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Retirement

NEWS
February 3, 2016 | Samantha Melamed, Staff Writer
In a conference room in Abington-Lansdale Hospital on Friday afternoon, there were all the trappings of a retirement party: helium balloons, a golf-theme sheet cake, stacks of gifts and cards that had been passed around the nursing units for signatures. Guests posed for one group photo after another. Then things took a turn. "She's licking my ear!" someone squealed. This particular send-off was for a duo of long-serving therapy dogs: Snowie, 12, an American yellow Lab, and Keenai, 11, a shaggy Great Pyrenees.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2016
Myth Retirement is a time to pursue your passions. Spouses want to spend time together in retirement. Turning 50 prompts many people to start thinking about their retirement. Most people don't retire until they feel they have enough money saved. Reality Most view retirement as a time of freedom. 60 percent of men want to spend more time with their wives, but only 43 percent of women want to spend more time with their husbands. Turning 50 had little to no impact.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2016
Is freedom in retirement more important, or is having enough money? The answer might surprise you. A new survey reveals that money and financial pressures don't influence when people choose to retire as much was first thought. For many, it isn't just about money, but about the freedom to enjoy life. That's just one finding in a 2015 survey of 9,372 pre-retirees and 2,293 retirees (plus 451 people who plan never to retire) by Fidelity Investments, with the Stanford Center on Longevity.
NEWS
January 22, 2016
DEAR ABBY: We recently lost our dog, a 13-year-old springer spaniel, to old age. His passing has left a huge hole in our hearts and lives. We miss his companionship, his personality and the structure that caring for him brought to our lives. We're 51 and 60, own our home and are financially secure. Some of our friends are discouraging us from adopting another dog. They say we travel too much. Last year, we spent 12 weeks away from home. When we travel, we hire a trusted pet sitter to move into the house and attend to all our dog's needs.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Robert E. Coughlin, 88, of Chestnut Hill, a retired city and regional planner, died Thursday, Jan. 7, of heart failure at home. Born in Boston, he was the son of William and Helen Coughlin. Dr. Coughlin graduated from Roxbury Latin School and received a bachelor's degree from Harvard University, a master's degree in city planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a doctorate in city and regional planning from the University of Pennsylvania. He served in the Navy before and after college, attaining the rank of lieutenant junior grade.
NEWS
January 19, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
Thomas J. Quinn, 67, of Phoenixville, a retired Philadelphia Police Department captain who served the force in numerous capacities, died Monday, Jan. 11, of cancer at home. Mr. Quinn lived in Philadelphia before moving to Phoenixville. He was a 1966 graduate of Cardinal Dougherty High School and a 2001 graduate of the FBI National Academy after four months of intensive training. Mr. Quinn began his career in 1969 as a patrolman in the 23d District of North Philadelphia. He went to the 24th District in Kensington and from there moved to the Highway Patrol for eight years.
NEWS
January 11, 2016 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Staff Writer
John J. Sweeney, 85, of Wynnewood, a retired rear admiral in the U.S. Navy and later an insurance company executive, died Monday, Jan. 4, of prostate cancer at Lankenau Hospital. In a career that combined military service with business, Adm. Sweeney made a point of serving as an advocate for young people. Born in Tamaqua, Schuylkill County, he moved to Philadelphia with his family at age 10. He graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1948 and from St. Joseph's College in 1952 with a bachelor's degree in economics.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: My parents and in-laws are all retired and reasonably well-off. They've filled their retirements with joining musical groups, coaching kids' sports, visiting family, gardening, etc. My husband and I, meanwhile, are working four jobs between us just to pay the bills. Often, one or both of us works seven days a week. Literally, almost every time we talk to the parents, they start going on about how "busy" they are, how they don't have time to read, etc. Any advice on how not to explode when they start in on this?
NEWS
January 4, 2016 | By Peter Cameron, SCRANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE
SCRANTON - After a career in surgery that spanned four decades, Gino Mori decided to head back to medical school in 2013 to fill some gaps in his education. After all, he completed his undergraduate education in science at Pennsylvania State University in 1953, the year scientists James Watson and Francis Crick are credited with discovering the structure of DNA. "You can imagine that basic science had changed quite a bit," he said with a smile. The 83-year-old physician completed about 40,000 surgeries in his 371/2 years in medicine, but after retiring Jan. 1, 2001, his lifelong thirst for knowledge pushed him back to school.
NEWS
January 3, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Staff Writer
A longtime Delaware County legislator announced Thursday that he will retire. State Rep. William Adolph, the 14-term Republican from the 165th District, said he would not run for reelection this year. Adolph, chairman of the House appropriations committee since January 2010, is a key budget negotiator for the House Republican Caucus. He lives in Springfield Township, where he is a former president of the board of commissioners. Before his appointment to the appropriations committee, Adolph was chairman of the professional licensure and the environmental resources and energy committees.
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