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Retirement

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NEWS
October 5, 2005 | By Lini S. Kadaba INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Liberation. Refinement. Or, perhaps, afterlife. Those are some alternatives to the word retirement posted on an Inquirer discussion board on the subject. Many age-conscious baby boomers don't like the R word, which, some argue, connotes disengagement from life. They prefer to call it the "next stage" or "second calling" or anything but "retirement. " So say experts. Some posts defended the word: "Retirement is my favorite word. I just wish it wasn't so far away.
NEWS
January 18, 1998
Like teenagers seeking concert tickets, about 50 senior citizens camped out last weekend waiting to buy lots in Middlesex County's newest "active adult community. " They were interested in the indoor and outdoor pools, golf course, 25 hobby clubs and 24-hour on-site nursing care. Do you or have you ever considered living in a adult-only retirement community? How did you make your decision? Send responses to Community Voices/Retirement at the address in the Where to Write box above.
NEWS
August 6, 2007 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In his 23-year run as president of Philadelphia University, James P. Gallagher presided over nothing short of a transformation. Enrollment nearly doubled. So did the campus acreage. Applications grew fourfold. What was once a textile and science college became a university, with new academic programs. Up went several recreational and academic buildings, and a virtually nonexistent endowment reached nearly $30 million. So perhaps it's fitting that, in his final months, the 66-year-old native West Philadelphian - who recently emerged as one of the most highly compensated college presidents in the country - has decided to focus on the finer points of collegiate management.
NEWS
February 16, 1986
As a discussion leader of a retirement program for many years and as a retiree, I appreciated George Wilson's Feb. 7 column on retirement. It was well written, very interesting and its criticism of rigid planning very logical. A retiree's adjustment to freedom of time is accepted in different ways and therefore varies with the individual. Certainly the capability or desire to adjust to the change and to the enjoyment of the retiring years is stimulated by a retirement program and is flexible by a casual determination or a specific one as to the scheduling of events to come.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2007 | By Madhusmita Bora INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vanguard Group, seeking more coordination among its retirement planning services, is consolidating much of that work under one umbrella. The Malvern mutual-fund giant announced yesterday that Ann Combs, a former assistant secretary at the U.S. Department of Labor, would head its new Institutional Strategic Consulting Group. The team will bring together business units, including the company's retirement-research and plan-consulting groups, which shape the retirement agenda for Vanguard and its clients.
SPORTS
September 10, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
Mark Messier will not report for a training-camp physical with New York Rangers veterans on Monday. He might, however, take the opportunity to announce his expected retirement. The 44-year-old legendary leader and six-time Stanley Cup champion has not commented publicly on his playing status in 2 months - since telling the New York Daily News he would consider offers from any of the NHL's 30 teams. It is expected he will have a role in the Rangers' organization, and that announcement could come as early as Monday.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Columnist
Everybody should plan for retirement, but if you are working, there are good reasons not to actually retire if your health allows - at least not yet. About 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day, according to this post at bankrate.com, which lists seven "signs" that retirement might not be the best idea for each of them. In addition to financial reasons, the list includes warnings that you shouldn't retire just because of your age and certainly not if you don't know what you'll do with time on your hands.
NEWS
September 17, 1989 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Capt. Robert Deeds, head of the 15th Police District at Harbison Avenue and Levick Street since February, retired abruptly from the police force on Tuesday. Inspector William McDonough, commander of the Northeast Police Division and Deeds' immediate supervisor, said he had not expected Deeds' decision. "I was surprised. It's a shame to see someone go who knows his job," McDonough said. A replacement was to have been named Friday, when citywide command reassignments were to be announced.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | BY VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writer vellav@phillynews.com, 215-854-2513
PERRY BETTS lost his job as a Philadelphia Police officer, won it back and then nearly lost it a second time after testing positive for marijuana. Emphasis on "nearly" - Betts, a former narcotics officer, officially retired Aug. 10, the same day Commissioner Charles Ramsey was set to suspend him for 30 days with intent to dismiss, a police spokeswoman told the  Daily News  on Wednesday night. "He will not be able to return," Ramsey said to the People Paper in an Aug. 6 story detailing Betts' failed drug test.
BUSINESS
August 21, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA general manager Joseph M. Casey will step down on Sept. 30, after seven years in the position and 34 years with SEPTA. The leading candidate to replace Casey, an accountant, is deputy general manager Jeffrey D. Knueppel, a professional engineer in charge of rebuilding much of SEPTA's infrastructure. SEPTA's board of directors is expected to name Casey's replacement next month. Casey's tenure was marked by increasing ridership, improved state funding, new trains and buses, and national recognition: In 2012, SEPTA was named the best large transit system in North America by the American Public Transportation Association, and this year, SEPTA placed 33d in Forbes magazine's list of the nation's 500 best employers.
SPORTS
August 20, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
   Danny Briere thought briefly about playing another year and even kicked around the idea of trying to finish his career as a fourth-liner with the Flyers. But in the end, the diminutive center decided it was more important to spend quality time with his three teenage sons before they head to college in a few years. Briere, 37, announced Monday that he was retiring after a 17-year NHL career. He held an emotional farewell news conference at the Skate Zone in Voorhees on Tuesday while his three sons Caelan, Carson, and Cameron watched from the back of the room.
SPORTS
August 20, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer neiburj@phillynews.com
WHEN IT CAME time for Daniel Briere to decide in 2007 where his future in hockey would continue, the Quebec native was at a crossroads. The diminutive forward who many thought was too small and fragile to play in the National Hockey League was coming off a career-high 95-point season with Buffalo. The Sabres had the most wins in the league in the 2006-07 season and fell in the conference finals for the second straight season. But the one-year, $5 million contract awarded to him in arbitration the prior offseason had expired, and it was time for him to decide his future.
SPORTS
August 19, 2015 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Danny Briere, the undersized center who led the Flyers to the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals, announced his retirement from hockey on Monday after a 17-year NHL career. "After taking a few weeks to think about it, it's time to hang them up and spend a little more time at home with the family," said Briere, 37, who lives in Haddonfield. ". . . The Flyers are where I played the bulk of my career. I've had a great time in Philadelphia and have been very, very fortunate to have the chance to play here.
NEWS
August 17, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm retiring at the end of this year after 50 years of full-time employment and I'm very excited about it. Looking back over my life, I see there have been several life-changing events . . . marriage, the births of our children, buying a home and, now, retirement. My wife gets irritated every time I say (about twice a week), "When I retire. " I'm looking forward to all sorts of activities that I'll have time for. Why can't she be excited too? She makes snide remarks like, "Well, when you retire, you won't have anything to say. " The implication is that all I talk about is my retirement, which isn't true.
NEWS
August 7, 2015
AS WITH A CATEGORY 5 hurricane, Americans are in for catastrophic problems if we fail to address the looming retirement crisis. Retirement planning cannot be shoved down on your to-do list. If you're in your 20s, start thinking about it now, because you've got plenty of time to correct the things that people in their 30s, 40s and 50s wish they hadn't put off. In its annual long-term financial outlook, the Social Security Board of Trustees said the trust funds that make old-age and disability payments are projected to run out of money by 2034, with only 79 percent of benefits payable.
NEWS
July 31, 2015 | By Justine McDaniel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents questioned township supervisors in a Chester County township Wednesday night, at a special meeting called to address allegations that officials made a secret deal to keep paying the longtime police chief after he retired. In a lawsuit filed last week against Kennett Township and the former chief, Albert McCarthy, Michael Hammon contends the supervisors signed a retirement pact with McCarthy on May 7, but never publicly discussed or voted on it, violating Pennsylvania's Sunshine Act. Supervisors and their legal counsel would not answer questions Wednesday about whether the agreement violated the Sunshine Act or why the agreement was not approved at a board meeting.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fans and foes of Bill Spingler agree on at least one thing. "He was able to get things done," said Delaware County Democratic Chairman David Landau, an admirer of the longtime county Democratic political figure. "When he wanted to get something done, he got it done," said Sara Pilling, a recently acquired adversary. She fought Spingler, then president of the Radnor Township Board of Commissioners, on a plan approved last week for new dormitories for Villanova University, Spingler's alma mater.
NEWS
July 22, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jack Pincus, 87, of Bryn Mawr, a retired insurance broker, died Monday, July 13, of Lewy body dementia at his home. Mr. Pincus was born in Philadelphia and graduated from West Philadelphia High School, where he served as student government president. He attended what is now Drexel University before graduating from the University of Miami. Because he was not drafted when he became eligible for military service, Mr. Pincus enlisted in the Army National Guard. Following his service, Mr. Pincus joined the family business, Albert A. Pincus & Sons, which had been in the wholesale meat industry since 1947.
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