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Retirement

NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
James A. Woods, 74, of Mullica Hill, who retired in 1992 as a Philadelphia police sergeant, died Saturday, March 14, of pneumonia at home. Mr. Woods joined the department in September 1967 and was promoted to sergeant in April 1990, a police spokeswoman said. Born in Philadelphia, he grew up near 29th and Dickinson Streets in Grays Ferry and attended Edward E. Bok Technical High School. Mr. Woods helped prepare bread for a South Philadelphia bakery at the same time that he worked for one of the Philadelphia sites of the Horn & Hardart Automat chain.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Here's a quick financial-literacy quiz for you savers and investors out there, courtesy of Wharton professor Olivia S. Mitchell: 1. Suppose you had $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was 2 percent per year. After 5 years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow? a. More than $102 b. Exactly $102 c. Less than $102 2. Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was 1 percent per year and inflation was 2 percent per year.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
IN A MOVE sure to please animal-rights activists and the janitors who sweep up behind them, elephants are being phased out at the circus. This means when they travel, they'll no longer have to pack their trunks. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus , who have been parading pachyderms since P.T. Barnum introduced Jumbo in 1882, are putting their elephants out to pasture by 2018. Feld Entertainment, which owns the circus, still keeps 43 elephants, 13 of which are performing, but soon they all will be retired to the circus' 200-acre Center for Elephant Conservation in Florida.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Columnist
PEOPLE still yack about what a good pitchman Steve Jobs was for Apple. But when it comes to serving the sizzle as well as the steak in consumer-tech presentations, nobody's ever gonna match Joe Clayton, a 40-year industry exec finally cashing in his chips at age 65, "so I have time to take my new grandson hunting and fishing. " Damn, I'm gonna miss this guy. A few weeks ago, this outgoing president/CEO of Dish Network stole the spotlight at the giant CES electronics show in Las Vegas with a news conference entrance like we'd never seen before.
SPORTS
March 4, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first question from the audience was asked by Johnny Gaudreau's sister Kaitlin, a sophomore at Gloucester Catholic. "Who's your favorite sibling?" Kaitlin Gaudreau asked of the Gloucester Catholic product who has become known across the continent as "Johnny Hockey. " Back at his old high school for a pep rally and the retirement of his jersey on Monday afternoon, Johnny Gaudreau dealt with the loaded query from his kid sister as deftly as he handles the puck on a three-on-two rush for the Calgary Flames.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Let's see. Do I want an investment adviser or a financial adviser to help plan for retirement? A variable annuity, fixed annuity, or no annuity at all? How about stashing savings in an S&P 500 index fund - they're all the same, right? I don't have vertigo, but whenever I consider my options for retirement saving, my head spins. Then I heard about President Obama's AARP speech last week and wondered if the diagnosis - and a simple, straightforward treatment - had been sitting around untried all along.
NEWS
February 15, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William J. Coopersmith, 88, of Glen Mills and Jupiter, Fla., a retired executive, civic leader, and sportsman, died of cancer Saturday, Feb. 7, at Taylor Hospice Residence in Ridley Park. A Philadelphia native, he graduated from Villanova College in 1950 and spent a year studying at Georgetown Law School. The world of commerce beckoned, though, so he joined his father, becoming general manager of Great Leopard Super Markets. He operated one of the nation's first supermarkets in the refitted shell of a textile mill in Chester.
NEWS
February 13, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Lawrence Dixon, 86, of East Mount Airy, a retired Philadelphia police detective, died Thursday, Feb. 5, of complications from pulmonary disease at Fairview Care Center Bethlehem Pike in Chestnut Hill. Born and reared in West Philadelphia, he graduated from Overbrook High School in 1945. He enlisted in the Navy in 1945 and served in the Seventh Fleet aboard the Merrimack, a fleet oil tanker. Following his military service, Mr. Dixon was employed at the former Frankford Arsenal as an optical etcher, engraving glass used in Army telescopes and binoculars.
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charlie Vogel is a familiar face - a celebrity of sorts - in the Hershey's Mill retirement community in East Goshen, Chester County. In a dozen years or so, he has done more than 100 interviews for the community's Channel 20 TV station, which reaches 1,700 homes. Among his most memorable guests were former Phillies manager Charlie Manuel, Phillies second baseman Chase Utley, Phillies' Hall of Famer Richie Ashburn, and TV weather forecasters Herb Clarke and Cecily Tynan. Vogel also interviewed Bill Campbell, the famed Philadelphia sports broadcaster who called Wilt Chamberlain's 100-point game in 1962.
NEWS
January 27, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eddie Campbell's four tours of duty as a Marine in Korea and Vietnam helped prepare him for the battles that confronted him in Willingboro nearly 30 years later. But there were still a few ambushes. Campbell became a councilman in the predominantly black suburb in 1998 and had to tackle the fallout from white flight, shrinking tax revenue, and spiraling foreclosures. He was first appointed to the governing body after his wife, Doreatha, died of cancer while serving as mayor of their adopted hometown.
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