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Return Fire

NEWS
June 21, 2012 | By Stephanie Farr, Daily News Staff Writer
I SHOT A MAN in the head Tuesday. I didn't realize how easy it could be, or how little time I'd have to think about it. I never thought of what might happen to him or the consequences I would face. I couldn't. My adrenaline had taken hold, and all I could think of was suppressing the fear and surviving — surviving the two shots he'd fired at my bulletproof vest and the car stop that had gotten me into this mess, and then making sure he didn't shoot anyone else. It was unreal.
NEWS
May 17, 1992 | By Robert Jablon and Jeff Barnard, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Some lost their lives defending stores; others died while looting them. Some died in traffic accidents; at least one died of a heart attack. Most were black or Hispanic. They ranged in age from 15 to 89. All of them were in the wrong place at the wrong time: Los Angeles, between April 29 and May 3 - after the Rodney King verdict. For days, their deaths were merely riot-related statistics, tallied by the Los Angeles coroner. Some remain unknown - two men, one white and one Hispanic, found May 1 at two fire scenes.
NEWS
October 8, 2012
PHOENIX - The U.S. Border Patrol agent killed last week in a shooting in southern Arizona apparently had opened fire on two fellow agents, thinking that they were armed smugglers, and was killed when they returned fire, the head of the Border Patrol agents' union said Sunday. The two sets of agents approached an area where a sensor had been activated from different directions early Tuesday and encountered each other in an area of heavy brush, National Border Patrol Council president George McCubbin said.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early on a May morning two years ago, 90 U.S. Army and Afghan troops infiltrated a remote village east of Kabul in search of weapons caches. They expected, at worst, a firefight with 15 Taliban. But the patrol suddenly was scrambling, desperate for cover, when dawn brought a fusillade by upward of 100 insurgents. Whistling rounds fountained the dirt and shattered rocks. Machine-gun fire from 100-foot cliffs trapped the unit in withering cross fire. Within 45 minutes, two Afghan soldiers were dead and three critically wounded.
NEWS
September 19, 1992 | By Rick Lyman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The mourners had gathered early in Victoria Park Sporting Ground, the same outdoor arena from which the march on Bisho had begun last week, the march that ended with at least 28 people killed by security troops in the nearby black homeland of Ciskei. The drought that's hit southern Africa had burnt the grass a brittle yellow, and shards of it rose into the air like ashes as 40,000 African National Congress supporters clustered into a sun-baked stadium to honor the dead. After four hours of speeches - many of them harsh calls for revenge - the mourners walked out of the stadium, past the train station where blacks board trains to East London's factories, across the narrow bridge over a fetid ditch that separates their township from the white town, and into a hillside cemetery.
SPORTS
February 18, 1986 | Daily News Wire Services
Cincinnati's Dave Parker is beginning his training regimen for the baseball season with a personal storm cloud over his head. He is at work with the knowledge that his season could be curtailed or canceled. A decision is expected soon from commissioner Peter Ueberroth on Parker and 22 of the 23 other major leaguers mentioned in the Pittsburgh cocaine trafficking trials last summer. Ueberroth, who recently concluded his personal interviews with all 24 players, has exonerated Bill Madlock of the Dodgers.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Democratic U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who has been keeping a low profile as he prepares for his fall re-election campaign, yesterday blasted Republican challenger Pete Dawkins, saying he was irresponsible, unimaginative and out of touch with reality. Lautenberg, fielding questions at a New Jersey Associated Press Managing Editors meeting, called Dawkins' criticisms of his votes to raise certain taxes "irresponsible" and said Dawkins was in need of a "rendezvous with reality" on the issues of taxes and the federal budget deficit.
NEWS
October 9, 2002
IT APPEARS I've gotten under the skin of many people, primarily the vehemently anti-Street political bloc that includes state Sen. Vincent Fumo, Councilman Jim Kenney and Councilman Frank DiCicco. They have one overriding agenda: to say and do whatever it takes, regardless of the truth, to undermine the credibility of John Street and prevent him from winning a second term. Their latest ploy entails the enlisting of friends and subordinates to mount a transparent letter-writing campaign against me, denouncing my actions as a spokesman for the Street administration ("A not-so-even Keel" Oct. 3)
NEWS
July 20, 1986 | By Maureen Graham, Special to The Inquirer
In Washington Township, they're calling it Round 2. Thursday, only hours after a special investigative committee found that Democratic Mayor John Robertson had tried to use his political office for personal gain, Robertson returned the fire. At the urging of the mayor and a township resident, the township council directed its solicitor, Joseph Alacqua, to obtain the corporate records of Marsella Brothers Construction Co. of Glassboro. Robertson contends that Democratic Councilman Richard P. Marsella - a rival of the mayor's and a member of the special investigative committee - is an officer in the corporation, has failed to disclose his involvement and has voted to release performance bonds to companies that employ the firm.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1986 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
The family is not for sale. That was the loud and clear message Strawbridge & Clothier delivered yesterday in unveiling its strategy to repel New York investor Ronald Baron's takeover bid for the department store chain. The company's board of directors broke its 11-day silence, issuing a bold letter to shareholders that dubbed Baron's offer of $60 a share "highly speculative" and "inadequate" and said Baron lacked experience in the department store business. In a strongly worded letter to shareholders, the company also called the offer "coercive" and a "transparent scare technique.
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