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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Writers Group
WHEN PEOPLE talk about retirement, it's often in the context of how much money they have to save for their senior years. People know or have heard enough that they need to factor into their retirement plan their cash savings, investment account holdings, Social Security and, if fortunate, any pension benefit. But what's often not emphasized enough is the importance of your family balance sheet. I thought about this as I read a new report from the Government Accountability Office about the increase in the number of older Americans who drag student-loan debt into their senior years.
NEWS
September 12, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Another former Philadelphia school principal has surrendered professional credentials in connection with a city cheating scandal. Arthur "Larry" Melton, retired principal of Bok High School, gave up his teaching and administrative credentials over allegations that he "violated the integrity and security" of standardized state tests "over multiple years," according to the state Education Department. Melton, 70, was the longtime principal of Bok, a career and technical high school in South Philadelphia that closed in 2013.
NEWS
September 10, 2014 | Michelle Singletary, The Washington Post Writers Group
EVERY TIME one of my children says, "Back in your day . . . ," I wince. After watching an old black-and-white sitcom, my son actually asked me if there was color television back in my day. His sisters thought it was funny. Me? Not so much. I will say this: Back in the day, retirement was a lot less complicated. It was pretty much black and white - simple. I try not to curse, but seriously, retirement planning these days will take you there. Figuring out all the various parts and rules of Medicare alone requires a bottle of aspirin and some choice words.
NEWS
August 28, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
I T DIDN'T TAKE a whole lot to make Jon Weir happy: his wife's spaghetti-and-meatballs dinner, a souvenir hat from a sporting event, a stroll along State Street in Media, watching his children play sports, a bike ride on the Ocean City boardwalk. For a man who was exposed as a newspaper copy editor to the frequently painful reality of breaking news for 46 years, his need for simple pleasures was understandable. Colleagues remember a devoted professional who could keep his cool even when big news was breaking on deadline, and could be counted on to get the copy out, clean and clear.
NEWS
August 27, 2014
A RECENT COLUMN about the importance of getting your Social Security statement prompted a lot of retirement questions from readers. In turn, the questions reminded me just how complicated it is to retire these days. We chide people for not saving enough, but as one reader noted, that's almost the easy part. Trying to understand the many rules, and caveats to the rules, makes planning for retirement so difficult. Readers wanted to know about a plan by Social Security to resume paper statements.
SPORTS
August 22, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
A.J. BURNETT'S answer wasn't definitive, but it did reinforce the widely held belief that the veteran pitcher would lean toward retirement when the 2014 season ends. After taking the mound for his 27th start of the season on Tuesday night, Burnett earned himself a half-million dollars (a performance bonus in his contract) and set himself up to make $1.5 million more for next year, too. Burnett's player option for the 2015 season can increase twice more this season if and when he reaches 30 and 32 starts on the season.
NEWS
August 21, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman and Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writers
State Senate President Stephen Sweeney says he will accept Gov. Christie's changes to a bill intended to expedite development of privately run public "Renaissance" schools in Camden. Christie, a Republican, axed a provision in the legislation that would have allowed the Camden school board to provide pension sweeteners as early-retirement incentives to some district employees. The state-run district laid off 200 teachers last spring because of budget cuts. "I am disappointed with the governor's conditional veto, but I am committed to moving the bill forward," Sweeney (D., Gloucester)
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Carol Wolff took over as the head of the Camden branch of a federally funded community health organization, a disease was making headlines as "gay-related immune deficiency," or "gay cancer. " As HIV and AIDS became better understood, Wolff led her organization, the Camden Area Health Education Center, to establish a clean-needle exchange, group and individual counseling for those with HIV or AIDS, and HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness campaigns. The community-based mission led the group to create, in 1996, a weekly summertime farmer's market in downtown Camden.
NEWS
August 13, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Marvin B. Pittman, 71, a retired Philadelphia police officer and music collector, died last Tuesday, Aug. 5, of complications from cancer at Nazareth Hospital. Called "Bobby" by his friends, Mr. Pittman joined the Police Department in 1973. He retired four years later after sustaining injuries in an auto accident while on duty. Despite retiring, he remained active in the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5. He later worked as a garage security guard at Pennsylvania Hospital, and for SpectaGuard Inc. He stopped working in 2001.
SPORTS
August 11, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
DURING SPRING training, Roy Halladay regularly reported to work at Bright House Field hours before the sun rose each morning. The dedication to his craft continued into the season. He was meticulous in his routine. Almost every minute of his day was accounted for and had a purpose. Step in his direction when he was making his way from a bullpen session to the weight room and you'd see the steely look of a guy you really didn't care to interrupt. But then one day in Clearwater, a video-game commercial featuring the pitcher and a Carlos Ruiz pillow began airing regularly.
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