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Retirement Village

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NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Florida company is planning to build a five-story, 300-unit retirement village near Brandywine Hospital. If it wins approval from West Brandywine Township officials, the Freedom Group Inc. of Bradenton, Fla., plans to build the village on 31 acres at Reeceville and Caln Meetinghouse Roads. Freedom Group has an option to buy the property from Bradley Conquest of Morgantown, Berks County. The retirement village would employ about 300 people. Plans for the community, to be known as Freedom Village, are being shepherded through the approval process by James Burnham of Glenmoore, who resigned as president of Brandywine Hospital last June.
NEWS
March 26, 1992 | By James Cordrey, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Delaware County Council Tuesday approved the issuance of bonds worth $80 million to build a retirement community on 40 acres behind Riddle Memorial Hospital in Middletown. The bonds are being issued by the Delaware County Authority, an agency that helps to fund health-care institutions, said Council Chairwoman Mary Ann Arty. The bonds will finance the building of the Riddle Village Continuing Care Retirement Community Project, said a spokesman for the authority. The retirement community will have 235 apartments, a gymnasium, a music hall and a banquet hall, the spokesman said.
NEWS
August 27, 1987 | By Marilou Regan, Special to The Inquirer
A vote on final plans for the proposed White Horse Village retirement community has been scheduled for Tuesday by the Edgmont Township Board of Supervisors. Although a special meeting had been called last Tuesday night to consider final plans for the development at Delchester and Gradyville Roads, the supervisors decided to put off a vote until their next regular meeting. "I'd feel more comfortable having time to digest this for a week," said Supervisor Sue Neuman. "I don't think a week will make a significant difference," said board Chairman Lynmar Brock Jr. Developer Frank Martin of Media first brought his plans for White Horse Village before the Edgmont Township Planning Commission in March 1986.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Developer Louis F. Hankin has taken his opposition to Warrington's new institutional zoning ordinance to court. Hankin filed an appeal last week in Bucks County Court because the retirement village he proposed at County Line and Kansas Roads would not comply with the new ordinance. Under the new ordinance, the size of a retirement village must be smaller than he has proposed. Hankin's 157-acre parcel off Kansas Road is the only institutionally zoned land in the township. Hankin's appeal said that township officials did not properly advertise the ordinance and therefore it is not valid.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Craig S. Palosky, Special to The Inquirer
The Springfield Planning Board on Thursday questioned the political impact of placing a retirement village near two landfills and the New Jersey Turnpike. Danmic Inc., an area development company operated by Michael Laino and Bud Quigley, had asked the board for a zoning change to build a 456-home age- restricted community on 169 acres next to a toxic Superfund site and the new Burlington County landfill. Denis Germano, solicitor for the zoning board, said that the landfills could become "a hazard to the body politic," if future residents demand that the township eliminate environmental threats, whether they are actual or imagined.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Andrew Liston placed his hand on the rounded front fender of a 1930 Ford Fodor, then knocked on the deeply burnished metal and nodded appreciatively. "This is so thick, so heavy - now it's very light," said Liston. "You touch anything now and you get a dent. " Although they had stopped to admire the Ford, Liston and his wife, Adele, were actually looking for a 1932 Chevrolet with a rumble seat - "the car we went on our honeymoon in 58 years ago. " It was a second-hand car when they owned it, Adele Liston remembered.
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On most days, it is remarkably quiet around the well-manicured lawns and spotless streets of Holiday City, a residential enclave built exclusively for senior citizens who want smaller homes, neighbors their own age, and, usually, a little silence. Come election time, though, they make themselves heard. They vote. Heavily. More than 80 percent of the neighborhood's 450 residents are registered, eclipsing the average in a township where one in two people sign up to cast ballots.
NEWS
October 20, 1986 | By S. E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Lower Moreland commissioners are expected to render a decision Nov. 11 that will affect a proposal to build single-family attached housing on Pine Road. The commissioners on Wednesday concluded their hearing on a curative amendment filed against the township by Holly Tree Associates, a Huntingdon Valley developer that wants to build 15 townhouses on 2.3 acres at 2760 Pine Rd. The hearing had been continued from Sept. 24. The amendment, or "cure," would allow single-family attached housing to be built on less than 10 acres, according to the developer.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Pennsylvania State University circles, there aren't many figures more prominent than alumnus and trustee William Schreyer, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch & Co. who has given millions to his alma mater. And if there is someone more appreciated, it's legendary head football coach Joe Paterno. So when Penn State President Graham Spanier proposed last year that the university lend its name and lease some college-owned land for a private real-estate venture - and when college officials selected a development partnership whose investors include Paterno and Schreyer - some members of the board of trustees were concerned.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | By Michele McCreary, Special to The Inquirer
Katherine Hettesheimer has a collection of admirers. On Valentine's Day, many of them got together to celebrate her 100th birthday and crown her queen of Twining Village, a retirement community in Holland. As she entered the community's meeting hall, wearing a black chiffon skirt and velvet jacket, more than 100 guests stood up and applauded. "Life is a gift worth celebrating," Hettesheimer said as she was escorted to her seat on stage. For a moment, she fussed with her white curls, gently adjusting the dainty sequin crown that had been placed upon her head.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Homer C. Curtis, 96, a retired psychoanalyst and leader in the analytic community, died of coronary artery disease on Tuesday, June 4, at Waverly Heights in Gladwyne. Before moving to the retirement village in 2011, he had lived in Haverford, Lower Merion Township, for almost 60 years. Dr. Curtis practiced in Haverford and Philadelphia, training therapists and psychoanalysts and treating patients until retiring several years ago. "His warmth, empathy, and insightfulness made him a much sought-after analyst, supervisor, and teacher," his family said in a prepared statement.
NEWS
August 12, 2003
Seniors need to plan for the advance of age Concerning the commentary "Seniors shouldn't go into hiding" (Metro Commentary Page, July 30), I agree that we would all like to be part of a vibrant community, a community of all ages, supporting one another, volunteering, helping other neighbors, etc. But when you get old (beyond 75 or so) there comes a time when you must really consider different lifestyles. What happens if your spouse gets Alzheimer's, or you do? What if you can no longer take care of your lawn and garden chores, or home maintenance such as snow shoveling or painting?
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Tales From the County" is a weekly feature highlighting unsung heroes, odd occurrences, hidden treasures, and everyday interesting people of Chester County. At this point, it is a bit difficult to tell just who has adopted whom. All that's certain is that both the retirees living at Freedom Village of Brandywine and the teenagers of the Chester County Youth Orchestra are so enthusiastic about each other that they've nearly worn out the words nice and wonderful. The Freedom Village residents, it turns out, believe they've been taken under the wing of the orchestra.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
To retirees such as Philip Heaver, the quiet grounds of Dunwoody Retirement Village are a sanctuary. Outside his door are thick woods and a brook draped with dogwoods; a young fox regularly comes by for breakfast. But Newtown Township officials have a different vision for this 83-acre landscape on West Chester Pike. They want to build a two-lane connector road to relieve traffic at the nearby busy crossroads of West Chester Pike and Route 252. In November, when Dunwoody filed plans to build a 41-bed assisted-living dementia unit that would serve Alzheimer's patients, the message from township officials came through clearly: Give us an easement through your property to build a connector road or your expansion plans will be turned down.
NEWS
January 29, 2000 | By Richard V. Sabatini, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An overnight fire that claimed the life of Anthony "Bobby" Arenz, 65, of New Britain Borough, has left members of a large Doylestown retirement village in shock and grieving the loss of their friend. Arenz, who worked at the Pine Run Community as a driver, touched the lives of dozens of Pine Run residents and coworkers every day. Ken Confalone, executive director, described Arenz, 65, as "a once-in-a-lifetime kind of person, who greeted everybody with a big smile and a caring remark.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | By Ken Dilanian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Pennsylvania State University circles, there aren't many figures more prominent than alumnus and trustee William Schreyer, the former CEO of Merrill Lynch & Co. who has given millions to his alma mater. And if there is someone more appreciated, it's legendary head football coach Joe Paterno. So when Penn State President Graham Spanier proposed last year that the university lend its name and lease some college-owned land for a private real-estate venture - and when college officials selected a development partnership whose investors include Paterno and Schreyer - some members of the board of trustees were concerned.
NEWS
July 3, 1995 | By David Kinney, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
On most days, it is remarkably quiet around the well-manicured lawns and spotless streets of Holiday City, a residential enclave built exclusively for senior citizens who want smaller homes, neighbors their own age, and, usually, a little silence. Come election time, though, they make themselves heard. They vote. Heavily. More than 80 percent of the neighborhood's 450 residents are registered, eclipsing the average in a township where one in two people sign up to cast ballots.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A Florida company is planning to build a five-story, 300-unit retirement village near Brandywine Hospital. If it wins approval from West Brandywine Township officials, the Freedom Group Inc. of Bradenton, Fla., plans to build the village on 31 acres at Reeceville and Caln Meetinghouse Roads. Freedom Group has an option to buy the property from Bradley Conquest of Morgantown, Berks County. The retirement village would employ about 300 people. Plans for the community, to be known as Freedom Village, are being shepherded through the approval process by James Burnham of Glenmoore, who resigned as president of Brandywine Hospital last June.
NEWS
July 11, 1993 | By Vyola P. Willson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This township, with a population of 2,257, is about to decide whether to grow by about 25 percent over the next few years. The increase of 550 residents would come from a retirement community proposed for next to the township's hospital. The community is expected to employ 150 people. Southern Chester County Medical Center has put together a complicated series of partnerships and corporations to create a $40 million complex on 88 acres next to the hospital, to be known as Jenner's Pond.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | By Christopher Durso, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Andrew Liston placed his hand on the rounded front fender of a 1930 Ford Fodor, then knocked on the deeply burnished metal and nodded appreciatively. "This is so thick, so heavy - now it's very light," said Liston. "You touch anything now and you get a dent. " Although they had stopped to admire the Ford, Liston and his wife, Adele, were actually looking for a 1932 Chevrolet with a rumble seat - "the car we went on our honeymoon in 58 years ago. " It was a second-hand car when they owned it, Adele Liston remembered.
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