9, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
David Samson, who chaired the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey when the agency became embroiled in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure scandal, is retiring from the law firm he founded. Samson resigned from the Port Authority board in March 2014 as Gov. Christie, a possible Republican presidential contender, sought to move past the controversy. But Samson remained a presence at Wolff & Samson, the West Orange, N.J., firm he cofounded in 1972. The firm announced Tuesday that it was undergoing a leadership transition and would take the name Chiesa Shahinian & Giantomasi P.C. Samson, 75, will retire this month, the firm said.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
ACTS Retirement-Life Communities Inc. said Tuesday that it would spend $300 million over three years on renovations to its 23 continuing-care retirement communities in eight states, including $120 million at eight campuses in Bucks, Delaware, and Montgomery Counties. The nonprofit, based in West Point, Montgomery County, said the biggest Philadelphia-area project would be $40 million in upgrades at Granite Farm Estates near Media, including a bistro cafe, a fitness center, a heated indoor pool, and larger independent-living apartments.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
ANYONE with a problem, no matter how severe - or even how minor - could count on a listening ear from Clinton H. Muir. "If you needed it, he would plead a case for you," said his longtime companion, Goldie Kennedy. "He was a magnificent man, very generous, and always reaching out to help someone. " Clinton Muir, retired administrator for the Social Security Administration, a devoted churchman and civic leader, died last Monday of a heart attack. He was 93 and lived in Oak Lane.
SPORTS
April 3, 2015 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
THE EAGLES yesterday announced the retirement of 65-year-old Harold Carmichael, who lost his player development role early in the Chip Kelly regime and since has been working in fan relations. The team said Carmichael, an Eagles Hall of Fame receiver, will continue to work informally as an ambassador for the team. "I have so many memories. I grew up as a football player in this city and with this team and it was special," Carmichael, whose 579 catches for 8,978 yards remain franchise records, told the Eagles' website.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
During his 54-year career, Bill Fritz and the men and women he trained won enough championships, titles, and honors to fill a trophy room. Or a hall of fame. But what the beloved cross country and track and field coach most wants to show me is a black-and-white photo of his father, Eugene. "I can't say enough about him," says Fritz, 76, who retired from Rowan University in 2014 after coaching 69 NCAA Division 3 national champions, 277 All-Americans, and 44 NJAC champions. He also trained four-time NCAA champion javelin-thrower Mike Juskus.
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