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Retirement

NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddie Campbell's four tours of duty as a Marine in Korea and Vietnam helped prepare him for the battles that confronted him in Willingboro nearly 30 years later. But there were still a few ambushes. Campbell became a councilman in the predominantly black suburb in 1998 and had to tackle the fallout from white flight, shrinking tax revenue, and spiraling foreclosures. He was first appointed to the governing body after his wife, Doreatha, died of cancer while serving as mayor of their adopted hometown.
TRAVEL
January 26, 2015 | By Frank Hollick, For The Inquirer
"Let's head back to Montana next summer," said my fly-fishing buddy Tom. We had spent a week the previous summer on the beautiful Madison River, and in nearby Yellowstone Park in Wyoming, with our good friend Jim. While not catching a ton of fish, we had a fly fisherman's dream week. "I'm in. Let me talk to Jim," I responded, with visions of 20-inch trout rising to my dry fly filling my head. Jim said yes immediately, and to make the idea more palatable on the home front, we decided to ask our wives to go along.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
From a curved corner property on Passyunk Avenue, his windows packed with merchandise and signs promising to make men look better "if you let us," Abe Mandel has sized up a great many people over the years. Usually, it's to get them into the best-fitting slacks or most flattering shirts. Lately, his focus has been on three men in particular, to determine whether they are the right fit to succeed him at the helm of A Man's Image. He has decided they are. Mandel, 74, proprietor of menswear establishments in the same block of Passyunk (near 12th and Morris Streets)
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
A memorial service will be Saturday, Jan. 17, for Loretta Yvonne Mason, 66, a retired Philadelphia School District teacher, who died last month in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., from complications related to her lifelong battle with sickle-cell disease. A North Philadelphia native, Mrs. Mason had moved to Fort Lauderdale in 2004 after she retired. The daughter of Junius and Marie Hicks, Mrs. Mason helped establish a scholarship fund with her brothers to honor their mother for the role she played as plaintiff in a lawsuit that led to the integration of Girard College, following a 1968 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.
NEWS
January 13, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
JOE O'DOWD, a crack Daily News police reporter, was relaxing at his rental house in Brigantine, N.J., in the summer of 1987 when there came a heavy knock on the door. It was a Brigantine cop with a message from Joe's office telling him to get back to Philly to cover a development in the notorious Gary Heidnik murder case. Apparently, the office didn't have a number for Joe's summer place, so it had to track him through the local cops. Of course, Joe hightailed it back to Philly to check out the case of the man who kidnapped, tortured and raped six women he held prisoner in his North Philadelphia "House of Horrors," killing two. Joseph Donald O'Dowd, considered one of the best of a legendary contingent of reporters who covered the cops for the Daily News, the Inquirer and the Bulletin in the days before cellphones and the Internet, died Wednesday of cancer.
NEWS
January 5, 2015 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
By Michael Carroll I confess that I am a little envious of the peculiar and controversial public employee retirement program known as DROP, for Deferred Retirement Option Plan. I like the image, the sound of it, and the opening it provides for imagination. I would also like the money. Few inside Philadelphia government understand DROP completely, and even fewer outside have a clue. As I understand it, city employees declare their intention to retire in a few years, which is supposed to give the city time to plan for their departure.
NEWS
December 31, 2014 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joanne Williams has been riding Eugene "Smitty" Smith's Route 29 bus across South Philadelphia for many years. "He's an angel. He just don't want to marry me yet," she lamented the other morning. Since the SEPTA driver is retiring Tuesday, she knew this would be her last chance. At her stop, bracing herself on her cane, she whispered in his ear. "Nah," he replied, "my wife's a keeper. " They both smiled. Then she leaned in and gave Smitty a hug - he's been collecting many of those of late - and exited his bus at Broad Street for the last time.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ellen Greenlee, the longtime head of the Defender Association of Philadelphia, who began her professional life as a high school language teacher and went on to develop and expand one of the nation's most prominent public-interest law agencies, on Tuesday announced her retirement effective March 1, 2015. Greenlee has served for 40 years with the association, which provides legal representation to thousands of low-income people in Philadelphia each year. For about 25 years, she has been chief defender.
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nutter administration has invoked a provision of the controversial DROP retirement program to delay the departures of a dozen city managers and top officials who had planned on retiring next year. The administration cited the September 2015 World Meeting of Families, which includes a visit by Pope Francis, as a reason to extend the retirement dates for five managers, including the deputy commissioner for parks and recreation, Susan Slawson, and her chief of staff, Cynthia D. Douglas.
NEWS
November 30, 2014 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Stephen Holt came to Philadelphia to run the Visiting Nurse Association of Greater Philadelphia nearly a quarter-century ago, home health care was a "land of paper and pencil. " His staff had no GPS systems, laptops, or cellphones. Nurses did all their records and billing by hand, and had to call coworkers by landline. Now, as Holt prepares to retire Dec. 31, his nurses carry laptops, and can easily see what therapists and other practitioners have done with patients. "The nurse admits the patient at the bedside and pushes a button, and the billing starts," said Holt, 66. He is still so remarkably enthusiastic about his work that it's reasonable to wonder if he's ready to retire.
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