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Retirement Home

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NEWS
May 27, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
A Cherry Hill developer wanting to build a retirement home on Kresson Road can expect a fight from Barclay Farm residents who oppose business encroachment in their Cherry Hill neighborhood. About 40 Barclay Area Civic Association members met Tuesday to discuss strategy for defeating the proposal for a three-story building at Kresson and Pearlcroft Roads. Because the 2.5 acres are zoned for residential use, builders Edward and Lee Rudow must win the township Zoning Board's approval for commerical use on the land.
NEWS
December 8, 2002 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Alvetta Bailey's baking may be one reason Haddonfield Home's open house is so successful each year. Make that a big reason. No, make that a very big reason, said Brenden Garozzo, director of the assisted-living facility in Haddonfield. The home's long-standing tradition - a holiday gift to the community - always features Bailey's Christmas cookies, apple cake, gingerbread houses, yule logs, sweet-potato pie, pumpkin bread, and other culinary delights of the season. This year's open house is scheduled for today.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2008 | By Janet Pinkerton FOR THE INQUIRER
Whether you're moving, remodeling or staying put, planning a retirement home is an opportunity to create a personal environment that takes into account your future accessibility, safety and financial needs. And, experts say, there is no reason to forget style. Accessibility concerns - whether because of aging or physical limitations - are part of Valarie Costanzo's practice as a real estate agent for Prudential Fox & Roach in Rittenhouse Square and Haddonfield. Costanzo, 57, began concentrating on the accessibility niche after she was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis two years ago. She began helping MS Society clients in search of affordable handicapped-modified housing.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | By Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Gladys White turned 72, she could not afford a decent apartment and had little hope of living the next few years among friends. All that changed when she became a resident at Kearsley, a 223-year-old retirement community in the Wynnefield section of Philadelphia. White lives in a pleasant apartment, receives good care and goes shopping and enjoys other activities with her numerous new friends. Today, at 75, she cannot imagine what life would be like outside her new home. "Kearsley has been a lifesaver," she said.
REAL_ESTATE
October 8, 1989 | By Neill A. Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buying into a retirement community could be the biggest investment of your life, overshadowing even the purchase of your first house. Experts in and out of the industry suggested the following items to consider when planning for retirement living: BE A SKEPTIC. Understand that promotional material is just that. Brochures and pamphlets are designed to promote the retirement community and stress its best aspects. VISIT THE COMMUNITY. Spend a day or two looking around. Talk with the residents.
NEWS
September 2, 2001 | By Robert F. O'Neill INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Studies have indicated that most older people prefer to live independently in their own homes as long as possible, counting on loved ones and community-based services for occasional needs. When that is no longer possible, however, choosing a retirement community becomes one of the most important decisions seniors can make. To help sort out the maze of options, ACTS Retirement Life Communities Inc., a nonprofit organization in West Point, Pa., has compiled the following list of tips for people contemplating a move: Consider the community setting.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | By Carol D. Leonnig, Special to The Inquirer
Residents of the Barclay Farms section are expected to show up in force tomorrow to quash a proposed retirement home in their residential Cherry Hill neighborhood. Members of the Barclay area civic association have argued that the proposed location - on a 2.5-acre parcel on Kresson Road across from the James Johnson School - is a bad spot for a retirement home. At tomorrow's Zoning Board meeting, neighbors plan to ask the board to turn down the developer's request for a special variance allowing the home on a property zoned residential.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | By Suzanne Sczubelek, Special to The Inquirer
A plan for a retirement home in West Chester has been transformed into a proposal for 55 condominiums because the developer says the new project would make more money. "The financial climate has changed," said Paul Robino, chairman for Frank Robino Associates of Wilmington, testifying before the Zoning Hearing Board Monday night. Robino asked permission to build 10 units on the first floor of the former Denney-Reyburn Building, which is commercially zoned. He also requested the freedom to decide the size of all the units in the building, at 30 W. Barnard St., and to be exempt from having to landscape the parking lot. The board has 45 days to vote on his application, which was opposed by all but a few of the residents at the meeting.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
Robert Ryan was just looking for a little direction from the Plymouth Planning Commission in his efforts to build a single-family home where he and his wife could grow old together. What he got from the commission Thursday night was an on-the-spot positive recommendation of his plans to the Township Council. Ryan, who is about to retire, owns a 3.79-acre parcel of land at 208 Township Line Rd., next to Valley Green Estates. He inherited the land when his father died. At the front of the property is a single-family home where his daughter and son-in-law reside.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2013 | By Diane C. Lade, SUN SENTINEL
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - The kitchen features a hutch with lovely antique blue-and-white plates. One bathroom has a walk-in shower. And lounge chairs surround a good-sized shaded pool in the back. So what makes this seven-bedroom property different from other large homes nearby? It's South Florida's first gay retirement home. Tom Duffy, a retired catering business owner, converted what once was a small Wilton Manors assisted-living facility to create his dream: Secret Garden, an independent living center where gay men can be themselves as they age. "I want it to be like a family, more like a commune, I guess," said Duffy, 61, who lives on the property and has been interviewing prospective residents in recent weeks.
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TRAVEL
July 25, 2016 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
There were so many baby goats surrounding farmer Petter Melchior, he was practically submerged. Having heard his call, the kids had scrambled down the craggy mountainside to be fed. Oblivious to the scenery, which included a stunning waterfall, they were rooting in every nook, cranny, and pocket in search of breakfast. This was at the end of the road in Norddal, Norway, a no-stoplight hamlet in the midst of the country's famed Fjordland region. Millions of people flock to Norway annually for its breathtaking scenery, yet there are more subtle sights that warrant exploration: those preserving Norwegian heritage.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
William A. Del Monte, 109, the last survivor of the devastating San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906, died Monday at a retirement home in nearby Marin County. He was 11 days shy of his 110th birthday. His niece, Janette Barroca of San Francisco, confirmed his death of natural causes. He'd been doing "great for 109 years old," Barroca said Monday. Mr. Del Monte was just 3 months old when the quake struck, forcing his family into the streets to escape in a horse-drawn buckboard with fire burning on both sides, Barroca said.
NEWS
December 24, 2015
SHERIFF JEWELL Williams said he was surprised at the federal indictment of his predecessor, John Green, on charges of bribery and fraud. If Williams is surprised, he is the only one in town. People have been waiting for the other shoe to drop ever since City Controller Alan Butkowicz released an audit in 2010 outlining the multitude of problems in Green's office. Lost money. Cronyism. Staggering mismanagement. Green, who had been sheriff since 1988, abruptly retired a few weeks before the Butkowitz audit was made public.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Former Philadelphia Sheriff John D. Green's two decades in office were plagued by troubling audits and allegations from city and state watchdogs of cronyism, mismanagement, and fraud. On Friday, federal authorities added a new wrinkle to the legacy of the retired lawman, accusing him of taking bribes worth six figures from a top campaign donor and friend who was granted a virtual stranglehold over $115 million in Sheriff's Office contracts. Prosecutors allege that Green, 68, all but handed over the reins of one of the major duties of his office - managing court-ordered sales of foreclosed properties - to advertising and title firms owned by James R. Davis Jr., 65, of Wyncote.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
DEAR ABBY: I loved the letter from "Ready for the Reunion" who wondered why some people in her high-school graduating class didn't respond to the notice of the reunion. Some of us would like to completely forget high school and everything associated with it. I missed my 10th, 20th, 30th and 40th year reunions. I did consider going to the last one, but then I started reading my former classmates' posts on the reunion website. It seems everyone is retired, wealthy, has numerous grandchildren, at least one retirement home in an exotic locale and spends time relaxing and jetting around (or so they say)
NEWS
October 23, 2015
D EAR ABBY: My daughter has been in a lesbian relationship for 14 years. They recently took me to lunch and informed me that her partner, "Nicole," is in the process of transitioning to a male. Nicole has now legally changed her name to "Nick" and has begun hormone treatments. They have been going to counseling for the past six months. Since Nick began the transition, I have seen him three times. Last week when I was visiting, I accidentally called Nick by the wrong pronoun, "she" instead of "he" a couple of times.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Francis X. McNeila, 81, of Somers Point, N.J., a former pressman for the Bulletin and then for The Inquirer, died of metastatic liver cancer on Sunday, Feb. 8, at a daughter's home in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. After he retired, Mr. McNeila was a Eucharistic minister, distributing Communion at St. Joseph Church in Somers Point. "He would also distribute Communion to patients at Shore Medical Center" in Somers Point who couldn't get to Mass, said a daughter, Frances Ryder. "He did genuinely feel it was important that people maintain their faith, even when they were sick," she said.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charlie Vogel is a familiar face - a celebrity of sorts - in the Hershey's Mill retirement community in East Goshen, Chester County. In a dozen years or so, he has done more than 100 interviews for the community's Channel 20 TV station, which reaches 1,700 homes. Among his most memorable guests were former Phillies manager Charlie Manuel, Phillies second baseman Chase Utley, Phillies' Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn, and TV weather forecasters Herb Clarke and Cecily Tynan. Vogel also interviewed Bill Campbell, the famed Philadelphia sports broadcaster who called Wilt Chamberlain's 100-point game in 1962.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
Leslie and Curtis Pontz's new house almost looks like a child's drawing: three gray boxes trimmed with a red door and window frames that contrast with the deep green trees and grass of the Wissahickon woods. Its simple appearance is deceptive. The West Mount Airy house is a combination of retreat, artist's studio, retirement home, and dream house - 40 years in the making. In 1973, after Leslie and Curtis married, they bought an old, three-story traditional house, promising each other it would only be a few years until they built the house they really wanted - in other words, a midcentury modern dream.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia delivered some relatively positive financial news Friday. Catholic Health Care Services, for example, which operates six nursing homes and a retirement home, had an operating profit of $3.9 million in the year ended June 30. Results at the facilities, which have been for sale since the summer, improved significantly from a loss of $497,454 the previous year, according to an audited financial statement released Friday....
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