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Retirement

BUSINESS
May 3, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
An estimated 70 percent of U.S. households live paycheck-to-paycheck, but that doesn't mean they can't save for retirement. That's the argument of David Laibson, a Harvard University economics professor who was at a Pension Research Council conference Thursday at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. The trick is to enroll workers automatically in retirement-savings plans. "When you auto-enroll, they stick with it," Laibson, who studies behavioral economics, said during a break at the conference, which continues through noon Friday.
NEWS
April 30, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens looked back at his career and forward toward changes he would like to see made in the Constitution during an hour-long talk Monday at the National Constitution Center. Stevens, 94, who became a liberal pillar on the court, had high praise for Justice Sonia Sotomayor's dissent on the recent decision upholding a voter-enacted law in Michigan law barring the use of affirmative-action policies in state schools. He argued that such policies might gain more popular support if political leaders explained that they were needed to create a more cohesive society.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
The principal of a Chester County elementary school retired this week after district officials said he let students cheat on a standardized test. Mark Ransford, principal at Chadds Ford Elementary School, called 12 students who left questions blank on their Pennsylvania System of School Assessment tests to his office and gave extra time to finish, according to John Sanville, superintendent of the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District. While the test isn't timed, booklets cannot be returned once students turn them in. Sanville said the students were not helped while finishing the test.
SPORTS
April 24, 2014 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Penn football coach Al Bagnoli, who has won nine outright Ivy League titles in 22 seasons as head coach of the Quakers, will announce plans for his retirement at a Wednesday news conference, according to a source familiar with the decision. The same source said Bagnoli would coach the 2014 season and then be succeeded by longtime Penn defensive coordinator Ray Priore. "This has been in the works," the source said. It comes at a time of change in Penn's athletic department, with athletic director Steve Bilsky retiring, to be replaced July 1 by Loyola of Chicago AD M. Grace Calhoun.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
The leader of SEPTA's delayed $130 million smart-card fare system retired last week and went to work for the company that is assisting SEPTA in creating the new system. John McGee, SEPTA's chief officer of new payment technologies, is prohibited by SEPTA rules from working on the SEPTA project for one year for his new employer, LTK Engineering Services of Ambler. A SEPTA spokesman said McGee's departure would not further delay the installation of the smart-card system, which will replace tokens, passes, transfers, and tickets on SEPTA's buses, subways, trolleys and, eventually, Regional Rail trains.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rules need to be enforced at Bartram High School, Ozzie Wright said: no hoodies, no cellphones, no showing up late, no lingering in the hallways. Adults need to listen to students, but students need to listen to adults. "We need to get this school under control," said Wright, a veteran troubleshooter, retired district principal, and retired Army captain. Wright, 65, was dispatched last week to calm Bartram, the Southwest Philadelphia school where brawls and open drug use have been common all year, and where a "conflict resolution specialist" was recently knocked unconscious by a student.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Say bye to Walters May 16 More than half a century after entering the TV news biz, Barbara Walters will retire from the tube after a final appearance on ABC's The View on May 16, the network, a unit of Walt Disney Co., announced Monday. "In this business there are legends, there are icons, and then there is Barbara Walters," Bob Iger , chairman and chief executive of the Walt Disney Co., said in a statement. "She broke barriers, defied convention, made history, and set the standard for journalistic excellence for more than 50 years.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
THE LATE night TV war will soon have another new combatant. After helping Lady Gaga and Bill Murray close down Manhattan's legendary Roseland Ballroom on Wednesday night's "Late Show," yesterday David Letterman announced the closing of his own show. The longest-running late night host in TV history said he will retire in 2015, when his current contract expires. He announced no specific end date, telling his audience he expects his exit will be in "at least a year or so, but sometime in the not too distant future - 2015, for the love of God, [band leader]
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joan Sidders Valdez, 73, of Sicklerville, who retired in 1999 after 28 years as a social worker at Ancora Psychiatric Hospital, died of cardiac arrest Thursday, March 27, at Virtua Marlton. Mrs. Valdez's work in mental health did not end when her Ancora career did, a colleague, Carol Weiss, said in an interview. "She was extremely active" with the nonprofit organization NJ Partners: Aging, Mental Health and Substance Abuse Inc., Weiss said. Its website states that it was founded to focus "on the needs of older adults with a mental health or substance abuse problem.
NEWS
April 2, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
They stood at the lectern to talk about the rabbi who had strengthened their connection to Judaism despite what some may call obstacles. Todd Shotz is gay. Ashlee Check isn't particularly observant. Both say Rabbi Seymour Rosenbloom helped them carve out their own way of being Jewish. Now the rabbi who has led Congregation Adath Jeshurun in Elkins Park for 36 years is retiring, in part, he says, because he doesn't want to stand in the way of a synagogue and a faith tradition in transition.
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